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Jenkins Server for CentOS 8

Kurian | 2.233

Linux/Unix, CentOS 8 - 64-bit Amazon Machine Image (AMI)

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External reviews

311 reviews
from G2

External reviews are not included in the AWS star rating for the product.


    Administrator in Internet

DevOps Engineer at Refinery29

  • December 18, 2015
  • Review verified by G2

What do you like best?
Jenkins is tested, well-known system with a decent ecosystem of plugins and support.
What do you dislike?
Markup. All the configuration is stored in XML, which imho is overkill for what Jenkins does. It also makes version control awkward. I really wish I could use git to keep track of versions of jobs and also as deployment method. Linux sys admins tend to live on the command line, but you can't do that with Jenkins because it forces you to use the other thing that Jenkins has with bad Markup—its gui—bad css, and bad AJAX. I feel like I'm using a system built with '90s web tech by people who don't know much about web design. That opinion is certainly an artifact of my history as a full stack engineer.
What problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?
I've always used Jenkins whenever we need an interface to keep track of, and run, jobs.
Recommendations to others considering the product:
It's good at what it does, but once you scale up and have dozens, if not hundreds, of jobs, maintaining Jenkins can be a bitch. Travis is a good alternative for build jobs, I've heard good things about CircleCI, and GoCD was alright, though CircleCI is a sass offering, and GoCD suffers the same ills that Jenkins does when it comes to version control. For now, Jenkins is likely best in class, but I would love to see an alternative.


    Leisure, Travel & Tourism

Jenkins brings comfort and sanity to our tests

  • December 18, 2015
  • Review provided by G2

What do you like best?
Despite being Java, Jenkins is trivial to setup. A simple .war file deployment that anyone with shell experience can get going.

Once setup, adding a job to build and test your application is easy. Then, extending it with the huge assortment of plugins makes Jenkins very powerful.
What do you dislike?
The interface feels quite dated, and some of the configuration is not clear. There is a learning curve to navigating your way around Jenkins.
What problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?
Knowing full well that all your tests are passing, in a variety of manners (unit, integration) is highly beneficial to being comfortable about deploying code. Being able to continuously run tests with direct engagement by a developer makes it a task that is never forgotten.


    Information Technology and Services

Deploying jobs easily

  • December 17, 2015
  • Review verified by G2

What do you like best?
Ability to deploy various jobs from servers that run specified batch jobs
What do you dislike?
Can become cluttered. without a path to navigate to specific job to kickoff it isn't as straight forward how to get back to a job run previously
What problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?
testing applications. specifically kicking off jobs that call batch jobs from our servers
Recommendations to others considering the product:
Be sure to write down path to jobs, note it in a notepad .txt file for your records (makes it easier to navigate back to a job you ran previously)


    Jonathan Y.

Fantastic ecosystem, cross-platform support

  • December 17, 2015
  • Review verified by G2

What do you like best?
Jenkins is a very popular CI/CD solution. There are plugins for basically everything, and plugins aren't that difficult to create. It supports Windows, Mac and Linux, which can be important for cross-platform projects as it ensures that all build configurations are consistent and reports are available from a single dashboard. Many projects use it and there is commercial support available from CloudBees and other companies.

It's a simplistic architecture, where a Jenkins master controls builds on a number of agents (slaves). No database is needed and upgrades are straightforward (simply requires replacing a WAR file and restarting, and Jenkins has capabilities to allow automated upgrades as well).

There are plugins available for managing slave machines (e.g. dynamically provisioning new virtual machines on VMware vCenter or OpenStack). The tooling capability can be used to manage system-level tools (ensuring that NodeJS or Java are available to the build) and to keep them up-to-date. This dramatically improves manageability for build agents, as they are effectively disposable machines (it's quite easy to provision new ones whenever needed from the Jenkins console, as long as your builds don't rely on state that isn't controlled by Jenkins).
What do you dislike?
Jenkins is a bit ugly, though that has improved over time. Service-based solutions like Travis CI and AppVeyor are much better looking, and have better direct integration with GitHub. Additionally, build configurations are kept separate from version control, though there are basic audit logging capabilities.
What problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?
Building software projects and running periodic tasks using Java, NodeJS, batch scripts, and other tools.
Recommendations to others considering the product:
Give Jenkins a try! It's exceedingly simple to configure, builds can be set up with just a few clicks, it has a rich plugin ecosystem, and works across platforms.


    Rodolfo S.

Jenkins the Jedi of Integration

  • December 17, 2015
  • Review provided by G2

What do you like best?
I love the idea I can host my own testing engine in my servers.
What do you dislike?
That is written in Java. I prefer another languages but this is only a preference of my coding style nothing to do with the software itself
What problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?
Deployments made really simple now that I have a engine to test across all my microservices.
Recommendations to others considering the product:
just do it.


    Eric M.

Your new, hardest-working teammate.

  • December 17, 2015
  • Review verified by G2

What do you like best?
Jenkins is easy to automate and presents a fully self-hosted continuous integration service that is a fantastic alternative to 3rd party (hosted) solutions. It can run just about any task and sit comfortably on a local machine or behind a corporate firewall.
What do you dislike?
As a free (libre) product, the UI in Jenkins leaves a bit to be desired when compared to industry alternatives like Travis. Much of the configuration is bulky, hard to understand, or requires manual intervention via the command line.
What problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?
Both continuous integration (automated code testing and deployment) and environment setup. We've been able to shave not just hours but _weeks_ off our development time by automating common tasks with Jenkins!
Recommendations to others considering the product:
Make sure a sysadmin keeps an eye on the server. Plugin and framework updates are frequent, and once you're hosting your own application, you need to stay ahead of the game with security patches.


    Mykel A.

The way we do CI (at the moment)

  • December 15, 2015
  • Review verified by G2

What do you like best?
We're primarily a maven build shop, so our builds tend to "just work" inside Jenkins.
The plugin architecture is weird but there are a huge pile of them. I've only rarely had to implement my own.

We frequently use Jenkins to provide validation of builds that are too complex to do locally,
What do you dislike?
The interface is very 2005. Better than Bugzilla, at least. The credential management is pretty oddball, but can be figured out.

The quality of 3rd party plugins varies widely from crap to awesome.
What problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?
We're looking for continuous integration testing with multiple slave machines of different capabilities. Jenkins gives this to us essentially for free. We tried Cloudbees but it was difficult to migrate our mechanisms to their hosted environment.
Recommendations to others considering the product:
Make sure your build tools are supported.
User management can be very challenging.


    Siôn l.

Jenkins is highly customisable and good for testing and CI for private repositories.

  • December 15, 2015
  • Review verified by G2

What do you like best?
Jenkins can run on your own infrastructure which makes it ideal for testing and deploying private code for work. It has plugins for all my needs it's highly configurable and was easy to integrate with our gitolite hooks. Complex setups can also be re-used by basing new tasks off existing ones.
What do you dislike?
Configuring tasks can require a lot of clicking in the web GUI which creates a slight administrative overhead when making tasks for many small projects, especially when compared to some simpler tools which read their instructions from a configuration file.
What problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?
Jenkins runs our tests and checks our code quality when our remote repositories receive new commits. It also checks the code is buildable for production releases. This conveniently alerts us if something is wrong, without us having to actively check anything, so we can focus on work.
Recommendations to others considering the product:
Although it is easy to install Jenkins from your distribution, Jenkins is able update itself and thereby get a version likely much fresher than what is initially distributed. Plugins can also be installed and maintained easily in a similar fashion. There are hosted Jenkins services but it's easy enough to set up on-site that I would recommend it.


    Roberto O.

Build all the things1

  • December 14, 2015
  • Review provided by G2

What do you like best?
Jenkins is free, open and has a very huge community behind its back: if you have an issue, you can bet on the fact that there is someone ready to help you . There is no way you have to give up on your plan of building everything with Jenkins as this would not happen. Rock solid, open and spread, One of the best CI ever.
What do you dislike?
Building for the Android platform is easy, once you get up and running. And this is the pain point for most of the user: setting everything up (included the Android SDK) can be hard and time consuming but, if you do not desist, you will surely manage and be able to use Jenkins at the full potential for your builds.
What problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?
In both my previous employments, we were using Jenkins as both CI and Build Automation: I used it with Ant and with Gradle and the tool was really doing its job. Nightly builds, test runs and APK archiving, all automatically whenever you needed, with a release build always ready to be served.
Recommendations to others considering the product:
If you need an open source build system and are not scared from the (maybe) time consuming activity of configuring your builds for each and every platform you develop for, Jenkins is your tool. No one can match its versatility, its reliability and the community behind this software. You will most certainly face issues, but I'm positive about the fact that someone will be ready to help you finding the right path to your solution!


    Yasmany C.

CI made easy

  • December 14, 2015
  • Review provided by G2

What do you like best?
From jenkins i like the plugin platform its really open and from that you can find a lot of great plugins for almost any task integration you will need for build or deploy your solution
What do you dislike?
The user interface is not as friendly as could be
What problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?
From CI to CD our company use jenkins to integrate all the teams, developers can test the bleeding edge of the code and release to the next stage so QA can perform additional testing and certification so they can also deploy to the next stage and so on