AWS Partner Network (APN) Blog

Tag: Amazon Resource Name

Transit Gateway

Aruba SD-Branch Optimizes Intelligent Edge Connectivity to AWS

Whether you need to deploy application workloads across the globe in a single click, or build and deploy specific applications closer to end users with single-digit millisecond latency, AWS provides you the cloud infrastructure where and when you need it. Learn how an Aruba SD-Branch solution enhances access to cloud-hosted applications by making it easy to initialize and optimize the connectivity to AWS, while also providing orchestration and complete lifecycle management of WAN gateways.

Radware-AWS-Partners

How Radware CNP Uses Amazon Route 53 Query Logging for Threat Detection

AWS recently launched a new feature as part of its Amazon Route 53 service, called Route 53 Resolver Query Logging. This new service enables organizations to retrieve logs of their Domain Name System (DNS) queries originating from resources within their VPCs. Learn how these logs can be analyzed as part of the Radware Cloud Native Protector Service (CNP), which provides a range of fully managed, enterprise-grade cloud security solutions to protect applications running in public clouds.

AWS-Config-Rules-1

Integrating Third-Party Solutions to AWS Config Rule Evaluations

AWS Config continuously monitors and records your AWS resource configurations, and allows you to automate the evaluation of recorded configurations against desired configurations. This post aims to assist you on deploying a set of custom AWS Config Rules that leverages third-party REST APIs to evaluate AWS resources in an automated fashion. The AWS Config evaluations represented in this guide show the reporting status of Amazon EC2 instances against TrendMicro and Qualys.

Monitoring Your Palo Alto Networks VM-Series Firewall with a Syslog Sidecar

By hosting a Palo Alto Networks VM-Series firewall in an Amazon VPC, you can use AWS native cloud services—such as Amazon CloudWatch, Amazon Kinesis Data Streams, and AWS Lambda—to monitor your firewall for changes in configuration. This post explains why that’s desirable and walks you through the steps required to do it. You now have a way to monitor your Palo Alto Networks firewall that is very similar to how you monitor your AWS environment with AWS Config.