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Chef Automate (First 10 nodes free)

Chef | 1.8.85

Linux/Unix, CentOS 7.2 - 64-bit Amazon Machine Image (AMI)

Reviews from AWS Marketplace

18 AWS reviews

External reviews

39 reviews
from G2

External reviews are not included in the AWS star rating for the product.


3-star reviews ( Show all reviews )

    AwsConte413b

Great for configuration management and integration, especially in AWS

  • January 06, 2019
  • Review verified by AWS Marketplace

We use it for training.
How has it helped my organization?
All the Chef enthusiasts who come to us to learn and train, improve their skillsets to get jobs. It's a really easy product in AWS. It's easy to teach and easy to understand.
What is most valuable?
The most valuable feature is the language that it uses: Ruby.
Regarding integration and configuration of the product, they're pretty manageable. The layers are really easy to configure.
What needs improvement?
I would like to see more security features for Chef and more automation.
What do I think about the stability of the solution?
It's working great. It's stable. We try to produce real-world scenarios with the students as much as possible.
How was the initial setup?
It's a really easy product in AWS. It's easy to teach and easy to understand.
Which other solutions did I evaluate?
We considered Puppet and Ansible. We went with Chef because Chef uses Ruby and Ruby is pretty popular right now.
What other advice do I have?
Compare it to the other services that you use.


    Sharath A.

Its recipes are easy to write and move across different servers and environments. However, they need to provide better functionalities when creating recipes.

  • December 05, 2018
  • Review verified by AWS Marketplace

Our primary use case is having the properties set up across the servers. We have Chef recipes deployed and configured across our servers, so we get the same type of replication across our servers and environments.
We are using the on-premise version. We have our applications already set up for on-premise. We are using Chef and preparing it for CI/CD and other properties. Now, we are planning ahead and will use the AWS service too.
How has it helped my organization?
Earlier, we used to do everything manually, such as configuring the servers across different environments. Using Chef and Puppet, we can automate our CI/CD process with reduced effort from our DevOps team.
What is most valuable?
Chef recipes are easy to write and move across different servers and environments.
What needs improvement?
They could provide more features, so the recipes could be developed in a simpler and faster way. There is still a lot of room for improvement, providing better functionalities when creating recipes.
We would also like more recipes. This is key for us.
For how long have I used the solution?
Less than one year.
What do I think about the stability of the solution?
We do put a lot of stress on it from the QA, staging, and servers. We have a CI/CD pipeline continuously running as the developer commits the code to Chef and Puppet, which are always up and running.
What do I think about the scalability of the solution?
The scalability is working well for our organization.
How is customer service and technical support?
As a developer, I don't use the technical support.
What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?
We are still in the process of evaluating Chef Compute. Currently, we use Chef and Puppet. Soon, we will probably be purchasing it from AWS Marketplace.
Which other solutions did I evaluate?
We were already using Chef and Puppet for most of our DevOps. These were our only choices.
What other advice do I have?
I would definitely recommend using Chef.
Chef integrates and configures well with AWS and other products. We use Chef and Puppet together. We are also using Splunk for log traces. We just started using Chef with AWS for easy to use containers. AWS is great for storage, CloudFormation, and CloudFrond CDN.


    Deano

Bad Gateway - and how to fix

  • March 04, 2018
  • Review verified by AWS Marketplace

I had the same Bad Gateway errors as the other reviewers. I did a little digging and found a fix.

ssh on and then

sudo chef-server-ctl upgrade


    Christopher M.

Chef'ing up Liferay

  • November 22, 2017
  • Review provided by G2

What do you like best?
I like chef because it uses DSL for configuration instead of XML, Rackspace supports it very well, etc. However the absolute best thing about Chef is the concept of recipes where you can get your platform up and configured extremely easily if that platform has a chef recipe. In addition most large platforms do have chef recipes so it's great! Also, I like that it;s open source
What do you dislike?
Some of the things i dislike about chef, and this might jkust be a criticism of configuration management in general, is that you need pretty much a full team to support it. Sometimes I feel like it adds more complexity instead of kless.
What problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?
The biggest issue we are solving with Chef is the knowledge gap that exists in new employees when first learning out platforms. previous it would take months for new developers to become effective because they spend several months fighting with the platform, build tools, etc. Chef makes this much less of a hassle
Recommendations to others considering the product:
Learn it well before you try to incorporate it in your enterprise


    Kevin V.

Great tool for system configuration management

  • April 07, 2016
  • Review verified by G2

What do you like best?
Chef is pretty solid for configuration management of Windows machines and ensuring that they are all setup and provisioned the same way. The setup and scripting of recipes is pretty extensive, and Windows support is solid. There are a variety of recipes to do most windows configuration needed, as well as Linux.
What do you dislike?
The setup is pretty complex, it can take awhile to just setup a server and figure out how to connect a client to it. It would be nice to have more functionality exposed in the Chef GUI, using command line for a majority of tasks can be tedious at times. Chef is mainly geared toward ensuring a server is configured properly, but it would be nice to have the option for 'one off' tasks. When you have agents already running on your systems for Chef it would be nice to run a task on a subset of machines instead of yet another agent and management system for that. It also runs best if you have a person dedicated to the configuration and on going maintenance of Chef. It takes some effort to keep up on your recipes.
What problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?
Chef solves the system configuration management issue pretty well, it is able to ensure that machines are setup similarly. The 'configuration as code' aspect makes it clear to the organization what is involved in setting up and configuration of a server. It helps to document the process as long as you follow through on continuously adding recipes as you move along.
Recommendations to others considering the product:
If you are using Azure, check out Microsoft's Azure lab on setting up Chef, it significantly speeds up the implementation process. Be sure to run through some tutorials and documentation on the Chef website as it is very difficult to setup straight out of the box. There aren't really any wizards or in-product tutorials.


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