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Jenkins Docker Container on Ubuntu Server 18.04

CloudMint | V 1.0.2

Linux/Unix, Ubuntu 18.04 - 64-bit Amazon Machine Image (AMI)

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External reviews

362 reviews
from G2

External reviews are not included in the AWS star rating for the product.


    Michelangelo v.

Jenkins, the easiest way to start with automation workflows and continuous integration

  • March 16, 2016
  • Review verified by G2

What do you like best?
Jenkins provides out of the box a complete Continuous Integration system that allows you to automate your development processes within a few minutes. Using it's plugin system, there's basically nothing you cannot automate.

When a single instance is not sufficient anymore, Jenkins is easily scalable and fast processing your workflows in parallel.

Jenkins offers a great dashboard to manage and display your running processes and even provides additional plugins to have key performance indicators (KPI) displayed on full screen in the offices so there's always transparency with the development teams.

Jenkins integrates with the majority of commincation tools, we have for example it integrated into our emails, Slack, IRC channels, SMS Service and Time Tracker so that developers don't have to worry they miss an important update or failure notification.
What do you dislike?
Sometimes you receive failed process stack traces that doesn't show clearly if the failure occured because something failed in Jenkins or in your application workflow.

Because Jenkins needs to be installed on-premise and is Java based there's a requirement to have a Java stack available just to run Jenkins. This can sometimes be an issue if you're not having a Java oriented operation as this adds additional support requirements.
What problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?
Jenkins is a Continuous Integration system that allows you to automate workflows beyond development so developers have more time to focus on what they do best: development.

By implementing Jenkins and a test driven development policy, we have reduced the development overhead by 400% and with the automated processes after development we have our changes pushed to production with less failures and higher quality.
Recommendations to others considering the product:
Jenkins offers a huge amount of functionality and it's easy to get lost in the overflow of options. My advise is to start small and automate pushing your local code onto production. Once you understand what it can do more, you can add more processes to this workflow and make them dependend of each other by building pipelines.

Once you feel comfortable using Jenkins, you can unleash it's real power and add all testing and QA processes in the mix, have conditional database provisionings and automate provisioning of cloud VM's.

Once you start automating your development workflows and move towards continuous deployment, you will see you're saving a lot of precious time that can be reinvested into your development.


    Gaël R.

A Good Old Continuous Integration Software

  • February 23, 2016
  • Review verified by G2

What do you like best?
Jenkins allows you to do absolutely everything. If a technology JUST came out, maybe no Jenkins plugin is available yet. You could write one, it's not hard, but you can also just use shell scripts, and do absolutely everything from there. It's easy to setup, supports everything you could need and just works. You can even customize it's appearance to match your company's branding, or to update it's oldish look, if you want.
What do you dislike?
Sometimes it feels old. Not so long ago the entire interface was built with HTML tables, like in the 90s. Even if you can customize it however you want, even if the interface has been worked on, it still looks like old. Nobody cares you might say, it's just a CI. It still made me switch multiple times to other CIs like Atlassian Bamboo. However, I always switched back to Jenkins after a few days.

I like things to look good, like Atlassian Bamboo, and in the end you are able to make it look good.
What problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?
When I was working a lot on OSS projects, I was commit-pushing without testing too much. Jenkins always reminded me when something didn't actually compile, some test broke or some other problem appeared. It also stores builds of every single versions, because I want to. It's a great way to give users access to builds directly.
Recommendations to others considering the product:
Jenkins looks older than all other solutions. It's because it is. It has much more plugins, supports much more technologies. You can be sure it can achieve what you want to achieve.


    Information Technology and Services

Amazing e complete service for continuous integration.

  • February 11, 2016
  • Review verified by G2

What do you like best?
- All variety of plugins and features available.
- Easy to install
- Huge and active community.
- Complete support for Java and Groovy, my main languages for development.
What do you dislike?
- The need of a dedicated server and some linux skills to install the service.
- Concerns about the server security and maintenance.
- Some build sequences of build, deploy and archive artifact could cause some confusion if you try to use different jobs for each step.
- Warning massages sometime are needed to avoid deploys by mistake in production environment instead of homolog by example.
What problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?
- All projects from my company are builded and deployed with one click (maybe two) with Jenkins, with this is possible to avoid human errors and gain a precious time with dedicated link direct with my target servers.
- All this is much faster and reliable with automated processes.
- No dependency to a specific person and machine when you must build and deploy, mainly in some kind of emergency in the last minute.
Recommendations to others considering the product:
If you have experience with cloud linux servers and some skill to install a service on then, you really should try Jenkins. After the first project is setup all the others will probably take 5 minutes to setup em run.


    Internet

Professional experience for development of a large number of projects

  • February 11, 2016
  • Review verified by G2

What do you like best?
A large number of features and ecosystem around jenkins.
Fast feedback about broken builds and consistent way of releasing software.
What do you dislike?
The desktop UI is a bit overwhelming and also there is no easy to use UI for mobile devices.
What problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?
Releasa software components & integration with Continuous Delivery Tools.


    Pavel S.

Day job CI

  • February 07, 2016
  • Review verified by G2

What do you like best?
1. The huge amount of plugins and frequent release rate.
2. Relatively easy set up and maintainance; the strong community helps by adding docs for common scenarios (e.g how to setup proper https rewrites with nginx).
What do you dislike?
The UI can be slow at times; when switching between sections, and in general the UI feels outdated (compared to other CI tools such as Travis).
Also, the documentationof of built-in features (especially security) could be improved.
What problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?
Automated testing and deployment to certain environments; rarely need to do that manually anymore.
Recommendations to others considering the product:
All you need is a machine with Java, and you have a CI platform in-house. I suggest googling for CI tutorials, but it's relatively easy to set up.


    Entertainment

I use Jenkins at work for Continuous Integration

  • January 31, 2016
  • Review verified by G2

What do you like best?
I love the fact that it automates the build process and works with many different programs through its API
What do you dislike?
The UI can be much more user friendly, I find it a bit hard to follow and use to its ful potential22
What problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?
We're using Jenkins for continuous integration and also as a means to deliver builds via email and other.
Recommendations to others considering the product:
I'm not sure what to recommend, it's a good product, but I don't have much experience with others.


    Computer Software

Continuous Integration a necessity for Software Dev Teams, and This open source solution delivers

  • January 27, 2016
  • Review provided by G2

What do you like best?
Can deploy on my own server. Run multiple predefined builds. Integrates with Github. Best for continuous integration, which is very important to any professional software development team.
What do you dislike?
Cluttered UI. Initially somewhat confusing. There are other more modern alternatives, but this does just fine as well.
What problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?
Continuous integration. Necessary to verify builds, automated functional unit tests, and user acceptance tests, which can run as much as per git push or pull request.
Recommendations to others considering the product:
There are other alternatives. Research them and come to your own conclusions on costs. Some solutions use external servers whereas in others you can deploy the CI software to your server.


    Computer Software

Best Open Source Build System

  • January 26, 2016
  • Review provided by G2

What do you like best?
The plugins make it easily the best open-source build system available. It's easy for us to spawn up new boxes to help share the load without worrying about on-prem licenses or anything like that. The wide selection of community plugins makes it very easy to integrate it with any software technology we use.
What do you dislike?
The administrative interface leaves a lot to be desired.
What problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?
Our team has grown a lot over the past year and Jenkins has never been a limiting factor in scaling up developers around the world. As we add new tools to our arsenal, we always find some plugins to help us leverage for better CI.


    Rahul C.

Great tool for continuous integration

  • January 15, 2016
  • Review provided by G2

What do you like best?
It is quite easy to setup the tool. And once it is setup, you just sit and watch .
What do you dislike?
The user interface is simple but it can be improved to something fancy.
What problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?
We are developing a iOS application. We wanted to automate the build process as it is done manually and is totally dependant on availability of the responsible person.
With continuous integration we are able to get the job done without depending on the human resources.


    Dmitry B.

Jenkins is not perfect, but it has best pipeline view plugins

  • January 08, 2016
  • Review verified by G2

What do you like best?
- Ease of use
- Variety of plugins
- Rich plugin API
- Pipeline support (build pipeline, delivery pipeline)
- Job parameterization
What do you dislike?
- No job templates
- Poor plugin compatibility (if you have a working configuration with 100+ plugins you probably won't be able to upgrade without breaking anything)
- Performance issues (1000+ jobs)
What problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?
- Build Java projects
- Build Kotlin projects
- Build Android projects
- Run automated tests
- Run performance tests
- Run static code analysis
- Produce various reports
Recommendations to others considering the product:
Jenkins has less support from core developers than commercial products.
However, it has large community and your problem will likely already have a solution if you use stable version of Jenkins and plugins.