Q: Which operating systems does an Application Load Balancer support?
An Application Load Balancer supports targets with any operating system currently supported by the Amazon EC2 service.

Q: Which protocols does an Application load balancer support?
An Application Load Balancer supports load balancing of applications using HTTP and HTTPS (Secure HTTP) protocols.

Q: Is HTTP/2 Supported on an Application load balancer?
Yes. HTTP/2 support is enabled natively on an Application Load Balancer. Clients that support HTTP/2 can connect to an Application Load Balancer over TLS.

Q: What TCP ports can I use to load balance?
You can perform load balancing for the following TCP ports: 1-65535

Q: Is WebSockets supported on an Application Load Balancer?
Yes. WebSockets and Secure WebSockets support is available natively and ready for use on an Application Load Balancer.

Q: Is Request tracing supported on an Application Load Balancer?
Yes. Request tracing is enabled by default on your Application Load Balancer.

Q: Does an Application Load Balancer support EC2-Classic?
No.

Q: Will my existing load balancers (Classic Load Balancers) have the same features and benefits of an Application Load Balancer?
While there is some overlap, we do not plan to maintain feature parity between the two types of load balancers. Application Load Balancers are the foundation of our application layer load-balancing platform for the future.

Q: Can I configure my Amazon EC2 instances to accept traffic only from my Application Load Balancers?
Yes.

Q: Can I configure a security group for the front-end of an Application Load Balancer?
Yes.

Q: Can I use the existing APIs that I use with my Classic Load Balancer with an Application Load Balancer?
No. Application Load Balancers require a new set of APIs.

Q: How do I manage both Application and Standard Load Balancers simultaneously?
The ELB Console will allow you to manage Application and Classic Load Balancers from the same interface. If you are using the CLI or an SDK, you will use a different ‘service’ for Application Load Balancers. For example, in the CLI you will describe your Classic Load Balancers using `aws elb describe-load-balancers` and your Application Load Balancers using `aws elbv2 describe-load-balancers`.

Q: Can I convert my Classic Load Balancer to an Application Load Balancer (and vice versa)?
No, you cannot convert one load balancer type into another.

Q: How do I migrate to an Application Load Balancer?
Attach the same back-end instances to both a Classic Load Balancer and an Application Load Balancer simultaneously. This allows you to migrate traffic from one endpoint to another without altering their existing stack. Be sure to test the behavior of the application on the new platform before changing DNS to point to the Application Load Balancer.

Q: Can I use an Application Load Balancer as a Layer-4 load balancer?
No. If you need Layer-4 features, you should continue to use Classic Load Balancers.

Q: Can I use a single Application Load Balancer for handling HTTP and HTTPS requests?
Yes, you can add listeners for HTTP port 80 and HTTPS port 443 to a single Application Load Balancer.

Q: Can I get a history of Application Load Balancing API calls made on my account for security analysis and operational troubleshooting purposes?
Yes. To receive a history of Application Load Balancing API calls made on your account, use AWS CloudTrail.

Q: Does an Application Load Balancer support HTTPS termination?
Yes, you can terminate HTTPS connection on the Application Load Balancer. You must install an SSL certificate on your load balancer. The load balancer uses this certificate to terminate the connection and then decrypt requests from clients before sending them to targets.

Q: What are the steps to get a SSL certificate?
You can either use AWS Certificate Manager to provision an SSL/TLS certificate or you can obtain the certificate from other sources by creating the certificate request, getting the certificate request signed by a CA, and then uploading the certificate using the AWS Identity and Access Management (IAM) service.

Q: How does an Application Load Balancer integrate with AWS Certificate Manager (ACM)?
An Application Load Balancer is integrated with AWS Certificate Management (ACM). Integration with ACM makes it very simple to bind a certificate to the load balancer thereby making the entire SSL offload process very easy. Purchasing, uploading, and renewing SSL/TLS certificates is a time-consuming manual and complex process. With ACM integration with Application Load Balancer, this whole process has been shortened to simply requesting a trusted SSL/TLS certificate and selecting the ACM certificate to provision it with the load balancer.

Q: Is back-end server authentication supported with an Application Load Balancer?
No, only encryption is supported to the back-ends with an Application Load Balancer.

Q: Is IPv6 supported with an Application Load Balancer?
Yes, IPv6 is supported with an Application Load Balancer.

Q: How do you set up rules on an Application Load Balancer?
You can configure rules for each of your listeners you configure for the load balancer. The rules include a condition and a corresponding action if the condition is satisfied. The condition will be a path URL path of a service (e.g. /img) and action is forward. Once you have set this up, the load balancer will use the rules to determine the service to which the request must be routed.

Q: Are there limits on the resources for an Application Load Balancer?
Your AWS account has these limits for an Application Load Balancer.

Q. How can I protect my web applications behind a Load Balancer from web attacks?
You can integrate your Application Load Balancer with AWS WAF, a web application firewall that helps protect web applications from attacks by allowing you to configure rules based on IP addresses, HTTP headers, and custom URI strings. Using these rules, AWS WAF can block, allow, or monitor (count) web requests for your web application. Please see AWS WAF Developer Guide for more information.

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Q: How does Application load balancer pricing work?
You are charged for each hour or partial hour that an Application load balancer is running and the number of Load Balancer Capacity Units (LCU) used per hour.

Q: What is a Load Balancer Capacity Unit (LCU)?
An LCU is a new metric for determining how you pay for an Application load balancer. An LCU defines the maximum resource consumed in any one of the dimensions (new connections, active connections, and bandwidth) the Application load balancer processes your traffic.

Q: Will I be billed on Classic load balancers by LCU?
No. Classic load balancers will continue to be billed for bandwidth and hourly usage.

Q: How do I know the number of LCUs an Application load balancer is using?
We will expose the usage of all the three dimensions that constitutes a LCU via CloudWatch.

Q: Will I be billed on all the dimensions in an LCU?
No. The number of LCUs per hour will be determined based on maximum resource consumed amongst the three dimensions that constitutes a LCU.

Q: Will I be billed on partial LCUs?
Yes.

Q: How does the LCU billing work if I am using a 4k certificate?
For applications using a 4K certificate, an LCU will constitute either 5 new connections per second, 3000 active connections per hour, or 2.22 Mbps. You will be charged for maximum resources consumed in any one dimension per hour.

Q: Is a free tier offered on an Application load balancer for new AWS accounts?
Yes. For new AWS accounts, a free tier for an Application load balancer offers 750 hours and 15 LCUs. This free tier offer is only available to new AWS customers, and is available for 12 months following your AWS sign-up date.

Q: Can I use a combination of Application load balancer and Classic load balancer as part of my free tier?
Yes. You can use both Classic and Application load balancers for 15GB and 15 LCUs respectively. The 750 load balancer hours are shared between both Classic and Application load balancers.