AWS Compute Blog

Category: Amazon EC2

Introducing the capacity-optimized allocation strategy for Amazon EC2 Spot Instances

AWS announces the new capacity-optimized allocation strategy for Amazon EC2 Auto Scaling and EC2 Fleet. This new strategy automatically makes the most efficient use of spare capacity while still taking advantage of the steep discounts offered by Spot Instances. It’s a new way for you to gain easy access to extra EC2 compute capacity in […]

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Optimizing Amazon ECS task density using awsvpc network mode

This post is contributed by Tony Pujals | Senior Developer Advocate, AWS   AWS recently increased the number of elastic network interfaces available when you run tasks on Amazon ECS. Use the account setting called awsvpcTrunking. If you use the Amazon EC2 launch type and task networking (awsvpc network mode), you can now run more […]

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Using AWS App Mesh with Fargate

This post is contributed by Tony Pujals | Senior Developer Advocate, AWS   AWS App Mesh is a service mesh, which provides a framework to control and monitor services spanning multiple AWS compute environments. My previous post provided a walkthrough to get you started. In it, I showed deploying a simple microservice application to Amazon ECS […]

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New: Using Amazon EC2 Instance Connect for SSH access to your EC2 Instances

This post is courtesy of Saloni Sonpal – Senior Product Manager – Amazon EC2 Today, AWS is introducing Amazon EC2 Instance Connect, a new way to control SSH access to your EC2 instances using AWS Identity and Access Management (IAM). About Amazon EC2 Instance Connect While infrastructure as code (IaC) tools such as Chef and Puppet […]

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Optimizing Network Intensive Workloads on Amazon EC2 A1 Instances

This post courtesy of Ali Saidi, AWS, Principal Engineer At re:Invent 2018, AWS announced the Amazon EC2 A1 instance. The A1 instances are powered by our internally developed Arm-based AWS Graviton processors and are up to 45% less expensive than other instance types with the same number of vCPUs and DRAM. These instances are based […]

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Getting started with the A1 instance

This post courtesy of Ali Saidi, AWS, Principal Engineer At re:Invent 2018 AWS announced the Amazon EC2 A1 instance. These instances are based on the AWS Nitro System that powers all of our latest generation of instances, and are the first instance types powered by the AWS Graviton Processor. These processors feature 64-bit Arm Neoverse […]

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Running your game servers at scale for up to 90% lower compute cost

This post is contributed by Yahav Biran, Chad Schmutzer, and Jeremy Cowan, Solutions Architects at AWS Many successful video games such Fortnite: Battle Royale, Warframe, and Apex Legends use a free-to-play model, which offers players access to a portion of the game without paying. Such games are no longer low quality and require premium-like quality. […]

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Learn about hourly-replication in Server Migration Service and the ability to migrate large data volumes

This post courtesy of Shane Baldacchino, AWS Solutions Architect AWS Server Migration Service (AWS SMS) is an agentless service that makes it easier and faster for you to migrate thousands of on-premises workloads to AWS. AWS SMS allows you to automate, schedule, and track incremental replications of live server volumes, making it easier for you […]

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Amazon ElastiCache performance boost with Amazon EC2 M5 and R5 instances

Contributed by Ruchita Arora, Sr. Product Manager, Allen Farris, Software Dev Engineer, and Itay Maoz, Sr. Software Engineering Manager Earlier this year, Amazon EC2 introduced two exciting new instance families, M5 and R5. These instances are based on the new AWS Nitro system, a combination of dedicated hardware and lightweight hypervisor that aims to deliver […]

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Deploying a Burstable and Event-driven HPC Cluster on AWS Using SLURM, Part 2

Contributed by Amr Ragab, HPC Application Consultant, AWS Professional Services In part 1 of this series, you deployed the base components to create the HPC cluster. This unique deployment stands up the SLURM headnode. For every job submitted to the queue, the headnode provisions the needed compute resources to run the job, based on job […]

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