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PostgreSQL 9.5

Jetware | 170503-postgresql_9_5_6

Linux/Unix, Amazon Linux 2017.03.0 - 64-bit Amazon Machine Image (AMI)

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External reviews

454 reviews
from G2

External reviews are not included in the AWS star rating for the product.


    Timothy S.

Postgresql - The Only RDBMS You Need

  • July 17, 2015
  • Review verified by G2

What do you like best?
Everything. It supports all the SQL-92 standards, plus some of their own editions. It has a very mature GIS querying and every type of index. It supports in memory and a ton of different trigger languages. There's no feature or item missing from postgresql.

Use it and you will be happy.

It's an exact replacement for oracle without the cost. Supports triggers, procs, functions and everything you can think of including a datascience machine learning package MADLIB.

There's no reasons not to use Postgresql. The drivers for Java and Scala and NodeJS are excellent. Postgresql also powers a lot of servers like Cloudfoundry.
What do you dislike?
The problem with Postgresql is that there's a lot of version and no single owner of the enterprise verison. No really a concern.
What problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?
We are using it for data warehousing, basic data for web sites, blog storage, backup data and research data. It is also our main analytic database and transactional store.

It has saved us a lot of development time and money. Spring Data JPA and hibernate work perfect with PGSQL. pgADMIN and all JDBC SQL tools work perfect with it.
Recommendations to others considering the product:
There is no reason to not use PostgreSQL, it is amazingly mature coming from Ingres and Dr Stonebreaker. It's been around forever and is really solid. A dozen or so commercial vendors have MPP and datawarehouse forks of it that they use.

Postgresql JSON features are very helpful for front-end usage and the indexes make most queries blazing fast.

We have no dba and really don't need one. The DB runs itself.

You do need to run a few dba tasks weekly like vacuum, analyze and backup.

Check your explain plans and make sure you have adequate queries.


    Gennady G.

PostgreSQL Review by a MySQL DBA

  • April 30, 2015
  • Review verified by G2

What do you like best?
During my 3-4 years of being exposed to PostgreSQL in a professional environment, everything being transactional was quite good, partial indexes are awesome and helped me optimize things quite a bit for the application at Vonage that was running on EnterpriseDB at the time (2006-2007). At the time, the feature set was a bit better than MySQL, which was my primary expertise. We were trying to substitute Oracle with PostgreSQL for a specific task we had. There was also a rather large at the time deployment of snort logging into postgres (500 gigs or so before it started falling over)

I liked the way backups and restores were described for getting a snapshot in time, as in "backup the data even if it's changin, then backup the log files, with some function calls here and there"
What do you dislike?
Replication, at least in 2006-2007 was slony and log-shipping. Slony would fail to create new replicas after about 100 gigs on somewhat serious enterprise hardware due to it recreating the database via a pg_dump method which obviously stops working after certain level of data size is reached. Was a pretty bad time, 1/5 stars, would not repeat.

Some of the commands were just dowright tedious.

processlist ? some obscure table, or function call.

kill a process ? yet another obscure function call

see all the tables and sequences ? \d, naturally

just the table ? \dt, everybody knows that

show create table, doesn't exist - have to break into pg_dump
show create function/trigger/view/event/etc - nope, pg_dump for you

Not sure if this is the same way still, but replication is the major win for MySQL currently, it's easy to have replicas, all the information and monitoring is easy to retrieve.
What problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?
At Shutterstock, we've got 1 instance of pure PostgreSQL that keeps track of our infrastructure. about 4000 nodes with facter facts from puppet being shoved into an hstore, which was the original reason for going that way, mainly due to the developer picking that as the store. This mainly gets in the way of sharing data. Aside from that we have a few instances of vertica, which is based on postgres, and the interface tends to get in the way at times.

At Vonage, I ran 2-3 EnterpriseDB clusters from 100 gigs to 500 gigs in size. 5 node slony-replicated cluster ran the customer support software, partial indexes there were used to optimize specific query paths to help the software that was never meant to be used at that scale run smoothly. Eventually, replication stopped being able to spin up a new node via its own methods. Was a pretty bad time, I think we ended up copying the data and modifying some internal data structure to fool it into thinking it was fine, when it wasn't fine.
Recommendations to others considering the product:
Make sure you properly benchmark it for your given task at hand and look at further scale-out options. Data is only going to get bigger, and scaling the webapp is easier than scaling a monolithic database servers.


    Internal Consultant in Entertainment

PostgreSQL is reliable, feature-rich, and allows us to process thousands of transactions per second.

  • April 29, 2015
  • Review provided by G2

What do you like best?
PostgreSQL is durable and fault-tolerant by design; great effort is taken by the developers to ensure reliability is maintained.

This cautious approach does not hinder development though; constant enhancements are delivered in every release, with new features generally arriving ahead of much more expensive commercial products.

With both community and commercial support, bug fixes and security issues (although rare) are always addressed quickly, and generally resolved far quicker than most commercial vendors.

With a wide selection of both free and commercial tools to accompany it, we are easily as productive if not more than we would be with a commercial offering.

Overall PostgreSQL has excellent speed, reliability and support of SQL standards; coupled with its "free forever" licensing, there is no risk of costly vendor lock-in.
What do you dislike?
There's very little to dislike about PostgreSQL, and the "free forever" BSD style licensing means you've nothing to lose in trying it for prototyping you next project. I've no idea why anyone would use anything else.
What problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?
Improved performance and reliability of our underlying business critical DBMS means we are constantly able to deliver where other businesses cannot.

Ease of development.

Low Total Cost of Ownership
Recommendations to others considering the product:
Do it now.


    Joseph T.

Open-source DB for all your needs and security

  • April 28, 2015
  • Review provided by G2

What do you like best?
* Very popular amongst Ruby on Rails developers and as a greenhorn in the field of web development, it's popularity speaks volumes to the number of blog posts and tutorial guides. That alone is a winner in my book.
* Implements the SQL standard very well
* Includes support for "advanced" SQL stuff like window functions or common table expressions
* Supports lots of advanced data types, such as (multi-dimensional) arrays, user-defined types, and more
* Open-Source!
What do you dislike?
* Documentation is confusion, many of PosgreSQL versions have overlapping variety but they do include a thorough description of the issue.
* Replication is not yet as well implemented as in MySQL
* Not as competitive in the OS support as MySQL, but this is trivial if you use a a rare OS or require widespread support: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comparison_of_relational_database_management_systems
What problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?
* Easy deployment to Heroku requires PostgreSQL since I'm a Rails developer, here's why: https://devcenter.heroku.com/articles/sqlite3

"SQLite runs in memory, and backs up its data store in files on disk. While this strategy works well for development, Heroku’s Cedar stack has an ephemeral filesystem. You can write to it, and you can read from it, but the contents will be cleared periodically. If you were to use SQLite on Heroku, you would lose your entire database at least once every 24 hours."

* I've been able to learn more standard SQL techniques and solutions to the problems so I've been able to comprehend any relational database since PostgreSQL is so prevalent


    Bruce R.

PostgreSQL is a great database system

  • April 28, 2015
  • Review verified by G2

What do you like best?
The combination of PostgreSQL and PostGIS. It has been the foundation of our glacier mapping system for years, and has always been rock-solid and packed with features we need.
What do you dislike?
I can think of no dislikes that would not apply to any other relational database system as well.
What problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?
Web-accessible database of Earth's glaciers. Combined with MapServer, we provide interactive maps and Open Geospatial Consortium web services. The stack is reliable, configurable, and flexible. Performance on a VM is more than sufficient. The database contains data and metadata for close to 200,000 glaciers, including polygons that are the outlines of the glaciers.


    Consumer Services

My Postgre experience

  • April 24, 2015
  • Review verified by G2

What do you like best?
There are window functions. It makes a lot of things to be solved much easier than without them. Hive databases also have similar functions so it's relatively easy to move to Hive from PostgreSQL. Also has a function already available to create a custom functions.
What do you dislike?
Not the best performance on reading operations compared to MySQL database.
What problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?
We used id while creating an online web store. It wasn't the best solution to choose but it covered our needs.
Recommendations to others considering the product:
Want your data to be safely stored? - Use PostgreSQL.
Also if you use pretty complex database designs, PostgreSQL is nice solution for that.


    Prashant W.

Best open source relational database in my opinion

  • April 21, 2015
  • Review verified by G2

What do you like best?
In mysql if your table does not have a primary key , the import button is not visible. In contrast to this postgresql allows you to make use of import data from a csv into a table even if the table does not contain primary key.
What do you dislike?
the POSTGRESQL does not provide an interaction graphic user interface such as mysql in order to alter the table elements. In case of MYSQL if we can easily change a data type of any column of table using mysql workbench. However postgreSQL does not provide such interactive way to change the column datatype. Also in case if you want to alter a column type such as double to character then we have to explicitly write alter command to make the change
What problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?
Building a relational model for the pricing department at university of utah hospital to analyse the charge description master document efficiently and set appropriate procedure prices
Recommendations to others considering the product:
In case you are looking to design a large and efficient database model, you should definitely check into postgresql.
It is extremely easy to setup and installs in few minutes. Another feature which i absolutley love about postgresql is the graphical query builder. In case you want to write join statements across multiple tables all you need to do is simply drag lines between the columns which you want to impose the join condition.


    Rohit V.

Stable for large scale relation data

  • April 16, 2015
  • Review provided by G2

What do you like best?
It is very fast for large amount of data. The front end client (pgAdmin III) is bundles with the database and is very responsive for a large number of concurrent connections.
What do you dislike?
A steep learning curve for proprietary configuration.
What problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?
Developing a distributed application with multiple servers connecting to the PostgreSQL.
Recommendations to others considering the product:
Good for new users.


    Pengcheng X.

A classical RDBMS to learn RDBMS internals

  • April 09, 2015
  • Review verified by G2

What do you like best?
I like standards-compliance of PostgreSQL best. As we know, PostgreSQL follows the majority of the SQL2011 standard, is ACID-compliant and transactional using multiversion concurrency control (MVCC); has updateable views and materialized views, triggers, foreign keys; supports functions and stored procedures, and other expandability, and has a large number of extensions written by third parties. It is easy to not only learn how things works but also easy to modify it according to your requirement. I often wrote queries and tested them on it when I was still a student to learn RDBMS. After I worked, I also referred to it when I am not sure about the standard. Moreover, it has lots of add-on choices (for example, remote access module) for you to add and use.
What do you dislike?
The things that I dislike most is its security setting. It is hard and difficult for beginners to write the conf file to make it work. I hope it could have an option of no-"security" so that we can skip it and focus on the major things.
What problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?
We are developing an open source distributed DBMS. Postgres helps us understand the standard, e.g., SQL2011
Recommendations to others considering the product:
Standard compliance


    Regina O.

Database development and application development with PostgreSQL

  • April 03, 2015
  • Review provided by G2

What do you like best?
Lots of ANSI SQL features, array support, extended type support, great query planner works well with custom types. Free without strings. Runs on windows, mac, and Linux.
What do you dislike?
Needs parallelization for queries like SQL Server and Oracle have. Need ability to replicate single databases easily.
What problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?
We use it as a back end for most of our applications. We've been able to use advanced SQL constructs that we didn't have available in SQL Server, allowing us to be able to move most logic into the database where it can be used across many applications.
Recommendations to others considering the product:
PostgreSQL is a great database. It has both fantastic relational support and other type extensions for NoSQL like workflows so you get the best of both worlds. It supports many stored procedure languages in db JavaScript, SQL, Perl, Python, and R.