AWS News Blog

Amazon Prime Day 2022 – AWS for the Win!

As part of my annual tradition to tell you about how AWS makes Prime Day possible, I am happy to be able to share some chart-topping metrics (check out my 2016, 2017, 2019, 2020, and 2021 posts for a look back).

My purchases this year included a first aid kit, some wood brown filament for my 3D printer, and a non-stick frying pan! According to our official news release, Prime members worldwide purchased more than 100,000 items per minute during Prime Day, with best-selling categories including Amazon Devices, Consumer Electronics, and Home.

Powered by AWS
As always, AWS played a critical role in making Prime Day a success. A multitude of two-pizza teams worked together to make sure that every part of our infrastructure was scaled, tested, and ready to serve our customers. Here are a few examples:

Amazon Aurora – On Prime Day, 5,326 database instances running the PostgreSQL-compatible and MySQL-compatible editions of Amazon Aurora processed 288 billion transactions, stored 1,849 terabytes of data, and transferred 749 terabytes of data.

Amazon EC2 – For Prime Day 2022, Amazon increased the total number of normalized instances (an internal measure of compute power) on Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (Amazon EC2) by 12%. This resulted in an overall server equivalent footprint that was only 7% larger than that of Cyber Monday 2021 due to the increased adoption of AWS Graviton2 processors.

Amazon EBS – For Prime Day, the Amazon team added 152 petabytes of EBS storage. The resulting fleet handled 11.4 trillion requests per day and transferred 532 petabytes of data per day. Interestingly enough, due to increased efficiency of some of the internal Amazon services used to run Prime Day, Amazon actually used about 4% less EBS storage and transferred 13% less data than it did during Prime Day last year. Here’s a graph that shows the increase in data transfer during Prime Day:

Amazon SES – In order to keep Prime Day shoppers aware of the deals and to deliver order confirmations, Amazon Simple Email Service (SES) peaked at 33,000 Prime Day email messages per second.

Amazon SQS – During Prime Day, Amazon Simple Queue Service (SQS) set a new traffic record by processing 70.5 million messages per second at peak:

Amazon DynamoDB – DynamoDB powers multiple high-traffic Amazon properties and systems including Alexa, the Amazon.com sites, and all Amazon fulfillment centers. Over the course of Prime Day, these sources made trillions of calls to the DynamoDB API. DynamoDB maintained high availability while delivering single-digit millisecond responses and peaking at 105.2 million requests per second.

Amazon SageMaker – The Amazon Robotics Pick Time Estimator, which uses Amazon SageMaker to train a machine learning model to predict the amount of time future pick operations will take, processed more than 100 million transactions during Prime Day 2022.

Amazon QuickSight – Hundreds of thousands of Amazonians across the company (including over 1,000 users from Amazon Prime Day teams, spanning 24 countries) used Amazon QuickSight to monitor and visualize Prime Day metrics in dashboards and ask questions in Amazon QuickSight Q. Over the course of Prime Day, QuickSight served millions of business intelligence queries, with a peak of 500 queries per minute per data set.

Package Planning – In North America, and on the highest traffic Prime 2022 day, package-planning systems performed 60 million AWS Lambda invocations, processed 17 terabytes of compressed data in Amazon Simple Storage Service (Amazon S3), stored 64 million items across Amazon DynamoDB and Amazon ElastiCache, served 200 million events over Amazon Kinesis, and handled 50 million Amazon Simple Queue Service events.

Prepare to Scale
Every year I reiterate the same message: rigorous preparation is key to the success of Prime Day and our other large-scale events. If you are preparing for a similar chart-topping event of your own, I strongly recommend that you take advantage of AWS Infrastructure Event Management (IEM). As part of an IEM engagement, my colleagues will provide you with architectural and operational guidance that will help you to execute your event with confidence!

Jeff;

Jeff Barr

Jeff Barr

Jeff Barr is Chief Evangelist for AWS. He started this blog in 2004 and has been writing posts just about non-stop ever since.