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Cloud Native Database for MariaDB 10.1 (Ubuntu)

Websoft9 | MariaDB 10.1.48 - Ubuntu 18.04

Linux/Unix, Ubuntu 18.04 - 64-bit Amazon Machine Image (AMI)

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External reviews

180 reviews
from G2

External reviews are not included in the AWS star rating for the product.


    Biotechnology

mariadb the future

  • May 01, 2015
  • Review provided by G2

What do you like best?
Scalability, multi master support
partitioning, high performance
What do you dislike?
Not top of my head

So far we are testing the servers
What problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?
performance


    Kumaran B.

DBA's has to use MariaDB...

  • May 01, 2015
  • Review verified by G2

What do you like best?
Free, stable, easy to install (Straight forward setup), can handle replication, reliability,most popular database in the world. I have used MariaDB for years and i would strongly recommend this product.
What do you dislike?
A GUI based setup for the replication & database management would be a needed feature.
What problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?
worked on several projects as a server / database administrator, i have implemented more than 30 MariaDB database (DEV/TEST/PRD environment). This saved our company huge amount of money (free license).


    Internet

MariaDB experience

  • April 29, 2015
  • Review verified by G2

What do you like best?
The best part about MariaDB is the support for multiple Database engines without requiring separate licenses. Impressed about the functionality provided by InnoDB and TokuDB
What do you dislike?
The lack of a GUI tool to perform basic admin tasks like scheduling jobs, backups, replication setup, etc
What problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?
We are using MariaDB for highly transactional data which changes frequently. We are also using MariaDB to aggressively archive and delete data from tables to keep them smaller which in turn makes the data manipulation and retrieval faster


    Andres B.

Deployed and Maintained www.miniclip.com's MariaDB servers. Thousands of Requests per second

  • April 27, 2015
  • Review provided by G2

What do you like best?
Its reliability and how powerful it is. I did not experience any problems other than normal replication issues but nothing that could not be resolved.
What do you dislike?
Cluster Capabilities. A better clustering technology.
What problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?
Highly scalable and easy to maintain.


    Andrei R.

Migration from MySQL to MariaDB for Digital Signature Web Application

  • April 24, 2015
  • Review verified by G2

What do you like best?
Simplicity, reliability. TokuDB engine support (data compression). Very fast. Replication is very reliable (and simple to setup).
What do you dislike?
Had to figure out some details. The one important feature is missing - multiple hard drives support. The data has to be on a single drive.
What problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?
Had to find the proper data storage for a fast growing data volume for a digital signature web application. The TokuDB Engine was chosen, because it allows a data compression, which is a very helpful feature, specifically for a fast data growth. Also, the replication setup was a breeze. Unfortunately TokuDB engine does not allow for a full cluster (master-to-master) setup, but replication is good enough. I was surprised of reliability of replication process. I did a crash test - just unplugged the servers and replication resumed after power was restored.
Recommendations to others considering the product:
It just works and a lot more advanced compare to MySQL.


    Derek R.

MariaDB has a great deal of flexibilty with a healthy future ahead of it.

  • April 21, 2015
  • Review verified by G2

What do you like best?
I have used MySQL for years and I really see MariaDB as the future of the MySQL code base. In my prior position its linkages to Cassandra and separation from Oracle were important to us.
What do you dislike?
The Cassandra connector at the time I used it was a bit limiting.
What problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?
At my prior company we used it as our core SQL install, replacing MSSQL as we moved to a LAMP stack. We also used Cassandra as our NoSQL solution, so the connector gave us some nice flexibility in how we interacted with that data store.
Recommendations to others considering the product:
I would have others look at what they get with MariaDB, there are some true upgrades with drop in compatibility with MySQL.


    Andrew P.

MariaDB is a good Upgrade from MySQL with few compatibility issues.

  • April 16, 2015
  • Review verified by G2

What do you like best?
Upgrading to MariaDB has made our custom built MRP system more robust and improved speed of access. There are also more options for reduncy like Galera cluster which i intend to explore in the near future.
What do you dislike?
i have yet to find any reasons to dislike MariaDB
What problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?
We upgraded from MySQL so to improve the speed and reliability of our MRP, We were having some problems with crashing and slow access which has now been sorted out.
Recommendations to others considering the product:
MariaDB is a better implementation of MySQL than the Oracle version, more stable, more redundantcy options.


    Stan P.

replaced informix and mysql with mariadb 4 years ago

  • April 15, 2015
  • Review provided by G2

What do you like best?
drop in replacement for mysql (storage engines renamed but there); new aria storage engine. back to being open source after mysql/oracle purchase- original engineers and new contributors should succeed to match/pass mysql installations. gradually replacing mysql in popular linux distributions
What do you dislike?
aria still seems to need more work. overall probably still playing catch-up to postgres but can get there
What problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?
worked on a project in past job as both developer and administrator, to migrate from informix to mysql, then to mariadb under linux. This saved thousands of dollars on licensing fees for informix and unix and eventually resulted in a more stable database for the business application
Recommendations to others considering the product:
If you are familiar with mysql, switching to mariadb should be quite easy. If it doesn't quite match your needs the source is available and you can modify things as needed. I was already familiar with the sources under mysql; mysys, sql, myisam, etc., and the work done there mapped across quite nicely to maria (none would have been needed if I had used the handler interface, but I had used the myisam storage engine directly)


    Simon P.

Replication and High Availability

  • April 15, 2015
  • Review provided by G2

What do you like best?
The set-up of replication is quick and straight forward.

If running Windows, then edit the hosts file located in:
/windows/system32/drivers/etc

On Linux:
/etc

Add entries for each database server to the hosts files with alias's:
192.168.1.100 server1.db.com
192.168.1.101 server2.db.com

Install mariadb on both systems.

Edit the 'cnf' file on each system, server1:
server-id=1
replicate-same-server-id=0
auto_increment_increment=2
auto_increment_offset=1
master-host=server2.db.com
master-user=repl
master-password=testpw
master-connect-retry=60
replicate-do-db=rat
log-bin="D:/MySQL/Data/"
binlog-do-db=rat
relay-log="D:/MySQL/Data/slave-relay.log"
relay-log-index="D:/MySQL/Data/slave-relay-log.index"
expire_logs_days=10
max_binlog_size=500M

Add to my.ini, mysqld section on server2:
server-id = 2
replicate-same-server-id=0
auto-increment-increment=2
auto-increment-offset=2
master-host=server1.db.com
master-user=repl
master-password=testpw
master-connect-retry=60
replicate-do-db=rat
log-bin=mysql-bin
binlog-do-db=rat
relay-log=slave-relay-log.index
expire_logs_days=10
max_binlog_size=500M

Of couse you have to edit the paths and passwords according to your own set-up.

Export the database from server1 with:
mysqldump -u root -p:##### dbname >db.sql

Import the dumped sql file into server2.

If error encountered when trying to change master to master_host, try:
reset slave;

Add firewall exceptions for port 3306 TCP/UDP or systems will not be able to connect to each other.

Use telnet to test if each system can see the other using:
telnet name 3306

Where name is the server alias.

Try to connect to the remote database using mysql:
mysql -u username -ppassword -h hostname -P 3306

Using a user name and password and the host name according to your set-up.
What do you dislike?
A wizard based set-up for the replication would be a nice feature.
What problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?
Replication, redundancy and single point of failure.


    Sameer V.

MariaDB is true open source database worth more than MySQL and for that matter Oracle too.

  • April 14, 2015
  • Review verified by G2

What do you like best?
We like pretty much everything about MariaDB. Easy replacement for MySQL. Text search features, dynamic column etc.
What do you dislike?
The Java Client support seems to be a bit rough
What problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?
A deployable database solution for our customer deployments with zero "0" amount of maintenance overhead
Recommendations to others considering the product:
Try MariaDB and you might not want to use any other DB