Gadjian means payday in Indonesian, and it’s the name of Fitriati and Fernanda’s newest business venture, officially launched in 2016, which offers cloud-based payroll and human resources solutions to small and medium-sized Indonesian businesses. The company provides its services via two integrated apps, which cover payroll management, personnel data storage, leave administration (including overtime, vacation, and sick days), shift scheduling, and employee loan management. It’s a multifaceted approach that makes perfect sense for a pair of entrepreneurs who have repeatedly demonstrated their adeptness at meeting the demands of a quickly changing marketplace over the past decade.

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As Singapore's reputation as a startup destination has developed, so has Wego's presence in the ranks of online travel platforms. Their expansion has been made possible, says Nguyen, through a company-wide preoccupation with automation. "We focus a lot of effort on automation, so we try to bring automation into our culture," he explains.

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When he was at university, Joshua Newman had plenty of time to play sports and plenty of people to play them with. But as he’d gotten older, schedules became tighter, and it was harder to discover strangers of the same skill level with whom he could organize a weekly game or match. He decided to do something about that.

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When people think of cybersecurity, they too often think of a single app or program that can be downloaded to protect against, say, malware. Singapore-based cybersecurity startup Horangi is out to change all that.

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Hari Sivan, the co-founder and CEO of SoCash, says that the inspiration for the startup came from his wife, Rekha Hari (who is also a co-founder). The couple’s apartment in Simei, Singapore was a kilometer away from the nearest ATM, and going to get cash from that ATM had always been one of their least favorite weekend errands.

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By now, increasingly large datasets parsed by increasingly sophisticated dashboards are the norm at most software companies. But the question of what all the information means is still unresolved.

“Most people in businesses don't like dashboards and they don't like spreadsheets. What they prefer is information on a plate, spelled out with insights, with a narrative, with a purpose,” says Dave Sanderson, CEO and founder of Nugit, a Singapore-based startup that is devoted to solving this very problem. This kind of digestion and presentation of data is the work of teams of analysts, illustrators, and business people who work together to craft stories that are legible for others in the business—and customers too.

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Wavecell was founded in 2010 as a self-funded venture that aimed to simplify real-time cloud communications. Today, the company, headquartered in Singapore, employs a team of 80, working on the ground in five countries across Southeast Asia. Olivier Gerhardt, Wavecell’s CEO and co-founder, who dreamed up the business after 15 years in the telecommunications industry, says their rapid growth has been a pleasant surprise. “We’ve got a really good team, good talents, who work very well,” he says. It’s that human capital that he credits for Wavecell’s ability to scale so quickly.

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Nobody wakes up in the morning excited to take out a loan or buy insurance. And yet those are the necessary tools to achieving life goals that do drive people—starting a family and buying a house, traveling the world, retiring comfortably. The financial industry is happy to take advantage of this asymmetry. It provides tools that help people achieve what they really want to do. But because the tools aren’t as widely understood as the goals they further, financial institutions are able to impose terms favorable to themselves on regular people who just want to be able to afford a stable life.

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In mid-2015, India’s major telecommunications provider released a new, affordable plan allowing 4G and almost unlimited data. In a country where streaming was not widespread, a huge population could suddenly view streaming content on any device.

This posed an incredible opportunity for Spuul, the first video platform that targets an Indian audience, focusing on South Indian, Bollywood, and other popular genres from the Indian diaspora. “In the past, the common thought was, ‘Streaming is too expensive. Should I use my precious data to watch a video, or should I use Facebook instead?’” says Daniel Muller, Spuul’s Head of Cloud Infrastructure.

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When asked to explain what his company does, Rishi Israni phrases Zimplistic's achievement in terms of millennia.

"Do you know, for the first time ever, we've solved a thousand-year-old problem of making flatbread?"

Flatbread, Rishi explains, is eaten by over 2 billion people per day. And until the Rotimatic, the brainchild of Zimplistic, came along, all flatbreads were made by hand. This wasn't because of a lack of trying—people have been trying to mechanize the creation of flatbread as long as factory bakeries have been around.

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When you ask Neil Davidson, CEO and co-founder of Coda Payments, how his brainchild came into being, he starts talking geographically.

"We saw something interesting in Southeast Asia," he says. That "something interesting" was the fact that, among the 600 million people living in the region, very few of them had a credit or debit card. Cash was king and banking penetration was low. Which meant that, when it came to telecommunications, people were buying prepaid SIM cards that contained the value necessary to buy data bundles or make phone calls.

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Four years ago, George Kesselman was the youngest COO of a major US-based insurance company. His career was progressing, but something didn’t feel right. Stifled by the constraints of the traditional insurance system, Kesselman found it almost impossible to innovate. “I felt like a train engineer, where you can only go a little bit faster or a little bit slower," he says. “The rails are largely set for you, and it’s hard to make significant changes.”

The major issue holding insurance companies back, according to Kesselman, was that the sales teams controlled the product distribution and “everything, from the product itself to technology and customer service, was optimized for making in-person sales of complex products.”

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