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Redis 2.8 on Ubuntu

Websoft9 | Redis2.8.24.0 - Ubuntu20.04

Linux/Unix, Ubuntu 20.04 - 64-bit Amazon Machine Image (AMI)

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External reviews

105 reviews
from G2

External reviews are not included in the AWS star rating for the product.


    Higher Education

Excellent alternative to traditional databases when performance is necessary

  • January 12, 2016
  • Review verified by G2

What do you like best?
Redis is an extremely fast, easy to use, and well documented data store. The best aspect of Redis is its ease of use (installing, configuring, and accessing it is a breeze).
What do you dislike?
A downside of Redis is that there is a very large number of commands available to perform all of the different manipulations (almost 200 of them at the time of writing). This allows for great flexibility but requires accessing the documentation very frequently.
What problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?
The problem that Redis solves best over a traditional SQL database is that its in-memory nature makes data entry and retrieval extremely fast. When latency with disk-based databases is an issue, Redis' speed can be used to mitigate this without the need for scaling or adding servers.
Recommendations to others considering the product:
Redis is when used for its intended purpose. For relational data where speed is not a key issue, a traditional SQL database is a better option. When speed is an issue and a disk-based database does not cut it, Redis can serve as a great alternative.

One thing to consider with Redis is that since it is a NoSQL data store, and since it does not enforce any schemas at all, your application code will require a lot of extra logic that would typically be abstracted away to SQL queries. You will have to perform a lot of "book keeping" to keep track of set elements, existing keys, etc. in order to use Redis effectively.


    Gautam K.

Quite Brilliant

  • January 12, 2016
  • Review verified by G2

What do you like best?
I love the simple setup and the sane defaults offered by redis.
What do you dislike?
I wish there were pre-built binaries available for popular Linux distros instead of me downloading and compiling from source.
What problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?
Session Caching.
Recommendations to others considering the product:
Go for it. Redis is something you won't regret.


    Caio C.

Redis is fast and simple

  • January 12, 2016
  • Review provided by G2

What do you like best?
I like how easy is to setup and maintain. Also that is very fast.
What do you dislike?
Some commands names are difficult to understand and its hard to know what they do in an intuitive way.
What problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?
I need to develop an application that required a nosql and real time performance.
Recommendations to others considering the product:
If you need a fast and simple to handle database to use its the right pick.


    Dimitar M.

Redis - essential for high scalability.

  • January 12, 2016
  • Review provided by G2

What do you like best?
I absolutely love the speed of Redis. I like Redis's high level operations and features. Its easy to setup and deploy.
What do you dislike?
The clusterization could be better. It's kinda naive with no master/master replication and monitoring. It's important for me. I hope it gets better.
What problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?
The problem that we solved with Redis was synchronising websocket communication between several nodes using pub/sub. It's easy to setup and works great.
Recommendations to others considering the product:
Always use latest version and stick with proven concepts.


    Abdel K.

Best in memory solution

  • January 10, 2016
  • Review provided by G2

What do you like best?
The best feature I like is the ability to do chain slave replication, to alleviate some of the load on the master. Its also very easy to integrate, regardless of the language you choose.

Another very useful feature of Redis is the ability to do set theory computation easily.
What do you dislike?
There is very little to dislike about Redis. The only thing I can complain about is clustering. Its not very easy to setup a cluster but once you get the hang of it, then it becomes a bit easier.
What problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?
We used Redis to do a all of our set theory computation on data we retrieve from social media. With the built in sets, it was a perfect off the self solution.
Recommendations to others considering the product:
If your considering a caching solution or some number crunching. Redis is perfect.


    Ross S.

In-memory database that feels like variables on steroids

  • January 08, 2016
  • Review verified by G2

What do you like best?
If you are not a fan of heavy databases or any at all, Redis is the perfect one for you when you really need one.

1. In-memory database - Play with it, set variables, change them, close it whenever you feel like and nothing touches the disk unless you save explicitly. This is precisely why it is one of the fastest one around - it easily beats mysql and others in read/write cycle benchmarks.

2. Variables with timeout - Set and expire variables with a timeout, very handy for cache and other applications as the expiration is native.

3. Simple type of variables, learn in less than a day - It supports a handful number of variables like string, array and hashes, almost similar to what every programming language already has - so it feels second nature to deal with them in redis db, if the client library handles the type conversion itself. In python, redis-py does it well.

4. Batch read/write with pipelines - Run multiple commands in a single batch and return all the read operation results at once, which helps optimises the read/write operations but most importantly ensures that no other command run in parallel will run in between them.
What do you dislike?
1. No integer type - It has all those good old simple variable types, but still I miss the ability to just save some integers and get them back in the same form. Currently, you must store them as string and after getting it back, convert them back to int explicitly.

2. No array sub-operations - Arrays can be stored as such, but there is no option to change part of the list in-place, without replacing the whole one i.e. for eg. to replace the i-th value with j-th value.

3. Windows in not officially supported, only ported by MSOpenTech - As Windows doesn't enjoy official support and I am primarily a Windows user, I don't like the fact that new versions are usually not available for long time before they are ported over to Windows. Despite all that, MSOpenTech owes my respect for maintaining and porting it so well.
What problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?
I am generally not a fan of heavy databases and didn't think I would actually need that at all, except when I needed - it was not because the data was large, but because it needed reads and writes from multiple processes running in two remote machines. I turned to Redis as I had heard that it is very simple to get started with and is really fast. And to my surprise, it really did work like a breeze.

For python projects, redis-py is the official redis client library and it mostly just maps from redis commands to methods, like get, set and hmgetall, but it also supports transactions and others.

Benefits -
The code went from supporting just one machine (variables in python) to N number of remote machines (via redis) in just one day. It became only a matter of installing redis-cli on all remote machines and reading the data off the master redis database.
Recommendations to others considering the product:
If you are looking for an alternative to Mysql, Redis is not it. It cant cope with large databases which can't be retained in memory.

Redis is more of a short and sweet thing that can handle relatively small number of variables with high throughput and is easy to deploy.


    Hospital & Health Care

DB Action needs redis

  • December 30, 2015
  • Review provided by G2

What do you like best?
For rapidly changing data with a foreseeable database size (should fit mostly in memory).
Disk-backed in-memory database,
Master-slave replication, automatic failover
Simple values or data structures by keys
What do you dislike?
Data set size limited to computer RAM (but can span multiple machines' RAM with clustering)
Complex operations like ZREVRANGEBYSCORE.
Bit operations (for example to implement bloom filters)
What problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?
To store real-time stock prices. Real-time analytics. Leaderboards. Real-time communication. And wherever you used memcached before.
Has sets (also union/diff/inter)
Has lists (also a queue; blocking pop)
Has hashes (objects of multiple fields)
Sorted sets (high score table, good for range queries)
Lua scripting capabilities (!)
Has transactions (!)
Values can be set to expire (as in a cache)
Pub/Sub lets one implement messaging
Recommendations to others considering the product:
Give redis a try


    Internet

Great experience with Redis

  • August 14, 2015
  • Review verified by G2

What do you like best?
Super fast response times (main purpose of redis)
What do you dislike?
Data is stored in memory (needed for the quick retrieval of the data). This is generally not an issue, however very large datasets (> 250 GB) can't be fully stored in the memory and redis might not the best option for very large sets.
What problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?
Fast retrieval of product recommendations. Normal SQL requests take too long with larger datasets. Redis requires that the data is organized differently, but the extra work upfront pays off with every data request.


    Prashanth G S.

Used as a cache between DB and application

  • July 31, 2015
  • Review provided by G2

What do you like best?
The data structure in Redis are very helpful. The set operations helped in efficiently organizing the data and less operation needed from our end. We maintained all the Database relationship in Redis for faster access.
What do you dislike?
No operation on the keys can be performed. Like sorting list based on key. There is a work around, which didn't perfectly fit well
What problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?
The main problem was to make the client as light as possible. Fetching data from DB was really slow for our flask application. So we thought Redis was the way to go. Where all the data are cached with drastically reduced the REST response time.
Recommendations to others considering the product:
Easily to use. Can build a prototype in a week(depends on what you want to do). Highly recommend to use


    Internet

Amazed by the response time and works great for applications that need high read and write access.

  • July 23, 2015
  • Review provided by G2

What do you like best?
As mentioned in the title, Redis is fast and accurate. This makes certain tasks easier since most of the times, we don't have to rely on data stored on disk.
What do you dislike?
To be honest, I didn't use Redis for considerable amount of time to nit pick anything. All in all, I liked it as it was.
What problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?
So we wanted to store the customer profile information and we didn't wanted to use relational databases since it becomes too complicated to use. In essence to Redis, it is very easy to change the structure and I don't have to write big queries to fetch customer related information.
Recommendations to others considering the product:
Improvements on documentation would certainly help.