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Redis 2.8 on Ubuntu

Websoft9 | Redis2.8.24.0 - Ubuntu20.04

Linux/Unix, Ubuntu 20.04 - 64-bit Amazon Machine Image (AMI)

Reviews from AWS Marketplace

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External reviews

105 reviews
from G2

External reviews are not included in the AWS star rating for the product.


    Van A.

Optimal In Memory Store

  • January 18, 2021
  • Review provided by G2

What do you like best?
The flexibility of using it with many programming languages.
What do you dislike?
The lack of UI client
Working in Windows in a pain
Lack of good tutorials and documentation
What problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?
Mainly caching. Pre computing tasks that are required on each API call and save it in the cache. No need to compute if the data is already available in the cache. Saves so much time and CPU consumption.


    Mochammad Z.

My Experience of Using Redis

  • January 18, 2021
  • Review provided by G2

What do you like best?
I can use redis to trigger event based actions in almost real-time. It's lightweight and easy to install on our server. The key-value data is simple too, suitable for simple use like an event parameters or something like that
What do you dislike?
Its reliability is not as good as others. I've got several disconnected events and its not because of network connection. I've debugging it, and the problem is from the redis connection lost without a reason. and when i want to debug its value using Redis Commander its not as friendly as the others
What problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?
I can create a queue too using redis with the help of a plugin (bee-queue). I can send a trigger to another platform on-the-fly after some event triggered. So i can make my action more reactive and real time too.
Recommendations to others considering the product:
Redis is lightweight, powerful, and fast for in-memory database. If you're using it right, it will be give your platform a big boost in performance.
I can use it to trigger another event in another platform in almost realtime. But take cautions, sometime i got Redis Connection lost without any reason (and its not network problem)


    Aram M.

An amazing tool to keep data for cash, and also use as pub/sub mechanism

  • January 18, 2021
  • Review provided by G2

What do you like best?
Mostly that I like is speed to reading and writing key->value data to Redis, It's a very convenient tool to use as a cashing mechanism.
Also, I like the pub/sub mechanism to use it for communication betwin microservices.
What do you dislike?
The only thing that I dislike, is some issues with do querying and to get data with some data with needed conditions
What problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?
Mostly the cashing problems, and to keep the data that should be written and read fast and, for don't store them to that main database.
Recommendations to others considering the product:
If you want to start using microservices for enhancing your product it will a good idea to use Redis as a message broker.


    Computer & Network Security

Redis helped us in reduce the DB load, increasing the ability to serve more users at the same time

  • January 18, 2021
  • Review provided by G2

What do you like best?
Redis is simple to implement yet super efficient.
What do you dislike?
I don't have any subject I don't like about Redis.
What problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?
We have a heavy loaded DB , in our pick hours we get 20K hits/s. Redis alllows us to keep it fast and readable.


    Computer Software

Redis for Distribution Cache

  • January 17, 2021
  • Review verified by G2

What do you like best?
It's provide keys-value store. Distribution of data is easy and reliable. Fast key lookup. Support for many languages.
What do you dislike?
Nothing musch. Redis is single-threaded.
What problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?
We used redis sentinal as cache and store sessions. It's key value store that can use string, hash, list, sets as keys. We used redis as cache because it is fast to access keys and get values. 2 to power 32 keys can store per instant. In case of a failure in Redis cluster, Sentinel will automatically detect the point of failure and bring the cluster back to stable mode.


    Eranga K.

Redis for in Memory Storing.

  • January 15, 2021
  • Review provided by G2

What do you like best?
I like the speed of Redis. Where I usually using Redis for storing the Authentication tokens in the memory. And it returns the response in no time. This can be accessed as a service using a HOST and a PORT, it allowed us to use Redis in a versatile infrastructure. Mostly we can use it as a sharable(Centralised) data store can be accessed from varies ends, it helps us to setup load balanced infrastructure with multiple application mirror servers.
What do you dislike?
Poor querying ability is the only minus I don't like.
What problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?
I saved authentication token in a single sharable Redis Server, which can be accessible from multiple application servers.


    haziq a.

Awesome Product for In memory data storage

  • January 15, 2021
  • Review provided by G2

What do you like best?
latency time, simplicity, keys Time to live
What do you dislike?
there should be a query language. Account roles should be provided
What problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?
we are solving caching related problems with redis. Extremely happy for using this product.
Benefits is that redis is blazingly fast


    Public Safety

I have used Redis for store/cache some informtion and generally I have used this in Laravel

  • January 14, 2021
  • Review provided by G2

What do you like best?
I'm like it's performance and very good tech to store some information that will not be in general DB
What do you dislike?
this That in windows installation of Redisis very hard
What problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?
I have


    Missak b.

The Best Distributed Caching Solution

  • January 14, 2021
  • Review provided by G2

What do you like best?
Redis can be accessed with many programming languages. Easy to work with. Documentation is very clear. Redis is also very fast since it uses key value mechanism.
What do you dislike?
It would have been better to have more complex queries.
What problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?
I have a cron job that I prepopulate data and put it in the queue. Users fetch records from the RAM one by one


    Gabe L.

Perfect Documentation

  • January 13, 2021
  • Review verified by G2

What do you like best?
I use the Redis API in my python web-stack and it is one of the slickest things I have ever had the pleasure of working with. The application that I maintain, deepquill.com, needs to serve a high volume of requests while doing continuous cloud-resource tracking/management and it all has to happen asynchronously, so naturally I turned to Redis for a high speed caching solution. At the time I knew only Postgres and Redis works very differently, so I was new to the whole system. The solution I needed to implement with this database wasn't exactly trivial either, so I was prepared to spend a good amount of time slogging through source code to learn what I needed to alter to get this module to work how I wanted it to. -- To this day I have not seen a single line of it's source code -- It's all there in the documentation, written in plain English with examples and use-cases galore! Even if there were a faster and more reliable caching solution on the market (which there isn't) , I would honestly still pick Redis if only for it's thorough and accessible documentation.
What do you dislike?
The only downside I could identify with this solution is that it is not really meant to store data in a persistent form. At least not by default. Redis does everything in volatile memory (which is why it can be so fast) , and while it is easy to set it up to write your data to disk from time to time (it's maybe 3 lines of code tops), it can potentially be confusing to people who come from a more traditional database and expect their data to still be there after a power cycle. The only people who would really suffer from this misunderstanding are those didn't read the manual though, so don't be one of those and you'll be fine. Just be warned: if you want Redis to record your data in a persistent form, you have to explicitly tell it to do that.
What problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?
I needed to keep track of user activity, resource utilization, message caching, and the status of many containers on many AWS EC2 instances with high time-resolution, and manipulate all of this data in such a way as to make it easy to tell when to do what with which resource (margins are slim so we want to be as efficient possible) Redis handles ALL of this for us and deals with asynchronous operations in a most sane and predictable way. Redis also lets us encrypt all of our data moving between layers, which is pretty badass in my opinion.
Recommendations to others considering the product:
If you are trying to control a secured Redis server using a shell script you want to use a "-a" flag followed by the password. This was the only thing I've found that wasn't explained in the documentation. But now you know!