AWS Compute Blog

Using Amazon EFS for AWS Lambda in your serverless applications

Serverless applications are event-driven, using ephemeral compute functions to integrate services and transform data. While AWS Lambda includes a 512-MB temporary file system for your code, this is an ephemeral scratch resource not intended for durable storage.

Amazon EFS is a fully managed, elastic, shared file system designed to be consumed by other AWS services, such as Lambda. With the release of Amazon EFS for Lambda, you can now easily share data across function invocations. You can also read large reference data files, and write function output to a persistent and shared store. There is no additional charge for using file systems from your Lambda function within the same VPC.

EFS for Lambda makes it simpler to use a serverless architecture to implement many common workloads. It opens new capabilities, such as building and importing large code libraries directly into your Lambda functions. Since the code is loaded dynamically, you can also ensure that the latest version of these libraries is always used by every new execution environment. For appending to existing files, EFS is also a preferred option to using Amazon S3.

This blog post shows how to enable EFS for Lambda in your AWS account, and walks through some common use-cases.

Capabilities and behaviors of Lambda with EFS

EFS is built to scale on demand to petabytes of data, growing and shrinking automatically as files are written and deleted. When used with Lambda, your code has low-latency access to a file system where data is persisted after the function terminates.

EFS is a highly reliable NFS-based regional service, with all data stored durably across multiple Availability Zones. It is cost-optimized, due to no provisioning requirements, and no purchase commitments. It uses built-in lifecycle management to optimize between SSD-performance class and an infrequent access class that offer 92% lower cost.

EFS offers two performance modes – general purpose and MaxIO. General purpose is suitable for most Lambda workloads, providing lower operational latency and higher performance for individual files.

You also choose between two throughput modes – bursting and provisioned. The bursting mode uses a credit system to determine when a file system can burst. With bursting, your throughput is calculated based upon the amount of data you are storing. Provisioned throughput is useful when you need more throughout than provided by the bursting mode. Total throughput available is divided across the number of concurrent Lambda invocations.

The Lambda service mounts EFS file systems when the execution environment is prepared. This adds minimal latency when the function is invoked for the first time, often within hundreds of milliseconds. When the execution environment is already warm from previous invocations, the EFS mount is already available.

EFS can be used with Provisioned Concurrency for Lambda. When the reserved capacity is prepared, the Lambda service also configures and mounts EFS file system. Since Provisioned Concurrency executes any initialization code, any libraries or packages consumed from EFS at this point are downloaded. In this use-case, it’s recommended to use provisioned throughout when configuring EFS.

The EFS file system is shared across Lambda functions as it scales up the number of concurrent executions. As files are written by one instance of a Lambda function, all other instances can access and modify this data, depending upon the access point permissions. The EFS file system scales with your Lambda functions, supporting up to 25,000 concurrent connections.

Creating an EFS file system

Configuring EFS for Lambda is straight-forward. I show how to do this in the AWS Management Console but you can also use the AWS CLI, AWS SDK, AWS Serverless Application Model (AWS SAM), and AWS CloudFormation. EFS file systems are always created within a customer VPC, so Lambda functions using the EFS file system must all reside in the same VPC.

To create an EFS file system:

  1. Navigate to the EFS console.
  2. Choose Create File System.
    EFS: Create File System
  3. On the Configure network access page, select your preferred VPC. Only resources within this VPC can access this EFS file system. Accept the default mount targets, and choose Next Step.
  4. On Configure file system settings, you can choose to enable encryption of data at rest. Review this setting, then accept the other defaults and choose Next Step. This uses bursting mode instead of provisioned throughout.
  5. On the Configure client access page, choose Add access point.
    EFS: Add access point
  6. Enter the following parameters. This configuration creates a file system with open read/write permissions – read more about settings to secure your access points. Choose Next Step.Access points in EFS
  7. On the Review and create page, check your settings and choose Create File System.
  8. In the EFS console, you see the new file system and its configuration. Wait until the Mount target state changes to Available before proceeding to the next steps.

Alternatively, you can use CloudFormation to create the EFS access point. With the AWS::EFS::AccessPoint resource, the preceding configuration is defined as follows:

  AccessPointResource:
    Type: 'AWS::EFS::AccessPoint'
    Properties:
      FileSystemId: !Ref FileSystemResource
      PosixUser:
        Uid: "1000"
        Gid: "1000"
      RootDirectory:
        CreationInfo:
          OwnerGid: "1000"
          OwnerUid: "1000"
          Permissions: "0777"
        Path: "/efs"

For more information, see the example setup template in the code repository.

Working with AWS Cloud9 and Amazon EC2

You can mount EFS access points on Amazon EC2 instances. This can be useful for browsing file systems contents and downloading files from other locations. The EFS console shows customized mount instructions directly under each created file system:

EFS customized mount instructions

The instance must have access to the same security group and reside in the same VPC as the EFS file system. After connecting via SSH to the EC2 instance, you mount the EFS mount target to a directory. You can also mount EFS in AWS Cloud9 instances using the terminal window.

Any files you write into the EFS file system are available to any Lambda functions using the same EFS file system. Similarly, any files written by Lambda functions are available to the EC2 instance.

Sharing large code packages with Lambda

EFS is useful for sharing software packages or binaries that are otherwise too large for Lambda layers. You can copy these to EFS and have Lambda use these packages as if there are installed in the Lambda deployment package.

For example, on EFS you can install Puppeteer, which runs a headless Chromium browser, using the following script run on an EC2 instance or AWS Cloud9 terminal:

  mkdir node && cd node
  npm init -y
  npm i puppeteer --save

Building packages in EC2 for EFS

You can then use this package from a Lambda function connected to this folder in the EFS file system. You include the Puppeteer package with the mount path in the require declaration:

const puppeteer = require ('/mnt/efs/node/node_modules/puppeteer')

In Node.js, to avoid changing declarations manually, you can add the EFS mount path to the Node.js module search path by using app-module-path. Lambda functions support a range of other runtimes, including Python, Java, and Go. Many other runtimes offer similar ways to add the EFS path to the list of default package locations.

There is an important difference between using packages in EFS compared with Lambda layers. When you use Lambda layers to include packages, these are downloaded to an immutable code package. Any changes to the underlying layer do not affect existing functions published using that layer.

Since EFS is a dynamic binding, any changes or upgrades to packages are available immediately to the Lambda function when the execution environment is prepared. This means you can output a build process to an EFS mount, and immediately consume any new versions of the build from a Lambda function.

Configuring AWS Lambda to use EFS

Lambda functions that access EFS must run from within a VPC. Read this guide to learn more about setting up Lambda functions to access resources from a VPC. There are also sample CloudFormation templates you can use to configure private and public VPC access.

The execution role for Lambda function must provide access to the VPC and EFS. For development and testing purposes, this post uses the AWSLambdaVPCAccessExecutionRole and AmazonElasticFileSystemClientFullAccess managed policies in IAM. For production systems, you should use more restrictive policies to control access to EFS resources.

Once your Lambda function is configured to use a VPC, next configure EFS in Lambda:

  1. Navigate to the Lambda console and select your function from the list.
  2. Scroll down to the File system panel, and choose Add file system.
    EFS: Add file system
  3. In the File system configuration:
  • From the EFS file system dropdown, select the required file system. From the Access point dropdown, choose the required EFS access point.
  • In the Local mount path, enter the path your Lambda function uses to access this resource. Enter an absolute path.
  • Choose Save.
    EFS: Add file system

The File system panel now shows the configuration of the EFS mount, and the function is ready to use EFS. Alternatively, you can use an AWS Serverless Application Model (SAM) template to add the EFS configuration to a function resource:

AWSTemplateFormatVersion: '2010-09-09'
Resources:
  MyLambdaFunction:
    Type: AWS::Serverless::Function
    Properties:
	...
      FileSystemConfigs:
      - Arn: arn:aws:elasticfilesystem:us-east-1:xxxxxx:access-point/
fsap-123abcdef12abcdef
        LocalMountPath: /mnt/efs

To learn more, see the SAM documentation on this feature.

Example applications

You can view and download these examples from this GitHub repository. To deploy, follow the instructions in the repo’s README.md file.

1. Processing large video files

The first example uses EFS to process a 60-minute MP4 video and create screenshots for each second of the recording. This uses to the FFmpeg Linux package to process the video. After copying the MP4 to the EFS file location, invoke the Lambda function to create a series of JPG frames. This uses the following code to execute FFmpeg and pass the EFS mount path and input file parameters:

const os = require('os')

const inputFile = process.env.INPUT_FILE
const efsPath = process.env.EFS_PATH

const { exec } = require('child_process')

const execPromise = async (command) => {
	console.log(command)
	return new Promise((resolve, reject) => {
		const ls = exec(command, function (error, stdout, stderr) {
		  if (error) {
		    console.log('Error: ', error)
		    reject(error)
		  }
		  console.log('stdout: ', stdout);
		  console.log('stderr: ' ,stderr);
		})
		
		ls.on('exit', function (code) {
		  console.log('Finished: ', code);
		  resolve()
		})
	})
}

// The Lambda handler
exports.handler = async function (eventObject, context) {
	await execPromise(`/opt/bin/ffmpeg -loglevel error -i ${efsPath}/${inputFile} -s 240x135 -vf fps=1 ${efsPath}/%d.jpg`)
}

In this example, the process writes more than 2000 individual JPG files back to the EFS file system during a single invocation:

Console output from sample application

2. Archiving large numbers of files

Using the output from the first application, the second example creates a single archive file from the JPG files. The code uses the Node.js archiver package for processing:

const outputFile = process.env.OUTPUT_FILE
const efsPath = process.env.EFS_PATH

const fs = require('fs')
const archiver = require('archiver')

// The Lambda handler
exports.handler = function (event) {

  const output = fs.createWriteStream(`${efsPath}/${outputFile}`)
  const archive = archiver('zip', {
    zlib: { level: 9 } // Sets the compression level.
  })
  
  output.on('close', function() {
    console.log(archive.pointer() + ' total bytes')
  })
  
  output.on('end', function() {
    console.log('Data has been drained')
  })
  
  archive.pipe(output)  

  // append files from a glob pattern
  archive.glob(`${efsPath}/*.jpg`)
  archive.finalize()
}

After executing this Lambda function, the resulting ZIP file is written back to the EFS file system:

Console output from second sample application.

3. Unzipping archives with a large number of files

The last example shows how to unzip an archive containing many files. This uses the Node.js unzipper package for processing:

const inputFile = process.env.INPUT_FILE
const efsPath = process.env.EFS_PATH
const destinationDir = process.env.DESTINATION_DIR

const fs = require('fs')
const unzipper = require('unzipper')

// The Lambda handler
exports.handler = function (event) {

  fs.createReadStream(`${efsPath}/${inputFile}`)
    .pipe(unzipper.Extract({ path: `${efsPath}/${destinationDir}` }))

}

Once this Lambda function is executed, the archive is unzipped into a destination direction in the EFS file system. This example shows the screenshots unzipped into the frames subdirectory:

Console output from third sample application.

Conclusion

EFS for Lambda allows you to share data across function invocations, read large reference data files, and write function output to a persistent and shared store. After configuring EFS, you provide the Lambda function with an access point ARN, allowing you to read and write to this file system. Lambda securely connects the function instances to the EFS mount targets in the same Availability Zone and subnet.

EFS opens a range of potential new use-cases for Lambda. In this post, I show how this enables you to access large code packages and binaries, and process large numbers of files. You can interact with the file system via EC2 or AWS Cloud9 and pass information to and from your Lambda functions.

EFS for Lambda is supported at launch in APN Partner solutions, including Epsagon, Lumigo, Datadog, HashiCorp Terraform, and Pulumi. To learn more about how to use EFS for Lambda, see the AWS News Blog post and read the documentation.