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Redis 2.8 on Ubuntu

Websoft9 | Redis 2.8.24 - Ubuntu 20.04

Linux/Unix, Ubuntu 20.04 - 64-bit Amazon Machine Image (AMI)

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External reviews

106 reviews
from G2

External reviews are not included in the AWS star rating for the product.


    Internet

Amazed by the response time and works great for applications that need high read and write access.

  • July 23, 2015
  • Review provided by G2

What do you like best?
As mentioned in the title, Redis is fast and accurate. This makes certain tasks easier since most of the times, we don't have to rely on data stored on disk.
What do you dislike?
To be honest, I didn't use Redis for considerable amount of time to nit pick anything. All in all, I liked it as it was.
What problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?
So we wanted to store the customer profile information and we didn't wanted to use relational databases since it becomes too complicated to use. In essence to Redis, it is very easy to change the structure and I don't have to write big queries to fetch customer related information.
Recommendations to others considering the product:
Improvements on documentation would certainly help.


    Computer Software

Redis: the backbone of multi-process communication

  • July 21, 2015
  • Review provided by G2

What do you like best?
Whether you need a producer-consumer implementation that scales to thousands of machines or an application monitoring and servicing protocol, Redis is one of the best tools out there.
What do you dislike?
It took the community a long time to deliver Redis Cluster and, as of this writing, it is a brand new implementation that has yet to be battle hardened.
What problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?
Redis is great for solving the business problem of enabling web-scale and easy maintainability while using the most popular web-development languages and platforms. The former is required to deliver value to customers while the latter is required to attract top talent.


    Brad K.

Redis for realtime xml flight data management

  • July 20, 2015
  • Review provided by G2

What do you like best?
Fast, easy to set up. Did I say fast ? Redis met all of our expectations for managing constant stream of flight data in XML, with very frequent object updates. Using Java, the Jedis library was easy to use and intuitive once I had my head around the Redis command language. Redis has great client support across multiple languages as well. The expiration feature is also crucial for our application. Most other databases you would need to create a background task to look for items that need to be garbage collected. With Redis you can set an expiration and it will remove it for you, unless you touch the item again and reset the expiration.
What do you dislike?
No way to really build a "table" (list of hashes) without Lua scripting. This is a capability where you really have to build your own lists, then have those list elements point to a separate hash object to achieve this.
What problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?
Realtime flight data storage in XML. Use of sets for access control lists.


    Internet

middle level of using experience with Redis in application backend

  • July 18, 2015
  • Review provided by G2

What do you like best?
1, great performance metric in the perspective of both capacity and latency
2, reliable in production environment
3, simplicity of utilization with good documentation, community, ecosystem and comprehensive data structure
What do you dislike?
getting bigger and bigger, like clustering in the new version, i personally believe simplification is almost always the key of successful.

redis is probably the best in cache. It looks like redis wants to really scale out with cluster, integration or following the way of Cassandra with tunable ability between C and A, leave this choice to the application/users.
What problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?
Documentation indexing and serving.
In multiple region case. it is getting to expensive to use.
Recommendations to others considering the product:
Good to use for most of business if you use it in a reasonable way. But do not abuse it, it cannot solve all the problems unless you design the system very carefully in the very beginning, especially in large scale critical business problem, which is always hard to solve anyway.


    Internet

Blazing fast, scales well

  • July 17, 2015
  • Review provided by G2

What do you like best?
* Simple to use API
* Wide range of command (list, set, sorted set, hash etc)
* Blazing fast
* Very scalable
What do you dislike?
Clustering was not straight forward, but redis 3.0 solves this
What problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?
1. While redis as a cache like memcache, it offers a lot of advantages with its advanced data structures, which make appending data easier. Also getting partial data out of the cache is possible (using range).
2. Using redis as a database has enabled very high write through puts.
Recommendations to others considering the product:
Get a lot of ram.


    Timothy S.

redis for in-memory data access

  • July 17, 2015
  • Review verified by G2

What do you like best?
The ease of setup and usage of redis is amazing. You can just brew install redis or apt-get install or download and be up and running with a single node in minutes.

The community around redis is very strong with lots of support, examples and documentation.

Redis is an excellent database that has a ton of support clients and drivers for NodeJS, Go, Java, Scala and all the languages that we use.
What do you dislike?
Setting up clustering is a bit hard and there's not a lot of documentation on that. The process just changed, so hopefully it will get better. The enterprise version from RedisLabs is a lot easier to use.

I would like if it connected with things like Mesos and kubernetes easier.
What problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?
We have solved our performance issues by using Redis instead of a RDBMS. Redis is a greatly faster than MYSQL, Postgresql or Oracle for most things we need to do.

Redis is also a great cost saver over commercial cache and in memory solutions as it is free. We just need to pay for our EC2 instances which are fairly small for this.
Recommendations to others considering the product:
Make sure you use the latest 64 bit version and if you can use the RedisLabs clustered version. The creator of Redis, Salvatore works for them and it's really solid.

Redis is great for caching and for real-time data access. We use it as an HTTP session cache, HTTP cache, ORM cache, temporary memory and as instead of memcache.

Redis is a great product and works great with Scala, NodeJS and Java.


    Computer Software

works great depending on use case

  • July 17, 2015
  • Review provided by G2

What do you like best?
simple and easy to use. support is great and documentation is good
What do you dislike?
small feature set. they need to expand the tools and feature set.
What problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?
semi persistent data.


    Information Technology and Services

How to have a fast key value datastore for your app

  • July 17, 2015
  • Review provided by G2

What do you like best?
Speed, easy of config and management of the caches
What do you dislike?
Not easy in clustering option and some options needed more research
What problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?
Gambling company. Caching


    Bryan H.

Solid product with some limitations

  • July 16, 2015
  • Review provided by G2

What do you like best?
Small feature set, predictable performance, auto-expiry of data, very fast, very simple text based protocol, simple administration, easy to understand where your data is and what's happening to it.
What do you dislike?
I can't say I was enormously pleased when they introduced Lua scripting. The main selling point of the data store was it's simplicity and predictable performance. It would have been preferable that a couple more commands be implemented in C rather than bring stored procedures into the mix. That choice was probably based more on product development than customer need, and again the main attraction was the premise of simplicity. In fairness, it's been a couple of years since I last used it in production so perhaps it's worked out really well since then.
What problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?
I've used it for auto-expiring caches, it's great for that particular use-case. Can also be used as a convenient buffer for batch processes. I wouldn't put anything into Redis that I couldn't afford to lose, I guess it's more like memcached in that respect.
Recommendations to others considering the product:
Why not give it a try? It's simple enough that you can get it running in 10 minutes. The basic commands don't take a lot longer to master, and there's some advanced stuff you can do later. I would consider it ideal for transient data storage.


    Josh S.

Redis scratches a lot of itches

  • July 16, 2015
  • Review verified by G2

What do you like best?
The robust data structures that Redis offers are by far my favorite feature. It can be used as a simple key/value store like you would do with Memcached but also allows you to create hash tables to simulate more Mongo-like features as well as lists and sorted sets that can be used for queues, chat systems and leaderboards (basically anything you want sorted). Also, the option to flush to disk and have persistence is pretty awesome.
What do you dislike?
You can't really search through keys (there's a debug command for it, but not for production use) or through values. Sometimes you just want to be able to grab all the hashes that have value X and you simply can't without creating additional keys to track the mapping. This is a shortcoming compared to Mongo where you can still pull documents that contain a specific value. Also, the speed to shutdown and startup larger databases is a tad sluggish.
What problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?
I use Redis for a series of things, specifically a chat system and leaderboards for tracking site activity. I have also used Redis a ton in front of MySQL to serve as a more direct index in scenarios where queries are under performing and the tables are so larger (50m+ rows) that trying to reindex means a chunk of downtime. I also use Redis for user sessions. I am also starting to migrate away from Memcached for basic key/value stores in front of MySQL.
Recommendations to others considering the product:
I wouldn't recommend it as a drop in replacement for MySQL or anything due to the limitations for searching, but for caching as well as queues and scored data (like game leaderboards) it's the only choice.