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Cloud Native In-memory Database for Redis™ 5.0 (Ubuntu)

Websoft9 | Redis 5.0.9.0 - Ubuntu 20.04

Linux/Unix, Ubuntu 20.04 - 64-bit Amazon Machine Image (AMI)

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External reviews

109 reviews
from G2

External reviews are not included in the AWS star rating for the product.


    Roman K.

Redis is the "must known" tool for backend developers.

  • January 15, 2016
  • Review provided by G2

What do you like best?
- Redis is open source
- Speed of work
- Publish/Subscribe messaging paradigm support
What do you dislike?
The Redis does not officially support Windows. I believe that redis should be easily installed on all popular OS.
What problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?
I'm use redis in my web-based projects as a session and cache system. The main benefits is speed and easy development.


    Riley T.

High performance, easy to work with

  • January 15, 2016
  • Review provided by G2

What do you like best?
Redis is very performant and easy to scale against. We ran this on a system powering thousands of light-load websites and it increased our web farm capabilities significantly. It is also very easy to wrap in a large number of software environments, ours being .NET.
What do you dislike?
Windows support is not very strong. While I think many developers would prefer to use Linux servers, often times the decision was made several years ago (and at a higher corporate management level) to use Windows; Microsoft has done a great job with lock-in once one starts using their products. Because of this I think the Redis community in general has lacked adequate focus in this area.
What problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?
We need a high-performance, distributed key-value cache. We immediately realized large benefits when Redis came to our database's rescue, off-loading unnecessary requests when data was unlikely to change.
Recommendations to others considering the product:
While the clustering support is not yet as strong as memcached, Redis has begun to focus there as is evident with Redis Cluster. Definitely look into Redis Cluster when considering Redis.


    Sean J.

Simplicity Included

  • January 15, 2016
  • Review verified by G2

What do you like best?
Embedded Lua scripting, speed, customization, and ease of configuration. The fact that it takes less than 10 minutes to configure and spin up a perfectly working Redis instance is amazing. Compound that with high-availability provided by Sentinel and some of the other tools available to spin up a Redis "pod" and the possibilities are endless.
What do you dislike?
Lack of security. Despite the fact that a user can limit access to Redis with a simple AUTH password and limiting database access to only local networks, I feel that there could be a little bit better of a security implementation, especially considering Redis' wide adoption.
What problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?
I found myself spending a lot of time searching for a decent SSO solution that was small, worked well with Nginx, and was quick. Eventually I gave up on the search and wrote my own and used Redis as a data store.

When I was spending time designing the session mechanism, some problems that always came up were expiration and session validation. In the sign-in process, a user is assigned a session token that maps to a hash of data in Redis. During sign-in, the SSO solution takes advantage of Redis' TTL and EXPIRE features to implement the session expiration. Because of this, the code got an extreme amount more simplistic. As far as validation goes, since it somewhat fits hand-in-hand with expiration, if the key expired or doesn't exist in Redis, the session is destroyed and the client is redirected.

With my SSO project, I really realized the true power of Redis. Its power and flexibility has drastically reduced the amount of code I had to write to achieve my goals.


    E-Learning

Developer

  • January 15, 2016
  • Review provided by G2

What do you like best?
Good to get data in real time, easy to use, easy to scale.
What do you dislike?
Sometimes the syntax is a bit limitating.
What problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?
Getting users data in real time. I was impressed by the low latency.
Recommendations to others considering the product:
Give it a go, it's very easy to get started.


    L. Preston S.

Redis is easy, and its potential knows no limit.

  • January 15, 2016
  • Review verified by G2

What do you like best?
I mostly like how there is such a big community around redis. I use redis with ruby on rails, and I just keep coming up with uses for it! All the apis they provide and then are available via the redis-rb gem make accessing redis dead simple.
What do you dislike?
Redis has never disappointed me, so I don't have anything I don't like about it.
What problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?
I'm using it for helping with background task running, for confirming emails, for inviting collaborators, and soon for aiding in deploying of my ember front-end.
Recommendations to others considering the product:
Redis is a dream when you use the redis-rb gem.


    Milad T.

Redis - Fast and efficient In-Memory data structure server

  • January 15, 2016
  • Review provided by G2

What do you like best?
Redis is a great piece of software. Stability and safety is among my top concerns when it comes to choosing suitable software ro fit my needs. It has a great community and its used in enterprise.
What do you dislike?
None. I had no problems so far with Redis.
What problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?
I use Redis to simulate message passing and mdispatching between many nodes among a cluster of machines. Because of its responsiveness and great networking capabilities ( it uses epoll on linux ), it can easily manage thousands of requests per second for exchanging data between nodes. It is highly optimized and efficient for this purpose.
Recommendations to others considering the product:
Add your own data structures into Redis.


    Internet

Awesome

  • January 15, 2016
  • Review verified by G2

What do you like best?
Free
Opensource
Simple to use
Very performant (it's written in C)
Supports lots of data structures and commands (for a simple KV store)
Great client support
What do you dislike?
Cluster support took to much time to be released
Better/more stable cluster support (better admin tools for creating/managing a cluster)
What problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?
Mostly data storage.


    Computer Software

Redis provides an easy to use, scalable key-value store.

  • January 13, 2016
  • Review provided by G2

What do you like best?
I like the ease of use that redis provides. Not only that, but it isn't limited by language so that it can be used in ruby, python, c, or any number of other languages.
What do you dislike?
It does take a lot of space to store the empty string, so there are some parts to be wary of.
What problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?
Scaling. Redis makes scaling easy


    Filipe O.

Lightweight and powerful key-value database.

  • January 13, 2016
  • Review provided by G2

What do you like best?
It's very easy to get started with Redis. It can store different types of values, making it fit in dfferent use cases. It's also useful to store cache and session stuff in memory.
What do you dislike?
I've heard it may turn out difficult to configure big setups for production, but I haven't been into that problem yet. So, I don't have anything to complain about it at the moment.
What problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?
I'm using it barely to cache session data, which is one of the simplest use cases of Redis. It's very easy to setup it in any application for caching and it's very fast when running in memory. Also, it helped me remove temporary data from my main database.
Recommendations to others considering the product:
There are many types of databases today, and none of them is suitable to store all kinds of data. Take care when evaluating Redis isn't a good choice, because it is - perhaps your scenario isn't well suited for it only.


    Semyon P.

Great solution for web dev

  • January 13, 2016
  • Review verified by G2

What do you like best?
Redis is not only very fast because of its in-memory store but also could persist data on disk via snapshotting. Installation is very simple, Redis is ready out-of-the-box. You could use this store absolutely with any programming language, amount of clients and drivers is really huge. It need just a little configuration and maintenance efforts. One of its big pluses: Redis is absolutely free and open source.
What do you dislike?
Configuring a cluster may be cumbersome. Amount of clients for each modern language makes you choose between similar solutions.
What problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?
We widely use Redis in web development. Our main use cases: key-value store for sessions data and fast queue for task workers.
Recommendations to others considering the product:
Redis is absolutely necessary solution in web development and I couldn't imagine modern application without it. It has "one command" installation and you will enjoy using it.