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Jenkins Server for CentOS 8

Kurian | 2.233

Linux/Unix, CentOS 8 - 64-bit Amazon Machine Image (AMI)

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External reviews

305 reviews
from G2

External reviews are not included in the AWS star rating for the product.


    Retail

User friendly and easy to implement

  • December 18, 2015
  • Review provided by G2

What do you like best?
User Experience is very good and the user
What do you dislike?
Documentation is not provided for a lot of queries
What problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?
Trying to automate the building process for the application


    Joshua C.

use jenkins for all of my projects

  • December 18, 2015
  • Review verified by G2

What do you like best?
Web console is very easy to use, and is great for non-technical people
What do you dislike?
the deployment automation can be a bit tricky with ssh key management.
What problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?
Automated clean builds of projects and deployments to our production environments. Repeatable builds with history of build logs.
Recommendations to others considering the product:
Use the Jenkins plugins. Also have a test jenkins server that you can play around with various jenkins configurations/ new plugins.


    Frédéric B.

May be the best tool for continuous integration

  • December 18, 2015
  • Review verified by G2

What do you like best?
- Ease of use
- Extensibility
- Everybody knows Jenkins nowday
What do you dislike?
- Too much things in it to understand and deeply master the tool
- New releases come too often
What problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?
Automate development and release processes
Recommendations to others considering the product:
Don't think too long, use Jenkins


    Internet

Works great

  • December 18, 2015
  • Review provided by G2

What do you like best?
On demand task execution is done very well. Even scheduled tasks for fine but in some configurations the git integration is lacking.

Most of the plugins work very well and can make our job easier.
What do you dislike?
The Interface is pretty old and has some things that are just strange. Some realtime indicators are broken for years.
What problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?
Automated testing and deployment is our main thing we solved with this. Having a tested deployment is key when deploying multiple times a day.


    Administrator in Internet

DevOps Engineer at Refinery29

  • December 18, 2015
  • Review verified by G2

What do you like best?
Jenkins is tested, well-known system with a decent ecosystem of plugins and support.
What do you dislike?
Markup. All the configuration is stored in XML, which imho is overkill for what Jenkins does. It also makes version control awkward. I really wish I could use git to keep track of versions of jobs and also as deployment method. Linux sys admins tend to live on the command line, but you can't do that with Jenkins because it forces you to use the other thing that Jenkins has with bad Markup—its gui—bad css, and bad AJAX. I feel like I'm using a system built with '90s web tech by people who don't know much about web design. That opinion is certainly an artifact of my history as a full stack engineer.
What problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?
I've always used Jenkins whenever we need an interface to keep track of, and run, jobs.
Recommendations to others considering the product:
It's good at what it does, but once you scale up and have dozens, if not hundreds, of jobs, maintaining Jenkins can be a bitch. Travis is a good alternative for build jobs, I've heard good things about CircleCI, and GoCD was alright, though CircleCI is a sass offering, and GoCD suffers the same ills that Jenkins does when it comes to version control. For now, Jenkins is likely best in class, but I would love to see an alternative.


    Leisure, Travel & Tourism

Jenkins brings comfort and sanity to our tests

  • December 18, 2015
  • Review provided by G2

What do you like best?
Despite being Java, Jenkins is trivial to setup. A simple .war file deployment that anyone with shell experience can get going.

Once setup, adding a job to build and test your application is easy. Then, extending it with the huge assortment of plugins makes Jenkins very powerful.
What do you dislike?
The interface feels quite dated, and some of the configuration is not clear. There is a learning curve to navigating your way around Jenkins.
What problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?
Knowing full well that all your tests are passing, in a variety of manners (unit, integration) is highly beneficial to being comfortable about deploying code. Being able to continuously run tests with direct engagement by a developer makes it a task that is never forgotten.


    Information Technology and Services

Deploying jobs easily

  • December 17, 2015
  • Review verified by G2

What do you like best?
Ability to deploy various jobs from servers that run specified batch jobs
What do you dislike?
Can become cluttered. without a path to navigate to specific job to kickoff it isn't as straight forward how to get back to a job run previously
What problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?
testing applications. specifically kicking off jobs that call batch jobs from our servers
Recommendations to others considering the product:
Be sure to write down path to jobs, note it in a notepad .txt file for your records (makes it easier to navigate back to a job you ran previously)


    Jonathan Y.

Fantastic ecosystem, cross-platform support

  • December 17, 2015
  • Review verified by G2

What do you like best?
Jenkins is a very popular CI/CD solution. There are plugins for basically everything, and plugins aren't that difficult to create. It supports Windows, Mac and Linux, which can be important for cross-platform projects as it ensures that all build configurations are consistent and reports are available from a single dashboard. Many projects use it and there is commercial support available from CloudBees and other companies.

It's a simplistic architecture, where a Jenkins master controls builds on a number of agents (slaves). No database is needed and upgrades are straightforward (simply requires replacing a WAR file and restarting, and Jenkins has capabilities to allow automated upgrades as well).

There are plugins available for managing slave machines (e.g. dynamically provisioning new virtual machines on VMware vCenter or OpenStack). The tooling capability can be used to manage system-level tools (ensuring that NodeJS or Java are available to the build) and to keep them up-to-date. This dramatically improves manageability for build agents, as they are effectively disposable machines (it's quite easy to provision new ones whenever needed from the Jenkins console, as long as your builds don't rely on state that isn't controlled by Jenkins).
What do you dislike?
Jenkins is a bit ugly, though that has improved over time. Service-based solutions like Travis CI and AppVeyor are much better looking, and have better direct integration with GitHub. Additionally, build configurations are kept separate from version control, though there are basic audit logging capabilities.
What problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?
Building software projects and running periodic tasks using Java, NodeJS, batch scripts, and other tools.
Recommendations to others considering the product:
Give Jenkins a try! It's exceedingly simple to configure, builds can be set up with just a few clicks, it has a rich plugin ecosystem, and works across platforms.


    Rodolfo S.

Jenkins the Jedi of Integration

  • December 17, 2015
  • Review provided by G2

What do you like best?
I love the idea I can host my own testing engine in my servers.
What do you dislike?
That is written in Java. I prefer another languages but this is only a preference of my coding style nothing to do with the software itself
What problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?
Deployments made really simple now that I have a engine to test across all my microservices.
Recommendations to others considering the product:
just do it.


    Eric M.

Your new, hardest-working teammate.

  • December 17, 2015
  • Review verified by G2

What do you like best?
Jenkins is easy to automate and presents a fully self-hosted continuous integration service that is a fantastic alternative to 3rd party (hosted) solutions. It can run just about any task and sit comfortably on a local machine or behind a corporate firewall.
What do you dislike?
As a free (libre) product, the UI in Jenkins leaves a bit to be desired when compared to industry alternatives like Travis. Much of the configuration is bulky, hard to understand, or requires manual intervention via the command line.
What problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?
Both continuous integration (automated code testing and deployment) and environment setup. We've been able to shave not just hours but _weeks_ off our development time by automating common tasks with Jenkins!
Recommendations to others considering the product:
Make sure a sysadmin keeps an eye on the server. Plugin and framework updates are frequent, and once you're hosting your own application, you need to stay ahead of the game with security patches.