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Cloud Native In-memory Database for Redis™ 3.2 (Amazon Linux)

Websoft9 | Redis 3.2.13.0 - AmazonLinux 2

Linux/Unix, Amazon Linux 2 - 64-bit Amazon Machine Image (AMI)

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External reviews

110 reviews
from G2

External reviews are not included in the AWS star rating for the product.


    Vincent C.

Perfect in-memory data structure storage with persistence

  • November 20, 2017
  • Review provided by G2

What do you like best?
The Redis database is really easy to install and also easy to use. Configuration also fits into a single file.
Performances are very good and this tool allows you to scale your applications with ease.

The interesting thing with Redis when you develop web applications for instance is that you can use it for many purposes such as caching files, storing temporarily data, queueing, pub/sub system, and so many things.

Redis also allows you to choose fine-grained memory types to optimize your data storage.

One last thing, but not least, you can also write some custom Redis modules using the C language. This way, you can go further with your data storage and trigger Redis functions programmatically.
What do you dislike?
Honestly, nothing. This is a very good product at all levels.
The thing I can criticize is the security part: I actually have a token stored in the configuration file (clearly); which is not the best way to protect data.
What problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?
I use Redis for managing tokens that automatically expire after a defined time (3 days for instance) and also in order to manage application cache with keys.

I know that a new feature is also available now: Redis Stream in order to manage consumers for reactive applications but I haven't tested it yet.
Recommendations to others considering the product:
I really recommend Redis for its simplicity and its robustness.


    Tong (Tony) J.

Practical tool for caching

  • November 14, 2017
  • Review provided by G2

What do you like best?
Fast performance, easy to use. Has support for basic data types, and more advanced ones such as HyperLogLog for solving count-distinct problems.
What do you dislike?
There is no native wildcard support for deletion operations in Redis command line client.
What problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?
Caching for web service. Active session tracking/counting.
Recommendations to others considering the product:
Setup multiple DBs for different general use with different default TTLs.


    Information Technology and Services

The essential tool for any distributed system

  • April 18, 2017
  • Review provided by G2

What do you like best?
The ability to easily handle things like sessions in a distributed environment without having to spend much time.
What do you dislike?
The limitations on some features that come when running a cluster.
What problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?
Moving from a centralized server to micro services and a distributed high availability setup.


    Computer Software

Simplicity is Beauty and Beauty is simplicity.

  • April 02, 2017
  • Review verified by G2

What do you like best?
The performance , robustness , easy to learn and ease to use in production environments .
What do you dislike?
scripting language , i prefer that use javascript for scripting in redis .
What problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?
we are using redis in data caching and socket.io related using .
Recommendations to others considering the product:
support javascript as scripting language and connecting and integrating to another databases as an optional module .


    Nico C.

Very quick server DataStore

  • February 11, 2017
  • Review provided by G2

What do you like best?
Redis comes in a very light and fast environment which allowed me to run my test on an old Raspberry Pi without lags due to computation times.
What do you dislike?
There is a big lack of documentation both on official website that on online tutorial.
Moreover the event management is quite poor (but under active development).
This, in addition to the weird syntax, caused a little of problems in getting started with it.
What problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?
I was working on a disaster-management mobile application and Redis was the datastore selected on server to manage the data because of it's impressive speed (which was a requirement in the development context).
Recommendations to others considering the product:
If you are looking for a very fast datastore, Redis may be what you are looking for. Please be aware that it is so fast because it saves all (of most) of the storage directly on RAM, therefore it requires a server with a lot of primary memory in order to exploit it's full potential. This may lead to an increment of costs which should be considered.
Redis has a log file on disk with the history of all action performed which is used in case of recovery. By default this log is updated asyncronously at certain time intervals, this means that if a problem occours between two interval, it may lead to a data loss. It is configurable to update on log on each action, but this has to be bechmarked as may reduce performances.


    Jonathan W.

Great in-memory storage

  • January 27, 2017
  • Review verified by G2

What do you like best?
What's best to appreciate about Redis is how quickly it's growing since it's first appearance and how useful and fast it is for many parts of a software implementation.

It always seemed to me like a storage option for caching or indexing, but it is way more than that. Some features are definitely to be highlighted like:

* Pub/Sub message system.
* Redis Cluster
* Expires
* Lua scripting
* Blazing fast

Are some of the things I noticed that make a difference when looking for this kind of memory storage.
What do you dislike?
I used to dislike the lack of features on Redis, but that was like 2 years ago, it has grown so quickly so fast that it's scary, the community is strongly focus on this product development.
What problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?
Pretty much anything that needs to be stored and retrieved fast, like caching is a great use case for Redis. For example to store session information in web applications. Also to store large amounts of incremental and volatile data, since it can be "expired".
Recommendations to others considering the product:
If considering using Redis for a project, just try it, it's easy to use and feature-rich. The community is really active and there's no lack on tutorial for a lot of use cases.


    Lee H.

Redis as a stream of intent

  • January 15, 2017
  • Review verified by G2

What do you like best?
Redis fits a sweet spot which is "out of band data store server". I work with a lot of CQRS/ES systems and in these systems it pays to have a persistent "out of process" view of typical data types such as hashes, lists, sets, etc.

It's fast, convenient, and the defaults make it a pleasure to use. Seeing how antirez maintains it makes it one of the go-to pieces of software that I instinctively trust based on years and years of astounding stability.
What do you dislike?
Redis has some sharp edges which only become apparent when you start to get off the beaten track. I recently suffered a few grey hairs because the algorithmic complexity of LRANGE is (S+N), where as the comment to insert into a LIST is O(1). The performance of LRANGE becomes problematic when taking the last few dozen items from the end of a very, very long list. Of course having huge lists is an anti-pattern, and it was easily solved by using the bindings Lua to implement a "fake" command which partitioned things into small lists, whilst taking care of pagination, etc.
What problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?
In our CQRS/ES system, the core concept is to pick the *ideal* store for reading, and writing. To embrace the asymmetry inherent in building systems to enjoy the freedom to pick the perfect data store for writing, reading, querying, etc depending on the exact use-case.

Redis' O(1) insert performance is idea. From there we have async processes that build idealised read-stores for certain types of data. Profiles are stored as JSON (on disk) ready to be delivered via our API with minimal involvement from the application servers. Things like contact lists, friendship groups and other "indexes" are also stored in redis as sets, hashes or lists. Redis solves all our data storage needs barring "static files" (for that we have a filesystem) and our "search" for which our clients usually expect something like ElasticSearch.
Recommendations to others considering the product:
Beware that Redis expects you to store data in the way you expect to *query* it. Take the time when designing your schema to imagine *how you want the data to look when you get it out*, and take care to store it that way.

In RDBMS you can query very flexibly to pull things out in any way you care to imagine, but you pay a penalty on inserts for this flexibility.


    Anson A.

redis

  • January 12, 2017
  • Review provided by G2

What do you like best?
ease of use, and ease of setup. Very fast for a KV store for reads and writes
What do you dislike?
only one master...not a masterless type cluster, which would be great
What problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?
needed a fast kv store for quick lookups. Using it mostly for cacheing of datasets for reports.


    Josh V.

Excellent utility

  • January 10, 2017
  • Review provided by G2

What do you like best?
I love how simple Redis is to spin up, and I love the protocol. Everything is so fast and simple.
What do you dislike?
I haven't actually setup any highly available Redis clusters. It seems complicated enough to be a bother, which is understandable given the actual technical complexities of any clustered application. That said, based on my research, setting up a highly available Redis cluster seems significantly more straightforward than a similar arrangement with something like PostgreSQL.
What problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?
Redis has made it simple to speed up several applications by not requiring certain things to be re-calculated over and over when the inputs for the calculation do not vary much. The built-in key expiration is a fabulous feature.

The PubSub features in Redis make simple work of passing messages between two or more applications. I've also used Redis as a way to synchronize resource locks across applications on the same system and across a network of servers. It's very versatile.
Recommendations to others considering the product:
Dive in head first. You'll love it. It provides immediate access to all sorts of wonderful features. It's simple to setup for development environments, for testing, and for production loads. As I mentioned previously, I've yet to setup a highly available Redis cluster personally, but the documentation suggests is straightforward enough relative to what it takes to cluster some other popular data stores.


    Fernando H.

Fast access to data

  • December 17, 2016
  • Review verified by G2

What do you like best?
Simple and fast access to key/value data, as well as score and rank system.
What do you dislike?
Not so easy to find/list existing keys. On the order hand, if you need list keys, probably you are doing something wrong.
What problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?
Cache, temporarily data, message queue, non persistent data, in memory database.