Sign in
Categories
Your Saved List Partners Sell in AWS Marketplace Amazon Web Services Home Help

Jenkins Server for CentOS 8

Kurian | 2.233

Linux/Unix, CentOS 8 - 64-bit Amazon Machine Image (AMI)

Reviews from AWS Marketplace

0 AWS reviews
  • 5 star
    0
  • 4 star
    0
  • 3 star
    0
  • 2 star
    0
  • 1 star
    0

External reviews

305 reviews
from G2

External reviews are not included in the AWS star rating for the product.


    Mykel A.

The way we do CI (at the moment)

  • December 15, 2015
  • Review verified by G2

What do you like best?
We're primarily a maven build shop, so our builds tend to "just work" inside Jenkins.
The plugin architecture is weird but there are a huge pile of them. I've only rarely had to implement my own.

We frequently use Jenkins to provide validation of builds that are too complex to do locally,
What do you dislike?
The interface is very 2005. Better than Bugzilla, at least. The credential management is pretty oddball, but can be figured out.

The quality of 3rd party plugins varies widely from crap to awesome.
What problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?
We're looking for continuous integration testing with multiple slave machines of different capabilities. Jenkins gives this to us essentially for free. We tried Cloudbees but it was difficult to migrate our mechanisms to their hosted environment.
Recommendations to others considering the product:
Make sure your build tools are supported.
User management can be very challenging.


    Siôn l.

Jenkins is highly customisable and good for testing and CI for private repositories.

  • December 15, 2015
  • Review verified by G2

What do you like best?
Jenkins can run on your own infrastructure which makes it ideal for testing and deploying private code for work. It has plugins for all my needs it's highly configurable and was easy to integrate with our gitolite hooks. Complex setups can also be re-used by basing new tasks off existing ones.
What do you dislike?
Configuring tasks can require a lot of clicking in the web GUI which creates a slight administrative overhead when making tasks for many small projects, especially when compared to some simpler tools which read their instructions from a configuration file.
What problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?
Jenkins runs our tests and checks our code quality when our remote repositories receive new commits. It also checks the code is buildable for production releases. This conveniently alerts us if something is wrong, without us having to actively check anything, so we can focus on work.
Recommendations to others considering the product:
Although it is easy to install Jenkins from your distribution, Jenkins is able update itself and thereby get a version likely much fresher than what is initially distributed. Plugins can also be installed and maintained easily in a similar fashion. There are hosted Jenkins services but it's easy enough to set up on-site that I would recommend it.


    Roberto O.

Build all the things1

  • December 14, 2015
  • Review provided by G2

What do you like best?
Jenkins is free, open and has a very huge community behind its back: if you have an issue, you can bet on the fact that there is someone ready to help you . There is no way you have to give up on your plan of building everything with Jenkins as this would not happen. Rock solid, open and spread, One of the best CI ever.
What do you dislike?
Building for the Android platform is easy, once you get up and running. And this is the pain point for most of the user: setting everything up (included the Android SDK) can be hard and time consuming but, if you do not desist, you will surely manage and be able to use Jenkins at the full potential for your builds.
What problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?
In both my previous employments, we were using Jenkins as both CI and Build Automation: I used it with Ant and with Gradle and the tool was really doing its job. Nightly builds, test runs and APK archiving, all automatically whenever you needed, with a release build always ready to be served.
Recommendations to others considering the product:
If you need an open source build system and are not scared from the (maybe) time consuming activity of configuring your builds for each and every platform you develop for, Jenkins is your tool. No one can match its versatility, its reliability and the community behind this software. You will most certainly face issues, but I'm positive about the fact that someone will be ready to help you finding the right path to your solution!


    Yasmany C.

CI made easy

  • December 14, 2015
  • Review provided by G2

What do you like best?
From jenkins i like the plugin platform its really open and from that you can find a lot of great plugins for almost any task integration you will need for build or deploy your solution
What do you dislike?
The user interface is not as friendly as could be
What problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?
From CI to CD our company use jenkins to integrate all the teams, developers can test the bleeding edge of the code and release to the next stage so QA can perform additional testing and certification so they can also deploy to the next stage and so on


    David H.

Jenkins: IndieDev or Team - a tool for making pro software

  • December 14, 2015
  • Review provided by G2

What do you like best?
Extensibility; there a tool for practically every development and build automation you can think of.
What do you dislike?
Can bit initially hard to set up if you're not familiar with all of the supporting tools it needs for your given task; if you're doing iOS develop there is a lot more effort required to get everything integrated with Xcode, build profiles etc.
What problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?
Build automation for iOS applications.
Recommendations to others considering the product:
Make sure you really understand your development & deployment process before you attempt to bring Jenkins into the mix. if your current system it heavily tied to a single user or group of users you will really want to break those cycles before trying to use a CI system like Jenkins. Alternatively if you want to find all the places your build process will break and all the holes in your deployment system trying to dive into Jenkins will do that for you. Be prepared to spend a couple of weeks working out the kinks and adjusting your development regime so that your devs don't break the build process over & over not even talking about failing tests here... just the building process part).


    Steve F.

Flexible, well-supported, enterprise-class CI available for free.

  • December 14, 2015
  • Review verified by G2

What do you like best?
Highly flexible, customizable, and free/open source build automation that actually works well for any automated process. Comes with a wide selection of plugins and a great community.
What do you dislike?
Jenkins is still in need of some visual modernization (full responsive design, updated/customizable icons, minimalistic but effective visual cues, etc.). It would be nice to see an official mobile app as well.
What problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?
In addition to using Jenkins for all of our building and deploying of code (ASP.NET, C#, VB.NET, Classic ASP, static HTML, etc.), we have switched to it for every job that we have. Since it is able to run terminal commands directly (Windows batch commands, PowerShell, Linux bash commands, etc.), we have configured it to run jobs that run SQL commands, sync files, create feeds, load balance our web servers, and more.
Recommendations to others considering the product:
Try it out. Don't be scared off by a slightly outdated-looking UI - this is a very advanced and modern application.


    Ananyo S.

Integrated build system for your projects

  • December 12, 2015
  • Review verified by G2

What do you like best?
Their motto is continuous integration and it really rings true when you see your projects getting built and instantly deployed when you make a simple push. Jenkins is quite easy to set up. It can be configured to pull directly from your repo like github and push to your server at openshift or digitalocean. It shows build status, what process is running and the console output of the process, every build status can be recorded and you can review builds that failed. You can even manually start a build from recent copy. All this can be done from the web interface
What do you dislike?
The web interface in itself is clunky and not so straightforward. I had to jump through some hoops to enable github hooks to build at git push.
What problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?
I have a website in openshift that I use to manage the login system of our club. It was hosted on openshift and openshift mandated ssh git access to push but in our network ssh is blocked. Github worked because of https. Used jenkins to sync the repo. Now I could directly push to github and get the job doen, as simple as a push.
Recommendations to others considering the product:
Jenkins is not as easy as github or openshift, both of these have beautiful interface, easy to spot options etc.. It takes some time to configure jenkins if you have never done this before but once it is set up, you can pretty much forget it. Try it once.


    Information Technology and Services

Most customizable CI

  • December 11, 2015
  • Review verified by G2

What do you like best?
In Jenkins we can do almost everything we want, you don't have restrictions like others CIs, for example, here we build and deploy mobile projects without restrictions.
What do you dislike?
Sometimes when we want to do simple stuffs we can't just click and it's done.
For example in others CIs, like Travis CI or Cicle CI we can add a yaml file and just wait for the configuration, in Jenkins we need to setup the project, but at least we don't have restriction about what we can do
What problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?
We are using jenkins to build mobile applications, using master and slaves for Android, iOS and Windows Phone. We also use for web applications and integration with AWS and deployment to mobile stores. The principal case that we need Jenkins to solve is to build iOS projects at Mac slave.
Recommendations to others considering the product:
Jenkins can solve all of your problems to automate, integrate and deploy/delivery, but you'll need to study the documentation.


    Hélio C.

Community Software. Also known as Hudson

  • December 11, 2015
  • Review provided by G2

What do you like best?
Very customizable tool to keep your coding working. Fits well for teams of any size. By running your source code automated tests, you and your team can easily check if that modification will work into production environment as expected/designed.

Jenkins works with a vast range of languages such Java, PHP, Ruby, Python, Clojure, etc. There are tons of templates for each languages ready to be deployed into your own Jenkins' copy, avoid you to redo/search lots of its configurations.

Jenkins can runs Unit Testing, Functional/Acceptance/End-to-end tests; Frontend tests (Casper.js, Mocha, even Selenium is well supported).

There are tons of analytics plugins to keep your code quality based on language's metrics and best practices.

It's a free and open source software, so, you do not fear to get your code check by Jenkins.

Another import thing to mention is: Jenkins has at least 5 years of constant development by open source community. You can easily found Q&A on how to setup, configure, customize it on the Internet.

I do recommend if you have some deploy experience.
What do you dislike?
There is no SaaS version. You need to download and push to your own server to use it.
Also, it's a little bit ugly in a UI wise but it does not compromise in any way your daily basis use.
What problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?
Continuous Integration; Continuous Deployment; Code Static Analysis.
Recommendations to others considering the product:
Price; Community support; Features


    Shayne V.

Jenkins Review From A QA Engineer Perspective

  • December 11, 2015
  • Review verified by G2

What do you like best?
Jenkins has worked out very well for continuous integration for our team. It helps keep code cleaner by providing fast feedback if new code pushed into the repository breaks the build. The nightly builds are utilized by QA quite often to perform in sprint testing and write test cases.
What do you dislike?
As a QA Engineer who writes automated tests, I don't personally write code for our application, however, I hear from our developers that updating Jenkins can be quite tedious which is a drawback. For me personally, the UI looks outdated and can be improved upon.
What problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?
Continuous integration helps keep our product cleaner and the nightly builds are great for QA to grab the latest and greatest to perform in sprint testing. QA uses the nightly builds quite often to write up to date test cases before they start official QA.
Recommendations to others considering the product:
Giving QA access to your nightly builds greatly improves the QA process and to keep test suites up to date. These builds help QA get an early start with in sprint testing before the official QA process begins.