With Application, Network, Gateway, and Classic Load Balancers, you only pay for what you use. See FAQs for details.

Application Load Balancer

You are charged for each hour or partial hour that an Application Load Balancer is running and the number of Load Balancer Capacity Units (LCU) used per hour.

Network Load Balancer

You are charged for each hour or partial hour that a Network Load Balancer is running and the number of Network Load Balancer Capacity Units (NLCU) used by Network Load Balancer per hour.

Gateway Load Balancer

You are charged for each hour or partial hour that a Gateway Load Balancer is running and the number of Gateway Load Balancer Capacity Units (GLCU) used by Gateway Load Balancer per hour. Gateway Load Balancer uses Gateway Load Balancer Endpoint (GWLBE), a new type of VPC Endpoint powered by AWS PrivateLink technology that simplifies how applications can securely exchange traffic with GWLB across VPC boundaries. GWLBE is priced and billed separately (learn more).

Classic Load Balancer

You are charged for each hour or partial hour that a Classic Load Balancer is running and for each GB of data transferred through your load balancer.

  • Application Load Balancer
  • Network Load Balancer
  • Gateway Load Balancer
  • Classic Load Balancer
  • Application Load Balancer
  • Except as otherwise noted, our prices are exclusive of applicable taxes and duties, including VAT and applicable sales tax. For customers with a Japanese billing address, use of AWS is subject to Japanese Consumption Tax. Learn more.

    LCU Details

    An LCU measures the dimensions on which the Application Load Balancer processes your traffic (averaged over an hour). The four dimensions measured are:

    • New connections: Number of newly established connections per second. Typically, many requests are sent per connection.
    • Active connections: Number of active connections per minute.
    • Processed bytes: The number of bytes processed by the load balancer in Gigabytes (GB) for HTTP(S) requests and responses.
    • Rule evaluations: It is the product of number of rules processed by your load balancer and the request rate. The first 10 processed rules are free (Rule evaluations = Request rate * (Number of rules processed - 10 free rules)

    You are charged only on the dimension with the highest usage. An LCU contains:

    • 25 new connections per second.
    • 3,000 active connections per minute.
    • 1 GB per hour for EC2 instances, containers and IP addresses as targets and 0.4 GB per hour for Lambda functions as targets
    • 1,000 rule evaluations per second

    Amazon EC2 service fees apply and are billed separately.
    Note 1: For HTTPS listeners, 25 new connections/sec for LCU computation is applicable for RSA certificates with key size <=2K and ECDSA certificates with key size <=256. For certificates with larger key sizes, please refer to the pricing FAQs. Note 2: If you have 10 or fewer rules configured, the rule evaluations dimension is ignored in LCU computation.


    Pricing Examples

    Pricing example 1

    Let’s assume your application receives an average of 1 new connection per second, each lasting 2 minutes. A client sends an average of 5 requests per second and the total processed bytes for requests and responses is 300 KB per second. You have configured 60 rules on the load balancer to route your client requests. We calculate your monthly Application Load Balancer costs using pricing in the US-East-1 Region as follows:

    • New connections (per second): Each LCU provides 25 new connections per second (averaged over the hour). Since your application receives 1 new connection per second, this translates to 0.04 LCUs (1 connection per second / 25 connections per second)
    • Active connections (per minute): Each LCU provides 3,000 active connections per minute. Your application receives 1 new connection per second, each lasting 2 minutes. This translates to 120 active connections per minute, or 0.04 LCUs (120 active connections per minute / 3,000 active connections per minute)
    • Processed Bytes (GBs per hour): Each LCU provides 1 GB of processed bytes per hour. Since each client connection transfers 300 KB of data per second, it translates to 1.08 GB per hour or 1.08 LCUs (1.08 GB/1 GB).
    • Rule Evaluations (per second): For simplicity, assume that all configured rules are processed for a request. Each LCU provides 1,000 rule evaluations per second (averaged over the hour). Since your application receives 5 requests/sec, 60 processed rules for each request results in a maximum 250 rule evaluations per second (60 processed rules – 10 free rules) * 5 or 0.25 LCU (250 rule evaluations per second / 1,000 rule evaluations per second)

    Using these values, the hourly bill is calculated by taking the maximum LCUs consumed across the four dimensions. In this example, the processed bytes dimension (1.08 LCUs) is greater than new connections (0.04 LCUs), active connections (0.04 LCUs), and rule evaluations (0.25 LCU) resulting in a total charge of $0.00864 per hour (1.08 LCUs * $0.008 per LCU) or $6.22 per month ($0.00864 * 24 hours * 30 days).

    Adding the hourly charge of $0.0225, the total Application Load Balancer costs are:

    • $0.03114 per hour ($0.0225 hourly charge + $0.00864 LCU charge); or
    • $22.42 per month ($0.03114 * 24 hours * 30 days).
    Pricing example 2

    Let’s assume that your mobile application receives an average 100 new connections per second, each lasting 3 minutes. A client sends an average of 4 requests per second per connection and 1,000 bytes are processed per connection. You have configured 20 rules on the load balancer to route your client requests. We calculate your monthly Application Load balancer costs using pricing in the US-East Region as follows:

    • New connections (per second): Each LCU provides 25 connections per second. Since our mobile application uses 100 new connections per second, this translates to 4 LCUs (100 connections per second / 25 connections per second)
    • Active connections (per minute): Each LCU provides 3,000 active connections per minute. Since your mobile application receives 100 new connections per second, each lasting 3 minutes, this translates to 18,000 maximum active connections per minute, or 6 LCUs (18,000 active connections per minute / 3,000 active connections per minute)
    • Processed bytes (GBs per hour): Each LCU provides 1 GB per hour. Since our mobile application transfers 1,000 bytes of data per connection on average, it translates to 0.36 GB per hour, or 0.36 LCUs (0.36 GB/1 GB).
    • Rule evaluations (per second): Each LCU provides 1,000 rule evaluations per second. Since your application receives 4 requests/sec per connection, it translates to 400 requests/sec across all connections. With 20 configured rules this results in a maximum of 4,000 rule evaluations per second (20 configured rules – 10 free rules)* 400 or 4 LCUs (4,000 rule evaluations per second / 1,000 rule evaluations per second)

    Using these values, the hourly bill is calculated by taking the maximum LCUs consumed across the four dimensions. In this example, the active connections (6 LCUs) is greater than the new connections (4 LCUs), bandwidth (0.36 LCUs) and rule evaluations (4 LCUs). This results in a total charge of $0.048 per hour (6 LCUs * $0.008) or $34.56 per month ($0.048 * 24 hours * 30 days).

    Adding an hourly charge of $0.0225, the total Application Load Balancer costs are:

    • $0.0705 per hour ($0.0225 hourly charge + $0.048 LCU charge); or
    • $50.76 per month ($0.0705 * 24 hours * 30 days).
    Pricing example 3: Application Load Balancer with Lambda targets only

    Let’s assume your application receives an average of 100 new connections per second and each connection lasts 200 milliseconds. A client sends an average of 100 requests per second and 14 KB are the processed bytes for Lambda requests and responses for duration of the connection. You have configured 20 rules on the load balancer to route your client requests. We calculate your monthly Application Load Balancer costs using pricing in the US-East-1 Region as follows:

    • New connections (per second): Each LCU provides 25 new connections per second (averaged over the hour). Since your application receives 100 new connection per second, this translates to 4 LCUs (100 connection per second / 25 connections per second)
    • Active connections (per minute): Each LCU provides 3,000 active connections per minute. Your application receives 100 new connection per second, each lasting 200 milliseconds. This translates to 100 active connections per minute, or 0.03 LCUs (100 active connections per minute / 3,000 active connections per minute)
    • Processed bytes (GBs per hour): Each LCU provides 0.4 GB per hour for Lambda traffic. Since each client connection transfers 14KB of data on average, it translates 5.04 GB per hour (14KB processed bytes per request+ response *100 requests per second*3600 seconds) or 12.6 LCUs (5.04 GB/0.4 GB) per hour.
    • Rule Evaluations (per second): For simplicity, assume that all configured rules are processed for a request. Each LCU provides 1,000 rule evaluations per second (averaged over the hour). Since your application receives 100 requests/sec, 20 processed rules for each request results in a maximum 1000 rule evaluations per second (20 processed rules – 10 free rules) * 100 or 1 LCU (1000 rule evaluations per second / 1,000 rule evaluations per second).

    In this case the dimension with the most LCU usage is processed bytes dimension and hence we will use the LCU usage for processed bytes dimension in our billing calculation. The hourly LCU charge is $0.1008 (12.6 LCUs*0.008 per LCU). Adding the hourly charge of $0.0225, the total Application Load Balancer costs are:

    • $0.1233 per hour ($0.0225 hourly charge + $0.1008 LCU charge); or
    • $88.78 per month ($0.1233 * 24 hours * 30 days).

    100 requests per second translates to 259.2 million (100*3600*24*30) requests per month. This translates to $0.34/million requests ($88.78/259.2).

    Pricing example 4: Application Load Balancer with both EC2 and Lambda targets

    Let’s assume your application receives an average of 1 new connection per second, each lasting 2 minutes. A client sends an average of 50 requests per seconds. The total bidirectional bytes transferred through the load balancer for each request/response is 10 KB. On an average 60% of the requests are served by EC2 instances as targets and 40% by Lambda functions as targets. You have configured 50 rules on the load balancer to route your client requests. We calculate your monthly Application Load Balancer costs using pricing in the US-East-1 Region as follows:

    • New connections (per second): Each LCU provides 25 new connections per second (averaged over the hour). Since your application receives 1 new connection per second, this translates to 0.04 LCUs (1 connection per second / 25 connections per second)
    • Active connections (per minute): Each LCU provides 3,000 active connections per minute. Your application receives 1 new connection per second, each lasting 2 minutes. This translates to 120 active connections per minute, or 0.04 LCUs (120 active connections per minute / 3,000 active connections per minute)
    • Processed bytes (GBs per hour): Each LCU provides 1 GB of processed bytes per hour for EC2 targets. Since each client connection transfers 300 KB of data on average for EC2 instance as target it translates to 1.08 GB per hour or 1.08 LCUs (1.08 GB/1 GB) for EC2 targets. Each LCU provides 0.4 GB of processed bytes for Lambda targets. Since each client connection transfers 200 KB for Lambda targets, it translates to 0.72 GB per hour or 1.8 LCUs (0.72 GB/ 0.4 GB) for Lambda targets. The total LCU usage for processed bytes dimension across EC2 and Lambda targets is 2.88 LCUs.
    • Rule Evaluations (per second): For simplicity, assume that all configured rules are processed for a request. Each LCU provides 1,000 rule evaluations per second (averaged over the hour). Since your application receives 50 requests/sec, 50 processed rules for each request results in a maximum 2000 rule evaluations per second (50 processed rules – 10 free rules) * 50 or 2.00 LCUs (2000 rule evaluations per second / 1,000 rule evaluations per second)

    Using these values, the hourly bill is calculated by taking the maximum LCUs consumed across the four dimensions. In this example, the LCU usage for processed bytes dimension (2.88 LCUs) is greater than new connections (0.04 LCUs), active connections (0.04 LCUs), and rule evaluations (2.00 LCU) resulting in a total charge of $0.0230 per hour (2.88 LCUs * $0.008 per LCU) or $16.56 per month ($0.0230 * 24 hours * 30 days).

    Adding the hourly charge of $0.0225, the total Application Load Balancer costs are:

    • $0.0455 per hour ($0.0225 hourly charge + $0.0230 LCU charge); or
    • $32.76 per month ($0.0455 * 24 hours * 30 days)

    The load balancer receives 20 requests per second for Lambda targets and it translates to about 51.8 million requests per month. Your monthly LCU usage cost for Lambda requests is $10.37 (1.8 LCU/Hour* 24 hours * 30 days* $0.008 per LCU charge). This translates to $0.20 per million requests as LCU usage costs for Lambda targets.

  • Network Load Balancer
  • Except as otherwise noted, our prices are exclusive of applicable taxes and duties, including VAT and applicable sales tax. For customers with a Japanese billing address, use of AWS is subject to Japanese Consumption Tax. Learn more.

    Network Load Balancer LCU Details

    An NLCU measures the dimensions on which the Network Load Balancer processes your traffic (averaged over an hour). The three dimensions measured are:

    • New connections or flows: Number of newly established connections/flows per second. Many technologies (HTTP, WebSockets, etc.) reuse Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) connections for efficiency. The number of new connections is typically lower than your request or message count.
    • Active connections or flows: Peak concurrent connections/flows, sampled minutely.
    • Processed bytes: The number of bytes processed by the load balancer in Gigabytes (GB).

    You are charged only on one of the three dimensions that has the highest usage for the hour.

    For TCP traffic, a Network Load Balancer LCU (NLCU) contains:

    • 800 new TCP connections per second.
    • 100,000 active TCP connections (sampled per minute).
    • 1 GB per hour for EC2 instances, containers and IP addresses as targets.

    For UDP traffic, a Network Load Balancer LCU (NLCU) contains:

    • 400 new UDP flows per second.
    • 50,000 active UDP flows (sampled per minute).
    • 1 GB per hour for EC2 instances, containers and IP addresses as targets.

    For TLS traffic, a Network Load Balancer LCU (NLCU) contains:

    • 50 new TLS connections or flows per second.
    • 3,000 active TLS connections or flows (sampled per minute).
    • 1 GB per hour for EC2 instances, containers and IP addresses as targets.

    TCP and UDP traffic refers to the traffic destined for any TCP/UDP listener on your Network Load Balancer while TLS traffic refers to the traffic destined for any TLS listener on your Network Load Balancer.

    Amazon EC2 service fees apply and are billed separately.


    Pricing Examples

    Pricing example 1

    Let’s assume your application receives 1 new TCP connection per second, each lasting 2 minutes and consuming 300 KB in processed bytes. We calculate your monthly Network Load Balancer costs using pricing in the US-East-1 Region as follows:

    • New connections or flows for TCP traffic: each NLCU provides up to 800 new connections per second. Since your application receives 1 new connection per second, this translates to 0.00125 NLCUs (1 connection per second / 800 connections per second);
    • Active connections/flows for TCP traffic: each NLCU provides up to 100,000 active connections per minute. Your application receives 1 new connection per second, each lasting 2 minutes. This translates to 120 active connections, or 0.0012 NLCUs (120 active connections / 100,000 active connections);
    • Bytes processed for TCP traffic: each NLCU provides 1GB. Since on average, each client connection transfers 300 KB in bandwidth, this translates to 1.08 GB per hour or 1.08 LCUs (1.08 GB/1 GB).

    Using these values, the hourly bill is calculated by taking the maximum NLCUs consumed across the three dimensions and averaged over the hour. In this example, the Bytes processed dimension (1.08 NLCUs) is greater than both the new connections (0.00125 NLCUs) and active connections (0.0012 NLCUs). Assuming this usage is consistent over 60 minutes, this results in a total charge of $0.00648 per hour (1.08 NLCUs * $0.006 per NLCU) or $4.67 per month ($0.00648 * 24 hours * 30 days).

    Adding the hourly charge of $0.0225, the total Network Load Balancer costs are:

    • $0.0289 per hour ($0.0225 hourly charge + $0.00648 NLCU charge); or
    • $20.86 per month ($0.0289 * 24 hours * 30 days).
    Pricing example 2

    Let’s assume that your mobile application receives 100 new TCP connections per second and 100 new TLS connections per second, each lasting 3 minutes and consuming 1,000 processed bytes. We calculate our monthly Network Load Balancer costs using pricing in the US-East Region as follows:

    TCP Traffic

    • New connections/flows for TCP traffic: each NLCU provides 800 TCP connections per second. Since our mobile application uses 100 new TCP connections per second, this translates to 0.125 NLCUs (100 connections per second / 800 connections per second);
    • Active connections/flows for TCP traffic: each NLCU provides 100,000 active TCP connections per minute. Since our mobile application receives 100 new TCP connections per second, each lasting 3 minutes, this translates to 18,000 maximum active TCP connections, or 0.18 NLCUs (18,000 active connections / 100,000 active connections);
    • Processed Bytes for TCP Traffic: each NLCU provides 1GB per hour. Since on average our mobile application transfers 1,000 processed bytes for each TCP client connection, this translates to 0.36 GB per hour, or 0.360 NLCUs (0.36 GB / 1GB) across all connections.

    TLS Traffic

    • New connections/flows for TLS traffic: each NLCU provides 50 TLS connections per second. Since our mobile application uses 100 new TLS connections per second, this translates to 2 NLCUs (100 connections per second / 50 connections per second);
    • Active connections/flows for TLS traffic: each NLCU provides 3,000 active TLS connections per minute. Since our mobile application receives 100 new TLS connections per second, each lasting 3 minutes, this translates to 18,000 active connections, or 6 NLCUs (18,000 active connections / 3,000 active connections);
    • Bandwidth for TLS Traffic: each NLCU provides 1GB per hour. Since on average our mobile application transfers 1,000 processed bytes for each TLS client connection, this translates to 0.36 GB per hour, or 0.36 NLCUs (0.36 GB /1 GB) across all connections.

    Using these values, the hourly bill is calculated by taking the maximum NLCUs consumed across the three dimensions and averaged over the hour for both TCP connections and TLS connections.

    In this example for TCP traffic, the processed bytes (0.36 NLCUs) is greater than both the new connections (0.125 NLCUs) and active connections (0.18 NLCUs). Assuming this usage is consistent over 60 minutes, this results in a total charge of $0.00216 per hour for TCP traffic (0.36 NLCUs * $0.006) or $1.55 per month for TCP Traffic ($0.00216 * 24 hours * 30 days).

    In this example for TLS traffic, the active connections (6 NLCUs) is greater than both the new connections (2NLCUs) and processed bytes (0.36 NLCUs). Assuming this usage is consistent over 60 minutes, this results in a total charge of $0.036 per hour for TLS traffic (6 NLCUs * 0.006) or $25.92 per month for TLS traffic ($0.036*24*30).

    Adding the hourly charge of $0.0225 and the usage charges for TCP traffic and TLS traffic total Network Load Balancer costs are:

    • $0.060 per hour ($0.0225 hourly charge + $0.00216 NLCU charge for TCP traffic + $0.036 NLCU charge for TLS traffic); or
    • $43.20 per month ($0.060 * 24 hours * 30 days).
    Pricing example 3

    Let’s assume that your mobile application receives 100 new TCP connections per second and 100 new UDP flows per second, the TCP connections is lasting 3 minutes and consuming 1,000 processed bytes while the UDP flow is lasting 2 minutes and consuming 1000 bytes. We calculate our monthly Network Load Balancer costs using pricing in the US-East Region as follows:

    TCP Traffic

    • New connections/flows for TCP traffic: each NLCU provides 800 TCP connections per second. Since our mobile application uses 100 new TCP connections per second, this translates to 0.125 NLCUs (100 connections per second / 800 connections per second);
    • Active connections/flows for TCP traffic: each NLCU provides 100,000 active TCP connections per minute. Since our mobile application receives 100 new TCP connections per second, each lasting 3 minutes, this translates to 18,000 maximum active TCP connections, or 0.18 NLCUs (18,000 active connections / 100,000 active connections);
    • Processed Bytes for TCP Traffic: each NLCU provides 1GB per hour. Since on average our mobile application transfers 1,000 processed bytes for each TCP client connection, this translates to 0.36 GB per hour, or 0.360 NLCUs (0.36 GB / 1GB) across all connections.

    UDP Traffic

    • New flows for UDP traffic: each NLCU provides 400 UDP flows per second. Since our mobile application uses 100 new UDP flows per second, this translates to 0.25 NLCUs (100 flows per second / 400 connections per second);
    • Active flows for UDP traffic: each NLCU provides 50,000 active UDP flows per minute. Since our mobile application receives 100 new UDP flows per second, each lasting 120 seconds, which translates to 12,000 active flows, or 0.24 NLCUs (12,000 active flows / 50,000 active connections);
    • Processed Bytes for UDP Traffic: each NLCU provides 1GB per hour. Since on average our mobile application transfers 1,000 processed bytes for each UDP client flow, this translates to 0.36 GB per hour, or 0.36 NLCUs (0.36 GB /1 GB) across all UDP flows.

    Using these values, the hourly bill is calculated by taking the maximum NLCUs consumed across the three dimensions for each protocol.

    In this example for TCP traffic, the processed bytes (0.36 NLCUs) is greater than both the new connections (0.125 NLCUs) and active connections (0.18 NLCUs). Assuming this usage is consistent over 60 minutes, this results in a total charge of $0.00216 per hour for TCP traffic (0.36 NLCUs * $0.006) or $1.55 per month for TCP Traffic ($0.00216 * 24 hours * 30 days).

    For UDP traffic, the processed bytes (0.36 NLCUs) is greater than both the new flows (0.25NLCUs) and active flows (0.24 NLCUs). Assuming this usage is consistent over 60 minutes, this results in a total charge of $0.00216 per hour for UDP traffic (0.36 NLCUs * 0.006) or $1.55 per month for UDP traffic ($0.00216*24*30).

    Adding the hourly charge of $0.0225 and the usage charges for TCP traffic and UDP traffic total Network Load Balancer costs are:

    • $0.02682 per hour ($0.0225 hourly charge + $0.00216 NLCU charge for TCP traffic + $0.00216 NLCU charge for UDP traffic); or
    • $19.31 per month ($0.02682 * 24 hours * 30 days).
  • Gateway Load Balancer
  • Except as otherwise noted, our prices are exclusive of applicable taxes and duties, including VAT and applicable sales tax. For customers with a Japanese billing address, use of AWS is subject to Japanese Consumption Tax. Learn more.

    Gateway Load Balancer LCU Details

    A GLCU measures the dimensions on which the Gateway Load Balancer processes your traffic (averaged over an hour). The three dimensions measured are:

    • New connections or flows: Number of newly established connections/flows per second.
    • Active connections or flows: Peak concurrent connections/flows, sampled minutely.
    • Processed bytes: The number of bytes processed by the load balancer in Gigabytes (GB).

    You are charged only on one of the three dimensions that has the highest usage for the hour. A GLCU contains:

    • 600 new connections/flows per second. 
    • 60,000 active connections/flows (sampled per minute). 
    • 1 GB per hour for EC2 instances, containers and IP addresses as targets.

    Amazon EC2 service fees apply and are billed separately.

    Gateway Load Balancer Endpoint

    Gateway Load Balancer uses Gateway Load Balancer Endpoint (GWLBE), a new type of VPC Endpoint powered by AWS PrivateLink technology that simplifies how applications can securely exchange traffic with GWLB across VPC boundaries. 

    GWLBE is priced and billed separately on the AWS PrivateLink pricing page.

    Pricing Examples

    Example 1

    Let’s assume your single-zone deployment Gateway Load Balancer and Gateway Load Balancer Endpoint each receives 1 new connection per second, each lasting 2 minutes and consuming 300 KB in processed bytes. We calculate your monthly costs using pricing in the US-East Region as follows:

    For one Gateway Load Balancer:

    • New connections or flows (per second): each GLCU provides up to 600 new connections per second. Since your Gateway Load Balancer receives 1 new connection per second, this translates to 0.00167 GLCUs (1 new connection per second / 600 new connections per second).
    • Active connections or flows (per minute): each GLCU provides up to 60,000 active connections per minute. Your Gateway Load Balancer receives 1 new connection per second, each lasting 2 minutes. This translates to 120 active connections, or 0.002 GLCUs (120 active connections per minute / 60,000 active connections per minute).
    • Bytes processed (GBs per hour): each GLCU provides 1GB. Since on average, each connection transfers 300 KB in bandwidth, this translates to 1.08 GB per hour (1 new connection per second * 300 KB per connection * 3600 seconds) or 1.08 GLCUs (1.08 GB per hour / 1 GB per hour).

    Using these values, the hourly bill is calculated by taking the maximum GLCUs consumed across the three dimensions and averaged over the hour. In this example, the Bytes processed dimension (1.08 GLCUs) is greater than both the New connections (0.00167 GLCUs) and Active connections (0.002 GLCUs) dimensions. Assuming this usage is consistent over 60 minutes, this results in a total charge of $0.00432 per hour (1.08 GLCUs * $0.004 per GLCU) or $3.11 per month ($0.00432 * 24 hours * 30 days).

    Adding the hourly charge of $0.0125, the total Gateway Load Balancer costs are:

    • $0.0168 per hour ($0.0125 hourly charge + $0.00432 GLCU charge); or
    • $12.10 per month ($0.0168 * 24 hours * 30 days).

    For one Gateway Load Balancer Endpoint, we calculate your monthly costs using the hourly charge of $0.01 and per GB data transfer charge of $0.0035. This results in a total charge of:

    • $0.0138 per hour ($0.01 hourly charge + $0.0035 per GB * 1.08 GB per hour); or
    • $9.94 per month ($0.0138 * 24 hours * 30 days).

    Altogether, the grand total Gateway Load Balancer and Gateway Load Balancer Endpoint costs are:

    • $0.0306 per hour ($0.0168 per hour for Gateway Load Balancer + $0.0138 per hour for Gateway Load Balancer Endpoint); or
    • $22.04 per month ($0.0306 * 24 hours * 30 days).

    Example 2

    Let’s assume your single-zone deployment Gateway Load Balancer and Gateway Load Balancer Endpoint each receives 100 new connections per second, each lasting 4 minutes and consuming 1 KB in processed bytes. We calculate your monthly costs using pricing in the US-East Region as follows:

    For one Gateway Load Balancer:

    • New connections or flows (per second): each GLCU provides up to 600 new connections per second. Since your Gateway Load Balancer receives 100 new connections per second, this translates to 0.167 GLCUs (100 new connections per second / 600 new connections per second).
    • Active connections or flows (per minute): each GLCU provides up to 60,000 active connections per minute. Your Gateway Load Balancer receives 100 new connections per second, each lasting 4 minutes. This translates to 24,000 active connections, or 0.4 GLCUs (24,000 active connections per minute / 60,000 active connections per minute).
    • Bytes processed (GBs per hour): each GLCU provides 1GB. Since on average, each connection transfers 1 KB in bandwidth, this translates to 0.36 GB (100 new connections per second * 1 KB per connection * 3600 seconds) per hour or 0.36 GLCUs (0.36 GB per hour / 1 GB per hour).

    Using these values, the hourly bill is calculated by taking the maximum GLCUs consumed across the three dimensions and averaged over the hour. In this example, the Active connections dimension (0.4 GLCUs) is greater than both the New connections (0.167 GLCUs) and Bytes processed (0.36 GLCUs) dimensions. Assuming this usage is consistent over 60 minutes, this results in a total charge of $0.0016 per hour (0.4 GLCUs * $0.004 per GLCU) or $1.15 per month ($0.0016 * 24 hours * 30 days).

    Adding the hourly charge of $0.0125, the total Gateway Load Balancer costs are:

    • $0.0141 per hour ($0.0125 hourly charge + $0.0016 GLCU charge); or
    • $10.15 per month ($0.0141 * 24 hours * 30 days).

    For one Gateway Load Balancer Endpoint, we calculate your monthly costs using the hourly charge of $0.01 and per GB data transfer charge of $0.0035. This results in a total charge of:

    • $0.0113 per hour ($0.01 hourly charge + $0.0035 per GB * 0.36 GB per hour); or
    • $8.14 per month ($0.0113 * 24 hours * 30 days).

    Altogether, the grand total Gateway Load Balancer and Gateway Load Balancer Endpoint costs are:

    • $0.0254 per hour ($0.0141 per hour for Gateway Load Balancer + $0.0113 per hour for Gateway Load Balancer Endpoint); or
    • $18.29 per month ($0.0254 * 24 hours * 30 days).

    Example 3: Multiple Availability Zones and Gateway Load Balancer Endpoints

    Let’s assume your Gateway Load Balancer is deployed in 2 Availability Zones and serves 4 Gateway Load Balancer Endpoints. Each Gateway Load Balancer Endpoint receives 25 new connections per second, each lasting 4 minutes and consuming 1 KB in processed bytes, resulting in the Gateway Load Balancer receiving 100 new connections per second. We calculate your monthly costs using pricing in the US-East Region as follows:

    For the Gateway Load Balancer:

    • New connections or flows (per second): each GLCU provides up to 600 new connections per second. Since your Gateway Load Balancer receives 100 new connections per second, this translates to 0.167 GLCUs (100 new connections per second / 600 new connections per second).
    • Active connections or flows (per minute): each GLCU provides up to 60,000 active connections per minute. Your Gateway Load Balancer receives 100 new connections per second, each lasting 4 minutes. This translates to 24,000 active connections, or 0.4 GLCUs (24,000 active connections per minute / 60,000 active connections per minute).
    • Bytes processed (GBs per hour): each GLCU provides 1GB. Since on average, each connection transfers 1 KB in bandwidth, this translates to 0.36 GB (100 new connections per second * 1 KB per connection * 3600 seconds) per hour or 0.36 GLCUs (0.36 GB per hour / 1 GB per hour).

    Using these values, the hourly bill is calculated by taking the maximum GLCUs consumed across the three dimensions and averaged over the hour. In this example, the Active connections dimension (0.4 GLCUs) is greater than both the New connections (0.167 GLCUs) and Bytes processed (0.36 GLCUs) dimensions. Assuming this usage is consistent over 60 minutes, this results in a total charge of $0.0016 per hour (0.4 GLCUs * $0.004 per GLCU) or $1.15 per month ($0.0016 * 24 hours * 30 days).

    Adding the hourly charge of $0.0125 per Availability Zone, the total Gateway Load Balancer costs are:

    • $0.0266 per hour ($0.0125 hourly charge per each Availability Zone * 2 Availability Zones deployed + $0.0016 GLCU charge); or
    • $19.15 per month ($0.0266 * 24 hours * 30 days).

    For your Gateway Load Balancer Endpoints, we calculate your monthly costs using the hourly charge of $0.01 per Gateway Load Balancer Endpoint and per GB data transfer charge of $0.0035. This results in a total charge of:

    • $0.0413 per hour ($0.01 hourly charge * 4 Gateway Load Balancer Endpoints + $0.0035 per GB * 0.36 GB per hour); or
    • $29.74 per month ($0.0113 * 24 hours * 30 days).

    Altogether, the grand total Gateway Load Balancer and Gateway Load Balancer Endpoint costs are:

    • $0.0679 per hour ($0.0266 per hour for Gateway Load Balancer + $0.0413 per hour for Gateway Load Balancer Endpoint); or
    • $48.89 per month ($0.0679 * 24 hours * 30 days).
  • Classic Load Balancer
  • Except as otherwise noted, our prices are exclusive of applicable taxes and duties, including VAT and applicable sales tax. For customers with a Japanese billing address, use of AWS is subject to Japanese Consumption Tax. Learn more.

    Amazon EC2 service fees apply and are billed separately.

    Pricing Example

    Example 1

    A medium-sized website running on 10 Amazon EC2 instances in the US East (N. Virginia) Region could use one load balancer to balance incoming traffic. If the load balancer ended up transferring 100 GB of data over a 30 day period, the monthly charge would amount to $18 (or $0.025 per hour x 24 hours per day x 30 days x 1 load balancer) for the load balancer hours and $0.80 (or $0.008 per GB x 100 GB) for the data transferred through the load balancer, for a total monthly charge of $18.80. Partial hours are billed as full hours. Amazon EC2 service fees apply and are billed separately.

Pricing Calculator

Additional pricing resources

AWS Pricing Calculator

Easily calculate your monthly costs with AWS

Economics Resource Center

Additional resources for switching to AWS

Product-Page_Standard-Icons_01_Product-Features_SqInk
Learn how to get started

Explore the getting started guide and video resources

Learn more 
Product-Page_Standard-Icons_02_Sign-Up_SqInk
Sign up for a free account

Instantly get access to the AWS Free Tier. 

Sign up 
Product-Page_Standard-Icons_03_Start-Building_SqInk
Start building in the console

Get started with Elastic Load Balancing in the AWS Console.

Sign in