AWS Database Blog

Category: DynamoDB

Performing a Live Migration from a MongoDB Cluster to Amazon DynamoDB

Migrating data from one database to other can be quite challenging with respect to data consistency, downtime of applications, and key design differences between the target and source databases. AWS Data Migration Service (AWS DMS) helps you migrate databases like MongoDB, Oracle, MySQL, and Microsoft SQL Server to AWS quickly, securely, and seamlessly. The source […]

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A serverless solution to schedule your Amazon DynamoDB On-Demand Backup

We recently released On-Demand Backup for Amazon DynamoDB. Using On-Demand Backup, you can create full backups of your DynamoDB tables, helping you meet your corporate and governmental regulatory requirements for data archiving. Now you can back up any table from a few megabytes to hundreds of terabytes of data in size, with the same performance […]

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AWS Database Migration Service and Amazon DynamoDB: What You Need to Know

This post describes the performance aspects of migrating data to Amazon DynamoDB using AWS DMS, minimizing downtime, and converting the data that is more suitable for DynamoDB using either map to record or map to document types.

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Migrate Delimited Files from Amazon S3 to an Amazon DynamoDB NoSQL Table Using AWS Database Migration Service and AWS CloudFormation

Introduction Recently, AWS Database Migration Services (AWS DMS) added support for using Amazon S3 as a source for your database migration. This new support means that you can now load data in comma-separated value (CSV) format from S3 into any supported target, whether or not the target has native S3 support. In most cases, when […]

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Querying on Multiple Attributes in Amazon DynamoDB

Amazon DynamoDB is a non-relational key/value store database that provides incredible single-digit millisecond response times for reading or writing, and is unbounded by scaling issues. But as in any key/value store, it can be tricky to store data in a way that allows you to retrieve it efficiently. The most efficient method is to fetch […]

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Building Distributed Locks with the DynamoDB Lock Client

Alexander Patrikalakis and Sasha Slutsker are senior software development engineers with Amazon. TL;DR At Amazon, teams all across the company build upon AWS services just like AWS’s external customers. Here we have a contribution from Alex and Sasha, who work on teams supporting Amazon.com about a new client library that they developed to make their […]

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DynamoDB Streams Use Cases and Design Patterns

Gowri Balasubramanian is a solutions architect at Amazon Web Services. This post describes some common use cases you might encounter, along with their design options and solutions, when migrating data from relational data stores to Amazon DynamoDB. We will consider how to manage the following scenarios: How do you set up a relationship across multiple […]

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Amazon DynamoDB Accelerator (DAX): A Read-Through/Write-Through Cache for DynamoDB

Joseph Idziorek is a product manager at Amazon Web Services. AWS recently launched Amazon DynamoDB Accelerator (DAX), a highly available, in-memory cache for Amazon DynamoDB. If you’re currently using DynamoDB or considering DynamoDB, DAX can offer you response times in microseconds and millions of requests per second. When developers start using DAX, they tell us […]

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Automatically Archive Items to S3 Using DynamoDB Time to Live (TTL) with AWS Lambda and Amazon Kinesis Firehose

Adam Wagner is a solutions architect at Amazon Web Services. Earlier this year, Amazon DynamoDB released Time to Live (TTL) functionality, which automatically deletes expired items from your tables, at no additional cost. TTL eliminates the complexity and cost of scanning tables and deleting items that you don’t want to retain, saving you money on […]

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Z-Order Indexing for Multifaceted Queries in Amazon DynamoDB: Part 1

Zack Slayton  is a software development engineer at Amazon TL;DR Using Z-order indexing, you can efficiently run range queries on any combination of fields in your schema. Although Amazon DynamoDB doesn’t natively support Z-order indexing, you can implement the functionality entirely from the client side. A single Z-order index can outperform and even replace entire […]

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