AWS DevOps Blog

Customer Highlights from Around the Web: July 2014

by Evan Brown | on | Permalink | Comments |  Share

Here’s a brief summary of some interesting technical posts from customers using AWS Elastic Beanstalk and OpsWorks that were published in July. If we missed your post – or you’d like to be included in next month’s roundup – shoot me an e-mail at evbrown at amazon.com Elastic Beanstalk Continuous Delivery Using Shippable and AWS Elastic […]

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Using New Relic to monitor applications on AWS OpsWorks

A good practice for maintaining highly available applications is to monitor the metrics that impact performance and service levels. AWS OpsWorks includes built-in integration with 14 Amazon CloudWatch metrics, including load, CPU and memory, but you may also want to monitor other metrics such as disk space utilization or application-level metrics such as error rates. […]

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View CloudFormation Logs in the Console

Background AWS CloudFormation simplifies provisioning and management on AWS. You can templatize the service and application architectures you want, and have CloudFormation use the templates for quick and reliable provisioning of the services or applications as ‘stacks’. You can also easily update or replicate the stacks as needed. Inside the CloudFormation templates, you can configure the […]

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Customer Highlights from Around the Web: June 2014

by Evan Brown | on | Permalink | Comments |  Share

June was an exciting month with a number of interesting, technical posts from customers using AWS Elastic Beanstalk and OpsWorks. We’ve aggregated some of these posts and grouped them by service below. If we missed your post – or you’d like to be included in next month’s roundup – shoot me an e-mail at evbrown […]

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Using Amazon CloudWatch Logs with AWS OpsWorks

by Chris Barclay | on | in How-To* | Permalink | Comments |  Share

It is often useful to be able to store log files in a central place for easy access and reporting. Amazon CloudWatch Logs is a new service that is designed to help you monitor, store, and access your system, application, and custom log files from Amazon EC2 instances. For example, you can monitor application logs […]

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Using New T2 Instances With an Existing Elastic Beanstalk App

by Evan Brown | on | Permalink | Comments |  Share

Today’s post comes from Sebastien, Technical Trainer for AWS. Based in Luxembourg, he helps our customers and partners gain proficiency with AWS services and solutions. You can follow him on Twitter @sebsto. Earlier this week Amazon announced the availability of T2 instances for EC2. T2 instances are a new low-cost, general purpose type that are designed to […]

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Locally Packaging Gem Dependencies for Ruby Applications in Elastic Beanstalk

Today’s guest post is by Charlie Crawford, a developer on the Elastic Beanstalk team. The Puma Ruby 2 container has a built-in feature to detect locally installed gems. This feature is easy to use, ensures that your production environment is using the same gems as your development environment, and helps your application deploy faster. Although this […]

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Build and Deploy a Federated Web Identity application with AWS Elastic Beanstalk and Login with Amazon.

Today’s post comes from Sebastien, Technical Trainer for AWS. Based in Luxembourg, he helps our customers and partners gain proficiency with AWS services and solutions. You can follow him on Twitter @sebsto. This article describes why and how your applications can take advantage of Web Identity Federation and how to deploy such applications on Elastic Beanstalk. In […]

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Dockerizing a Python Web App

A few weeks ago Elastic Beanstalk announced support for deploying and managing Docker containers in the AWS cloud. In this post we’ll walk through Dockerizing a simple signup form web app originally written for the Elastic Beanstalk Python environment. About the Signup Form App We built and blogged about this app a few months ago. […]

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Customizing AWS OpsWorks with Attributes

by Chris Barclay | on | in How-To* | Permalink | Comments |  Share

There are a number of ways to customize Amazon EC2 instances using AWS OpsWorks. In a previous blog we demonstrated some easy ways to customize OpsWorks by writing your own recipes. In this blog we’re going to show how to use Chef attributes to customize recipes. Chef attributes are input parameters to Chef recipes. The […]

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