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Secured MariaDB Server 10.5 for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8

Kurian | MariaDB 10.5for RHEL 8.3 20210606

Linux/Unix, Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.3 - 64-bit Amazon Machine Image (AMI)

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External reviews

173 reviews
from G2

External reviews are not included in the AWS star rating for the product.


    Stan P.

replaced informix and mysql with mariadb 4 years ago

  • April 15, 2015
  • Review provided by G2

What do you like best?
drop in replacement for mysql (storage engines renamed but there); new aria storage engine. back to being open source after mysql/oracle purchase- original engineers and new contributors should succeed to match/pass mysql installations. gradually replacing mysql in popular linux distributions
What do you dislike?
aria still seems to need more work. overall probably still playing catch-up to postgres but can get there
What problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?
worked on a project in past job as both developer and administrator, to migrate from informix to mysql, then to mariadb under linux. This saved thousands of dollars on licensing fees for informix and unix and eventually resulted in a more stable database for the business application
Recommendations to others considering the product:
If you are familiar with mysql, switching to mariadb should be quite easy. If it doesn't quite match your needs the source is available and you can modify things as needed. I was already familiar with the sources under mysql; mysys, sql, myisam, etc., and the work done there mapped across quite nicely to maria (none would have been needed if I had used the handler interface, but I had used the myisam storage engine directly)


    Simon P.

Replication and High Availability

  • April 15, 2015
  • Review provided by G2

What do you like best?
The set-up of replication is quick and straight forward.

If running Windows, then edit the hosts file located in:
/windows/system32/drivers/etc

On Linux:
/etc

Add entries for each database server to the hosts files with alias's:
192.168.1.100 server1.db.com
192.168.1.101 server2.db.com

Install mariadb on both systems.

Edit the 'cnf' file on each system, server1:
server-id=1
replicate-same-server-id=0
auto_increment_increment=2
auto_increment_offset=1
master-host=server2.db.com
master-user=repl
master-password=testpw
master-connect-retry=60
replicate-do-db=rat
log-bin="D:/MySQL/Data/"
binlog-do-db=rat
relay-log="D:/MySQL/Data/slave-relay.log"
relay-log-index="D:/MySQL/Data/slave-relay-log.index"
expire_logs_days=10
max_binlog_size=500M

Add to my.ini, mysqld section on server2:
server-id = 2
replicate-same-server-id=0
auto-increment-increment=2
auto-increment-offset=2
master-host=server1.db.com
master-user=repl
master-password=testpw
master-connect-retry=60
replicate-do-db=rat
log-bin=mysql-bin
binlog-do-db=rat
relay-log=slave-relay-log.index
expire_logs_days=10
max_binlog_size=500M

Of couse you have to edit the paths and passwords according to your own set-up.

Export the database from server1 with:
mysqldump -u root -p:##### dbname >db.sql

Import the dumped sql file into server2.

If error encountered when trying to change master to master_host, try:
reset slave;

Add firewall exceptions for port 3306 TCP/UDP or systems will not be able to connect to each other.

Use telnet to test if each system can see the other using:
telnet name 3306

Where name is the server alias.

Try to connect to the remote database using mysql:
mysql -u username -ppassword -h hostname -P 3306

Using a user name and password and the host name according to your set-up.
What do you dislike?
A wizard based set-up for the replication would be a nice feature.
What problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?
Replication, redundancy and single point of failure.


    Sameer V.

MariaDB is true open source database worth more than MySQL and for that matter Oracle too.

  • April 14, 2015
  • Review verified by G2

What do you like best?
We like pretty much everything about MariaDB. Easy replacement for MySQL. Text search features, dynamic column etc.
What do you dislike?
The Java Client support seems to be a bit rough
What problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?
A deployable database solution for our customer deployments with zero "0" amount of maintenance overhead
Recommendations to others considering the product:
Try MariaDB and you might not want to use any other DB