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Cloud Native In-memory Database for Redis™ 5.0 (Ubuntu)

Websoft9 | Redis 5.0.9.0 - Ubuntu 20.04

Linux/Unix, Ubuntu 20.04 - 64-bit Amazon Machine Image (AMI)

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External reviews

108 reviews
from G2

External reviews are not included in the AWS star rating for the product.


    b h.

Solid product with some limitations

  • July 16, 2015
  • Review provided by G2

What do you like best?
Small feature set, predictable performance, auto-expiry of data, very fast, very simple text based protocol, simple administration, easy to understand where your data is and what's happening to it.
What do you dislike?
I can't say I was enormously pleased when they introduced Lua scripting. The main selling point of the data store was it's simplicity and predictable performance. It would have been preferable that a couple more commands be implemented in C rather than bring stored procedures into the mix. That choice was probably based more on product development than customer need, and again the main attraction was the premise of simplicity. In fairness, it's been a couple of years since I last used it in production so perhaps it's worked out really well since then.
What problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?
I've used it for auto-expiring caches, it's great for that particular use-case. Can also be used as a convenient buffer for batch processes. I wouldn't put anything into Redis that I couldn't afford to lose, I guess it's more like memcached in that respect.
Recommendations to others considering the product:
Why not give it a try? It's simple enough that you can get it running in 10 minutes. The basic commands don't take a lot longer to master, and there's some advanced stuff you can do later. I would consider it ideal for transient data storage.


    Josh S.

Redis scratches a lot of itches

  • July 16, 2015
  • Review verified by G2

What do you like best?
The robust data structures that Redis offers are by far my favorite feature. It can be used as a simple key/value store like you would do with Memcached but also allows you to create hash tables to simulate more Mongo-like features as well as lists and sorted sets that can be used for queues, chat systems and leaderboards (basically anything you want sorted). Also, the option to flush to disk and have persistence is pretty awesome.
What do you dislike?
You can't really search through keys (there's a debug command for it, but not for production use) or through values. Sometimes you just want to be able to grab all the hashes that have value X and you simply can't without creating additional keys to track the mapping. This is a shortcoming compared to Mongo where you can still pull documents that contain a specific value. Also, the speed to shutdown and startup larger databases is a tad sluggish.
What problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?
I use Redis for a series of things, specifically a chat system and leaderboards for tracking site activity. I have also used Redis a ton in front of MySQL to serve as a more direct index in scenarios where queries are under performing and the tables are so larger (50m+ rows) that trying to reindex means a chunk of downtime. I also use Redis for user sessions. I am also starting to migrate away from Memcached for basic key/value stores in front of MySQL.
Recommendations to others considering the product:
I wouldn't recommend it as a drop in replacement for MySQL or anything due to the limitations for searching, but for caching as well as queues and scored data (like game leaderboards) it's the only choice.


    Juan S.

Redis is absolutely fantastic.

  • July 16, 2015
  • Review verified by G2

What do you like best?
What I like best about Redis is that it is fast. Absolutely, blazingly fast. I primarily use it as an edge cache on my applications for data that I would not want to do a round trip to either Mongo or MySQL for and I am constantly blown away by how quick it responds. It's like memcache on steroids.
What do you dislike?
The biggest thing I dislike about redis is that without proper management one can end up with memory fragmentation issues that cause performance degradation when writing large amounts of data. Granted, I haven't run into this issue as most of what I have used Redis for is profile and product data - records ranging in size from 1kb to 10kb at the largest.
What problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?
On the small end, I have used Redis to considerably increase the performance of client applications that were largely bloated and did many back and forths to the database as they were architected. When the client brought me on to fix their performance issues, the first thing I did was plug Redis in as a front data cache. Additionally, I have used Redis for a personal application with ephemeral data, using it as a simple KV store for the interim results of certain steps of a long running calculation.
Recommendations to others considering the product:
Try it, at least once - I'm sure you'll fall in love with it. If you're worried about persistency related performance degradation, a few tweaks to the kernel are all that need be done. Nothing painful!


    Geremy C.

Easy to use key / value store

  • July 16, 2015
  • Review provided by G2

What do you like best?
Very easy to install, setup, and get to hello world with.
What do you dislike?
Like many things, the basic setup and use case is easy, but to do HA, scaling, it takes a lot of knowledge of the system.
What problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?
I have used it as a high-speed cache for Ruby for web applications, caching ERBs, as well as full views.


    Levi D.

Redis simple review

  • July 15, 2015
  • Review provided by G2

What do you like best?
Speed of the database. I also really like the documentation on the redis website, it made it easy to learn.
What do you dislike?
The learning curve, it was very different than other traditional databases. You could also put this in the like column, as I liked the challenge.
What problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?
Leaderboards were the main use for redis in this instance, and it was amazingly fast compared to other traditional databases.
Recommendations to others considering the product:
Get to know the redis.io website, it's your best friend


    Internet

Using as a project database. Good enough

  • July 14, 2015
  • Review provided by G2

What do you like best?
open source, good integration, fast and convenient
What do you dislike?
not too much, maybe not enough tutorials when I try to look more deeper in it,
What problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?
really easy to start using, pretty straight forward and easy to use,
I used Redis to build a course project relate to auto-web-crowler


    Felipe L.

Excelente to use with cache database

  • July 02, 2015
  • Review verified by G2

What do you like best?
Simple to use, you can use together AWS Elastic Cache, pretty easy to use.
What do you dislike?
Doesn't has good tool to management data, but exists. I usually use implementation in nodejs called "Redis Commander".
What problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?
I use in my main app, in-memory cache (AWS elastic cache - Redis), it is so fast, I like so much.
Recommendations to others considering the product:
Sure, is better than memcached, so much fast and new.


    Higher Education

Redis, an underrated database that is really good

  • April 19, 2015
  • Review provided by G2

What do you like best?
It's an in-memory database and is very fast. Its operation is not very complex and it has APIs for multiple languages. Therefore people need not be language-bound for better performance. It also has counters and lists to which data can be added atomically.
What do you dislike?
The way Redis operates is by having all the data being handled, in-memory. It cannot persist partial data in memory and the rest on disk. While disk has been getting cheaper, memory is still quite expensive. So that makes using Redis quite expensive.
What problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?
We needed to store information such that it can read, modified and stored again. While the MySQL blob data type can be used for a similar purpose, Redis is a lot faster for such a use case.
Recommendations to others considering the product:
If you want a key-value store for data which is not huge, Redis can be very helpful, because it stores all the data it's operating on in memory. However, for Big Data, I would recommend HBase or Cassandra because they have been built to handle such a scale.