Sign in
Categories
Your Saved List Partners Sell in AWS Marketplace Amazon Web Services Home Help

Jenkins Automation Server on Windows Server 2019

Tidal Media Inc | 1.0.3

Windows, Windows Server 2019 Base Windows 2019 - 64-bit Amazon Machine Image (AMI)

Reviews from AWS Marketplace

0 AWS reviews
  • 5 star
    0
  • 4 star
    0
  • 3 star
    0
  • 2 star
    0
  • 1 star
    0

External reviews

325 reviews
from G2

External reviews are not included in the AWS star rating for the product.


    Ashish M.

Jenkins is best opensource CI tool so far

  • July 08, 2015
  • Review verified by G2

What do you like best?
Best is this is opensource and large community is following this.
UI is very simple and admin things are easy to follow.
Never ending plugins are available. You just think what you want to do and probably you will get a plugin.
Initial setup of jenkins server is very easy.
Lot of documentations available to help deploy with tomcat.
Adding client nodes is super easy. Just fill in minimum details and you are done.
Configuration page is very versatile and gives you lots and lots of options to use for your job.
What do you dislike?
I experienced lot of HEAP space issues. Many times i have fixed that with more heap space in CATALINA, but i think Jenkins should be able to handle it on its own.
Also, I found some lack of documentations on plugins. Jenkins is easy to setup but later on it takes time to use some complex plugins which are not very straightforward and need some pre-configuration in administration.
What problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?
Daily builds, nightly builds, automation testing, other utility jobs
Recommendations to others considering the product:
Its opensourse and once you started with this and realize its power, you cant stop using it


    Steve H.

Jenkins is one of the better-known self-hosted java-based CI servers

  • July 06, 2015
  • Review verified by G2

What do you like best?
Jenkins was forked from Hudson, one of the early CI servers. At the time Hudson came out, Cruise Control was what most were resigned to, which required a lot more care and feeding. For its part, Hudson is very simple to set up, in theory; just run the WAR file. It works out of the box, has probably the largest user base of the self-hosted solutions, and plugins for most everything you'd want to integrate into your workflow. Or you can write your own plugin, using any JVM-friendly language (it's not just for Java anymore).

Building custom forms in order to provide options for automated builds is fun and easy.

Very configurable by itself. If you need to cobble something together quickly, you can always drop down into a shell script.

No doubt, hosted solutions like Solano and Travis are sexier. But they also cost money, and by definition they have eyes on your data. That rules them out for shops where HIPPA or other security policies have to be followed.
What do you dislike?
The plugin ecosystem is poorly managed. It's unclear which combination of plugins are safe to use together. Many are readily available for inclusion, but haven't been supported in years, or will only work on older versions of Hudson.

Given this, sometimes it's NECESSARY to cobble something together.
What problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?
Other than standard CI workflows, I used Jenkins at a financial services company as a means to kick off compliance tests. Non-technical users had an easy HTML form where they can select they combinations of tests they want to run, the locales to run them in, the environment to target the tests against, etc. Artifacts such as screenshots and audit logs are readily available and preserved in a way that makes sense to the business. Tests are run on a schedule, or before a big release.
Recommendations to others considering the product:
If you require a self-hosted solution, Hudson will likely have what you need, but it may require a few trips to the forums. Happily there's still a large user base. OTOH, TeamCity is free for smaller teams, and may prove easier to set up and maintain.


    Jayesh V.

Very Good Continues Intigration tool with lots off features.

  • May 29, 2015
  • Review provided by G2

What do you like best?
We can implement fully automated system for build creation to build deployment on QA server and start our automation to newly deployed build. Its awesome tool provides some enhanced functionality like automatic email integration failure analysis etc..
What do you dislike?
Once we create job we can not delete. So after long times lots off job would be created. some times this make confusion.
What problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?
We are using Jenkins in continues integration system for automatic creating and deploying build as well as running automation on newly created build.
Recommendations to others considering the product:
Its awesome tool for continues integration i ever seen in my professional career. I fully recommend this tool to every one who want to implement CI system for his product.


    Computer Games

Easy to use

  • May 28, 2015
  • Review provided by G2

What do you like best?
It was easy to use, set up and has lots of plugins for any project type
What do you dislike?
nothing, jenkins did everything we needed at the time
What problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?
Build Automation
Recommendations to others considering the product:
worth a shot


    Information Technology and Services

The standard in open source CI

  • May 28, 2015
  • Review verified by G2

What do you like best?
Jenkins has been around for a long time, has a rich, supportive community, and a vast array of plugins.
What do you dislike?
Working with Java apps has never been my favorite. This is purely preference. I've always focused on other languages and tools. However, Jenkins is basically unmatched in terms of open source CI solutions.
What problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?
We use Jenkins for automated testing. When code is pushed, Jenkins runs our full test suite on a fresh EC2 instance, which is burned immediately after.
Recommendations to others considering the product:
If you don't require a self hosted solution, look into SaaS CI solutions. I personally prefer to do everything in-house, and my team agrees.


    Carlos C.

Jenkins please deploy

  • May 28, 2015
  • Review provided by G2

What do you like best?
Jenkins is very easy to use.
There is plugin for .
What do you dislike?
The web-UI is old fashioned.
There is no default Error highlight on the console.
What problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?
We use jenkins for running automated tests.
We use jenkins to deploy new software on development, staging and live environments.


    Sreeram (Sam) K.

Great Build/Release/DevOps tools with a Poor UI

  • May 15, 2015
  • Review provided by G2

What do you like best?
- Compartmentalize jobs
- Seamless hooking up nodes and determining load on each
- Good (not great) user security
- All the basics of getting one up and running very quickly
What do you dislike?
- UI cannot be handed off to engineers to "self-serve" because its not very intuitive
- Scheduling can be very easily configured as check-boxes but is very non-intutive as cronjob style format
What problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?
- Automation of Build and deployment processes
- Server disk space administration of nodes
Recommendations to others considering the product:
Install it as a webapp in Tomcat. You can get started in literally 1/2 hr


    Peter B.

Best build manager

  • May 14, 2015
  • Review provided by G2

What do you like best?
It's fast and easy to use. Setup is very simple. And you can do just about anything. Plus, there are a ton of useful plugins.
What do you dislike?
LDAP and user management is harder than it needs to be.
What problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?
We use jenkins for nightly builds, continuous integration builds, and to manage product builds using a repeatable process.
Recommendations to others considering the product:
Find someone with experience using it. While it's a flexible tool that takes little effort to start using, making it useful takes more work. Develop a process, and make it work for you and your product. Find plugins, there are so many.


    Fabian V.

A happy Jenkins user!

  • May 05, 2015
  • Review provided by G2

What do you like best?
It's fast! It integrates very well with Github. Saves as a lot of time and headaches.
What do you dislike?
The UI can be tricky, sometimes you need to click over 4-5 times to find what you want to see.
What problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?
We use Jenkins to automatically test all new branches, and PRs done to our Github repositories.
Recommendations to others considering the product:
Just try it! You're going to love it. Integrate with Github for a better experience.


    carolyn v.

Some great features but a poor user interface and user experience

  • May 04, 2015
  • Review verified by G2

What do you like best?
i like the capabilities it has of running concurrent builds, allowing custom views, and integrations with popular 3rd party applications like hipchat, etc via plugins
What do you dislike?
the upgrade process is painful. every time we try to upgrade jenkins and/or plugins, things end up hanging and we have to kill various processes and it's never straightforward. the user interface is also hideous. it's like a UI from 1992. awful. the user experience is also painful. there's so many clicks to get to things and it's not intuitive on how to get to other things. i can't seem to figure out how to rearrange the ordering of views on the dashboard, for example. i'd like to access private views easily vs shared views.
What problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?
we have multiple projects with multiple deployment tiers for each (e.g, dev and test) and we need projects to automatically kick off being built at certain tiers when checkins happen. it's been very beneficial to have things automated from a CI perspective using jenkins. we can see immediately what things are breaking the build so people can fix them/address them as they are notified in real-time in hipchat and emails. no lags is key.