AWS Blog

AWS Enables Consortium Science to Accelerate Discovery

by Jeff Barr | on | in Guest Post | | Comments

My colleague Mia Champion is a scientist (check out her publications), an AWS Certified Solutions Architect, and an AWS Certified Developer. The time that she spent doing research on large-data datasets gave her an appreciation for the value of cloud computing in the bioinformatics space, which she summarizes and explains in the guest post below!

Jeff;


Technological advances in scientific research continue to enable the collection of exponentially growing datasets that are also increasing in the complexity of their content. The global pace of innovation is now also fueled by the recent cloud-computing revolution, which provides researchers with a seemingly boundless scalable and agile infrastructure. Now, researchers can remove the hindrances of having to own and maintain their own sequencers, microscopes, compute clusters, and more. Using the cloud, scientists can easily store, manage, process and share datasets for millions of patient samples with gigabytes and more of data for each individual. As American physicist, John Bardeen once said: “Science is a collaborative effort. The combined results of several people working together is much more effective than could be that of an individual scientist working alone”.

Prioritizing Reproducible Innovation, Democratization, and Data Protection
Today, we have many individual researchers and organizations leveraging secure cloud enabled data sharing on an unprecedented scale and producing innovative, customized analytical solutions using the AWS cloud.  But, can secure data sharing and analytics be done on such a collaborative scale as to revolutionize the way science is done across a domain of interest or even across discipline/s of science? Can building a cloud-enabled consortium of resources remove the analytical variability that leads to diminished reproducibility, which has long plagued the interpretability and impact of research discoveries? The answers to these questions are ‘yes’ and initiatives such as the Neuro Cloud Consortium, The Global Alliance for Genomics and Health (GA4GH), and The Sage Bionetworks Synapse platform, which powers many research consortiums including the DREAM challenges, are starting to put into practice model cloud-initiatives that will not only provide impactful discoveries in the areas of neuroscience, infectious disease, and cancer, but are also revolutionizing the way in which scientific research is done.

Bringing Crowd Developed Models, Algorithms, and Functions to the Data
Collaborative projects have traditionally allowed investigators to download datasets such as those used for comparative sequence analysis or for training a deep learning algorithm on medical imaging data. Investigators were then able to develop and execute their analysis using institutional clusters, local workstations, or even laptops:

This method of collaboration is problematic for many reasons. The first concern is data security, since dataset download essentially permits “chain-data-sharing” with any number of recipients. Second, analytics done using compute environments that are not templated at some level introduces the risk of variable analytics that itself is not reproducible by a different investigator, or even the same investigator using a different compute environment. Third, the required data dump, processing, and then re-upload or distribution to the collaborative group is highly inefficient and dependent upon each individual’s networking and compute capabilities. Overall, traditional methods of scientific collaboration have introduced methods in which security is compromised and time to discovery is hampered.

Using the AWS cloud, collaborative researchers can share datasets easily and securely by taking advantage of Identity and Access Management (IAM) policy restrictions for user bucket access as well as S3 bucket policies or Access Control Lists (ACLs). To streamline analysis and ensure data security, many researchers are eliminating the necessity to download datasets entirely by leveraging resources that facilitate moving the analytics to the data source and/or taking advantage of remote API requests to access a shared database or data lake. One way our customers are accomplishing this is to leverage container based Docker technology to provide collaborators with a way to submit algorithms or models for execution on the system hosting the shared datasets:

Docker container images have all of the application’s dependencies bundled together, and therefore provide a high degree of versatility and portability, which is a significant advantage over using other executable-based approaches. In the case of collaborative machine learning projects, each docker container will contain applications, language runtime, packages and libraries, as well as any of the more popular deep learning frameworks commonly used by researchers including: MXNet, Caffe, TensorFlow, and Theano.

A common feature in these frameworks is the ability to leverage a host machine’s Graphical Processing Units (GPUs) for significant acceleration of the matrix and vector operations involved in the machine learning computations. As such, researchers with these objectives can leverage EC2’s new P2 instance types in order to power execution of submitted machine learning models. In addition, GPUs can be mounted directly to containers using the NVIDIA Docker tool and appear at the system level as additional devices. By leveraging Amazon EC2 Container Service and the EC2 Container Registry, collaborators are able to execute analytical solutions submitted to the project repository by their colleagues in a reproducible fashion as well as continue to build on their existing environment.  Researchers can also architect a continuous deployment pipeline to run their docker-enabled workflows.

In conclusion, emerging cloud-enabled consortium initiatives serve as models for the broader research community for how cloud-enabled community science can expedite discoveries in Precision Medicine while also providing a platform where data security and discovery reproducibility is inherent to the project execution.

Mia D. Champion, Ph.D.

 

Amazon Inspector Update – Assessment Reporting, Proxy Support, and More

by Jeff Barr | on | in Amazon Inspector | | Comments

Amazon Inspector is our automated security assessment service. It analyzes the behavior of the applications that you run in AWS and helps you to identify potential security issues. In late 2015 I introduced you to Inspector and showed you how to use it (Amazon Inspector – Automated Security Assessment Service). You start by using tags to define the collection of AWS resources that make up your application (also known as the assessment target). Then you create a security assessment template and specify the set of rules that you would like to run as part of the assessment:

After you create the assessment target and the security assessment template, you can run it against the target resources with a click. The assessment makes use of an agent that runs on your Linux and Windows-based EC2 instances (read about AWS Agents to learn more). You can process the assessments manually or you can forward the findings to your existing ticketing system using AWS Lambda (read Scale Your Security Vulnerability Testing with Amazon Inspector to see how to do this).

Whether you run one instance or thousands, we recommend that you run assessments on a regular and frequent basis. You can run them on your development and integration instances as part of your DevOps pipeline; this will give you confidence that the code and the systems that you deploy to production meet the conditions specified by the rule packages that you selected when you created the security assessment template. You should also run frequent assessments against production systems in order to guard against possible configuration drift.

We have recently added some powerful new features to Amazon Inspector:

  • Assessment Reports – The new assessment reports provide a comprehensive summary of the assessment, beginning with an executive summary. The reports are designed to be shared with teams and with leadership, while also serving as documentation for compliance audits.
  • Proxy Support – You can now configure the agent to run within proxy environments (many of our customers have been asking for this).
  • CloudWatch Metrics – Inspector now publishes metrics to Amazon CloudWatch so that you can track and observe changes over time.
  • Amazon Linux 2017.03 Support – This new version of the Amazon Linux AMI is launching today and Inspector supports it now.

Assessment Reports
After an assessment runs completes, you can download a detailed assessment report in HTML or PDF form:

The report begins with a cover page and executive summary:

Then it summarizes the assessment rules and the targets that were tested:

Then it summarizes the findings for each rules package:

Because the report is intended to serve as documentation for compliance audits, it includes detailed information about each finding, along with recommendations for remediation:

The full report also indicates which rules were checked and passed for all target instances:

Proxy Support
The Inspector agent can now communicate with Inspector through an HTTPS proxy. For Linux instances, we support HTTPS Proxy, and for Windows instances, we support WinHTTP proxy. See the Amazon Inspector User Guide for instructions to configure Proxy support for the AWS Agent.

CloudWatch Metrics
Amazon Inspector now publishes metrics to Amazon CloudWatch after each run. The metrics are categorized by target and by template. An aggregate metric, which indicates how many assessment runs have been performed in the AWS account, is also available. You can find the metrics in the CloudWatch console, as usual:

Here are the metrics that are published on a per-target basis:

And here are the per-template metrics:

Amazon Linux 2017.03 Support
Many AWS customers use the Amazon Linux AMI and automatically upgrade as new versions become available. In order to provide these customers with continuous coverage from Amazon Inspector, we are now making sure that this and future versions of the AMI are supported by Amazon Inspector on launch day.

Available Now
All of these features are available now and you can start using them today!

Pricing is based on a per-agent, per-assessment basis and starts at $0.30 per assessment, declining to as low at $0.05 per assessment when you run 45,000 or more assessments per month (see the Amazon Inspector Pricing page for more information).

Jeff;

Announcing the AWS Chatbot Challenge – Create Conversational, Intelligent Chatbots using Amazon Lex and AWS Lambda

by Tara Walker | on | in Amazon Lex, AWS Lambda, Developers | | Comments

If you have been checking out the launches and announcements from the AWS 2017 San Francisco Summit, you may be aware that the Amazon Lex service is now Generally Available, and you can use the service today. Amazon Lex is a fully managed AI service that enables developers to build conversational interfaces into any application using voice and text. Lex uses the same deep learning technologies of Amazon Alexa-powered devices like Amazon Echo. With the release of Amazon Lex, developers can build highly engaging lifelike user experiences and natural language interactions within their own applications. Amazon Lex supports Slack, Facebook Messenger, and Twilio SMS enabling you to easily publish your voice or text chatbots using these popular chat services. There is no better time to try out the Amazon Lex service to add the gift of gab to your applications, and now you have a great reason to get started.

May I have a Drumroll please?

I am thrilled to announce the AWS Chatbot Challenge! The AWS Chatbot Challenge is your opportunity to build a unique chatbot that helps solves a problem or adds value for prospective users. The AWS Chatbot Challenge is brought to you by Amazon Web Services in partnership with Slack.



The Challenge

Your mission, if you choose to accept it, is to build a conversational, natural language chatbot using Amazon Lex and leverage Lex’s integration with AWS Lambda to execute logic or data processing on the backend. Your submission can be a new or existing bot, however, if your bot is an existing one it must have been updated to use Amazon Lex and AWS Lambda within the challenge submission period.

 

You are only limited by your own imagination when building your solution. Therefore, I will share some recommendations to help you to get your creative juices flowing when creating or deploying your bot. Some suggestions that can help you make your chatbot more distinctive are:

  • Deploy your bot to Slack, Facebook Messenger, or Twilio SMS
  • Take advantage of other AWS services when building your bot solution.
  • Incorporate Text-To-speech capabilities using a service like Amazon Polly
  • Utilize other third-party APIs, SDKs, and services
  • Leverage Amazon Lex pre-built enterprise connectors and add services like Salesforce, HubSpot, Marketo, Microsoft Dynamics, Zendesk, and QuickBooks as data sources.

There are cost effective ways to build your bot using AWS Lambda. Lambda includes a free tier of one million requests and 400,000 GB-seconds of compute time per month. This free, per month usage, is for all customers and does not expire at the end of the 12 month Free Tier Term. Furthermore, new Amazon Lex customers can process up to 10,000 text requests and 5,000 speech requests per month free during the first year. You can find details here.

Remember, the AWS Free Tier includes services with a free tier available for 12 months following your AWS sign-up date, as well as additional service offers that do not automatically expire at the end of your 12 month term. You can review the details about the AWS Free Tier and related services by going to the AWS Free Tier Details page.

 

Can We Talk – How It Works

The AWS Chatbot Challenge is open to individuals, and teams of individuals, who have reached the age of majority in their eligible area of residence at the time of competition entry. Organizations that employ 50 or fewer people are also eligible to compete as long at the time of entry they are duly organized or incorporated and validly exist in an eligible area. Large organizations-employing more than 50-in eligible areas can participate but will only be eligible for a non-cash recognition prize.

Chatbot Submissions are judged using the following criteria:

  • Customer Value: The problem or painpoint the bot solves and the extent it adds value for users
  • Bot Quality: The unique way the bot solves users’ problems, and the originality, creativity, and differentiation of the bot solution
  • Bot Implementation: Determination of how well the bot was built and executed by the developer. Also, consideration of bot functionality such as if the bot functions as intended and recognizes and responds to most common phrases asked of it

Prizes

The AWS Chatbot Challenge is awarding prizes for your hard work!

First Prize

  • $5,000 USD
  • $2,500 AWS Credits
  • Two (2) tickets to AWS re:Invent
  • 30 minute virtual meeting with the Amazon Lex team
  • Winning submission featured on the AWS AI blog
  • Cool swag

Second Prize

  • $3,000 USD
  • $1,500 AWS Credits
  • One (1) ticket to AWS re:Invent
  • 30 minute virtual meeting with the Amazon Lex team
  • Winning submission featured on the AWS AI blog
  • Cool swag

Third Prize

  • $2,000 USD
  • $1,000 AWS Credits
  • 30 minute virtual meeting with the Amazon Lex team
  • Winning submission featured on the AWS AI blog
  • Cool swag

 

Challenge Timeline

  • Submissions Start: April 19, 2017 at 12:00pm PDT
  • Submissions End: July 18, 2017 at 5:00pm PDT
  • Winners Announced: August 11, 2017 at 9:00am PDT

 

Up to the Challenge – Get Started

Are ready to get started on your chatbot and dive into the challenge? Here is how to get started:

Review the details on the challenge rules and eligibility

  1. Register for the AWS Chatbot Challenge
  2. Join the AWS Chatbot Slack Channel
  3. Create an account on AWS.
  4. Visit the Resources page for links to documentation and resources.
  5. Shoot your demo video that demonstrates your bot in action. Prepare a written summary of your bot and what it does.
  6. Provide a way to access your bot for judging and testing by including a link to your GitHub repo hosting the bot code and all deployment files and testing instructions needed for testing your bot.
  7. Submit your bot on AWSChatbot2017.Devpost.com before July 18, 2017 at 5 pm ET and share access to your bot, its Github repo and its deployment files.

Summary

With Amazon Lex you can build conversation into web and mobile applications, as well as use it to build chatbots that control IoT devices, provide customer support, give transaction updates or perform operations for DevOps workloads (ChatOps). Amazon Lex provides built-in integration with AWS Lambda, AWS Mobile Hub, and Amazon CloudWatch and allows for easy integrate with other AWS services so you can use the AWS platform for to build security, monitoring, user authentication, business logic, and storage into your chatbot or application. You can make additional enhancements to your voice or text chatbot by taking advantage of Amazon Lex’s support of chat services like Slack, Facebook Messenger, and Twilio SMS.

Dive into building chatbots and conversational interfaces with Amazon Lex and AWS Lambda with the AWS Chatbot Challenge for a chance to win some cool prizes. Some recent resources and online tech talks about creating bots with Amazon Lex and AWS Lambda that may help you in your bot building journey are:

If you have questions about the AWS Chatbot Challenge you can email aws-chatbot-challenge-2017@amazon.com or post a question to the Discussion Board.

 

Good Luck and Happy Coding.

Tara

AWS Online Tech Talks – April 2017

by Jeff Barr | on | in Events, Webinars | | Comments

I’m a life-long learner! I try to set aside some time every day to read about or to try something new. I grew up in the 1960’s and 1970’s, back before the Internet existed. As a teenager, access to technical information of any sort was difficult, expensive, and time-consuming. It often involved begging my parents to drive me to the library or riding my bicycle down a narrow road to get to the nearest magazine rack. Today, with so much information at our fingertips, the most interesting challenge is deciding what to study.

As we do every month, we have assembled a set of online tech talks that can fulfill this need for you. Our team has created talks that will provide you with information about the latest AWS services along with the best practices for putting them to use in your environment.

The talks are free, but they do fill up, so you should definitely register ahead of time if you would like to attend. Most of the talks are one hour in length; all times are in the Pacific (PT) time zone. Here’s what we have on tap for the rest of this month:

Monday, April 24
10:30 AM – Modernize Meetings with Amazon Chime.

1:00 PM – Essential Capabilities of an IoT Cloud Platform.

Tuesday, April 25
8:30 AM – Hands On Lab: Windows Workloads on AWS.

Noon – AWS Services Overview & Quarterly Update.

1:30 PM – Scaling to Million of Users in the Blink of an Eye with Amazon CloudFront: Are you Ready?

Wednesday, April 26
9:00 AM – IDC and AWS Joint Webinar: Getting the Most Bang for your Buck with #EC2 #Winning.

10:30 AM – From Monolith to Microservices – Containerized Microservices on AWS.

Noon – Accelerating Mobile Application Development and Delivery with AWS Mobile Hub.

Thursday, April 27
8:30 AM – Hands On Lab: Introduction to Microsoft SQL Server in AWS.

10:30 AM – Applying AWS Organizations to Complex Account Structures.

Noon – Deep Dive on Amazon Cloud Directory.

I will be presenting Tuesday’s service overview – hope to “see” you there.

Jeff;

AWS Price List API Update – Regional Price Lists

by Jeff Barr | on | in Announcements | | Comments

We launched the AWS Price List API in late 2015 (read New – AWS Price List API to learn more). Designed to power budgeting, forecasting, and cost analysis tools, this API provides prices for AWS services in JSON and CSV form, with one price list per service. You can download and process the price lists on an as-needed basis, and you can also elect to receive notification via Amazon Simple Notification Service (SNS) each time we make a price update.

Today we are making the AWS Price List API more useful by providing you with access to a separate price list for each AWS region. These lists are smaller and will download more quickly than the original, non-regionalized lists, which are still available.

To access the price lists, download the offer index:

https://pricing.us-east-1.amazonaws.com/offers/v1.0/aws/index.json.

It will contain one entry like this for each AWS service:

{
  "formatVersion" : "v1.0",
  "disclaimer" : "This pricing list is for informational purposes only. All prices are subject to the additional terms included in the pricing pages on http://aws.amazon.com. All Free Tier prices are also subject to the terms included at https://aws.amazon.com/free/",
  "publicationDate" : "2017-03-31T21:29:23Z",
  "offers" : {
    “{service code}" : {
      "offerCode" : "{service code}",
      "versionIndexUrl" : "/offers/v1.0/aws/{service code}/index.json",
      "currentVersionUrl" : "/offers/v1.0/aws/{service code}/current/index.json",
      "currentRegionIndexUrl" : "/offers/v1.0/aws/{service code}/current/region_index.json"
    }
  }
}

The currentRegionIndexUrl is relative to https://pricing.us-east-1.amazonaws.com. It points to a region index for the service. The region index contains one entry for each region where the service is available, indexed by region code (“ap-south-1”, “eu-west-2”, and so forth):

{
  "formatVersion" : "v1.0",
  "disclaimer" : "This pricing list is for informational purposes only. All prices are subject to the additional terms included in the pricing pages on http://aws.amazon.com. All Free Tier prices are also subject to the terms included at https://aws.amazon.com/free/",
  "publicationDate" : "2017-04-07T22:41:47Z",
  "regions" : {
    "ap-south-1" : {
      "regionCode" : "ap-south-1",
      "currentVersionUrl" : "/offers/v1.0/aws/AmazonEC2/20170407224147/ap-south-1/index.json"
    },
    "eu-west-2" : {
      "regionCode" : "eu-west-2",
      "currentVersionUrl" : "/offers/v1.0/aws/AmazonEC2/20170407224147/eu-west-2/index.json"
    }
}

The currentVersionUrl is also relative to https://pricing.us-east-1.amazonaws.com. Each URL points to a price list that is specific to one region and one service. The price list includes all of the SKUs that are available in the region, including data transfer in and out of the region. It also includes global SKUs that are related to the SKUs that are specific to the region.

Available Now
The new regional price lists are available now and you can start using them today at no charge. Take a look and let me know what you build!

Jeff;

 

Announcing 5 Partners That Have Achieved AWS Service Partner Status for AWS Service Catalog

by Ana Visneski | on | in AWS Marketplace | | Comments

Allison Johnson from the AWS Marketplace wrote the guest post below to share some important APN news.

-Ana


At last November’s re:Invent, we announced the AWS Service Delivery Program to help AWS customers find partners in the AWS Partner Network (APN) with expertise in specific AWS services and skills.  Today we are adding Management Tools as a new Partner Solution to the Service Delivery program, and AWS Service Catalog is the first product to launch in that category.  APN Service Catalog partners help create catalogs of IT services that are approved by the customer’s organization for use on AWS.  With AWS Service Catalog, customers and APN partners can centrally manage commonly deployed IT services to help achieve consistent governance and meet compliance requirements while enabling users to self-provision approved services.

We have an enormous APN partner ecosystem, with thousands of consulting partners, and this program simplifies the process of finding partners experienced in implementing Service Catalog.  The consulting partners we are launching this program with today are BizCloud Experts, Cloudticity, Flux7, Logicworks, and Wipro.

The process our partners go through to achieve the Service Catalog designation is not easy.  All of the partners must have publicly referenceable customers using Service Catalog, and there is a technical review to ensure that they understand Service Catalog almost as well as our own Solution Architects do!

One common theme from all of the partner’s technical applications was the requirement to help their customers meet HIPAA compliance objectives.  HIPAA requires three essential components: 1) establishment of processes, 2) enforcement of processes, and 3) separation of roles.  Service Catalog helps with all three.  Using AWS CloudFormation templates, Service Catalog Launch constraints, and identity and access management (IAM) based permission to Service Catalog portfolios, partners are able to establish and strictly enforce a process for infrastructure delivery for their customers.  Separation of roles is achieved by using Service Catalog’s launch constraints and IAM, and our partners were able to create separation of roles such that developers were agile but were only allowed to do what their policies permitted them to.

Another common theme was the use of Service Catalog for self-service discovery and launch of AWS services.  Customers can navigate to the Service Catalog to view the dashboard of products available to them, and they are empowered to launch their own resources.

Customers also use Service Catalog for standardization and central management.  The customer’s service catalog manager can manage resource updates and changes via the Service Catalog dashboard.  Tags can be standardized across instances launched from the Service Catalog.

Below are visual diagrams of Service Catalog workflows created for two of BizCloud Expert’s customers.

Ready to learn more?  If you are an AWS customer looking for a consulting partner with Service Catalog expertise, click here for more information about our launch partners.  If you are a consulting partner and would like to apply for membership, contact us.

-Allison Johnson

 

AWS San Francisco Summit – Summary of Launches and Announcements

by Jeff Barr | on | in Announcements | | Comments

Many of my colleagues are in San Francisco for today’s AWS Summit. Here’s a summary of what we announced from the main stage and in the breakout sessions:

New Services

Newly Available

New Features

Jeff;

 

Amazon Lex – Now Generally Available

by Jeff Barr | on | in Amazon Lex | | Comments

During AWS re:Invent I showed you how you could use Amazon Lex to build conversational voice & text interfaces. At that time we launched Amazon Lex in preview form and invited developers to sign up for access. Powered by the same deep learning technologies that drive Amazon Alexa, Amazon Lex allows you to build web & mobile applications that support engaging, lifelike interactions.

Today I am happy to announce that we are making Amazon Lex generally available, and that you can start using it today! Here are some of the features that we added during the preview:

Slack Integration – You can now create Amazon Lex bots that respond to messages and events sent to a Slack channel. Click on the Channels tab of your bot, select Slack, and fill in the form to get a callback URL for use with Slack:

Follow the tutorial (Integrating an Amazon Lex Bot with Slack) to see how to do this yourself.

Twilio Integration – You can now create Amazon Lex bots that respond to SMS messages sent to a Twilio SMS number. Again, you simply click on Channels, select Twilio, and fill in the form:

To learn more, read Integrating an Amazon Lex Bot with Twilio SMS.

SDK Support – You can now use the AWS SDKs to build iOS, Android, Java, JavaScript, Python, .Net, Ruby, PHP, Go, and C++ bots that span mobile, web, desktop, and IoT platforms and interact using either text or speech. The SDKs also support the build process for bots; you can programmatically add sample utterances, create slots, add slot values, and so forth. You can also manage the entire build, test, and deployment process programmatically.

Voice Input on Test Console – The Amazon Lex test console now supports voice input when used on the Chrome browser. Simply click on the microphone:

Utterance Monitoring – Amazon Lex now records utterances that were not recognized by your bot, otherwise known as missed utterances. You can review the list and add the relevant ones to your bot:

You can also watch the following CloudWatch metrics to get a better sense of how your users are interacting with your bot. Over time, as you add additional utterances and improve your bot in other ways, the metrics should be on the decline.

  • Text Missed Utterances (PostText)
  • Text Missed Utterances (PostContent)
  • Speech Missed Utterances

Easy Association of Slots with Utterances – You can now highlight text in the sample utterances in order to identify slots and add values to slot types:

Improved IAM Support – Amazon Lex permissions are now configured automatically from the console; you can now create bots without having to create your own policies.

Preview Response Cards – You can now view a preview of the response cards in the console:

To learn more, read about Using a Response Card.

Go For It
Pricing is based on the number of text and voice responses processed by your application; see the Amazon Lex Pricing page for more info.

I am really looking forward to seeing some awesome bots in action! Build something cool and let me know what you come up with.

Jeff;

 

Amazon Polly – Announcing Speech Marks and Whispering

by Tara Walker | on | in Amazon Polly, Launch | | Comments

Like me, you may have loved going to the library or bookstore to have your favorite book narrated to you. As a child, I loved listening to books narrated by good storytellers who gave life to their stories by changing the inflection of their voice as needed. The book narration coupled with the visual aids the storytellers used to tell the story, drove my love for reading and exploring new books.

In fact, in order for my parents to ensure that my love of reading extended to classic novels, they bought my sister and I, a small projector device with a tape recorder. This device would narrate the story and synchronize the projection of the visuals from the book by using a chime sound to signal when we should advance to the next screen. While I have unfortunately dated myself with that story, it is great for me to look back and consider how far we have come with speech technologies like Text-to-Speech (TTS). Even with all of these advancements, it is still challenging for developers to add synchronized speech/voice to the animations of characters or graphics in their games, videos, and digital books using TTS. Additionally, it is very rare to successfully use a TTS solution to emulate the pitch, tempo, and level of loudness of the speech in lifelike voices.
With this in mind, I am happy to announce Amazon Polly is launching support for Speech Marks and Whispering.

Amazon Polly is a deep learning service that enables you to turn text into lifelike speech. You can select a voice of your choice by taking advantage of the 47 lifelike voices included in the service and its support for 24 languages. Using Polly, you can send the text you want to convert into speech to the Polly API, and it will return an audio stream that you can play or store it in common audio file formats like MP3.

Speech Marks are metadata, which allows developers to synchronize speech with visual experiences. This feature enables scenarios like lip-syncing by synchronizing speech with facial animations or using the highlighting of written words as they are spoken. The speech marks metadata describes the synthesized speech, and by using it alongside the speech audio stream can determine the beginning and ending of sounds, words, sentences, and SSML tags. With the new Speech Marks, developers can now create lip-syncing avatars, visually highlighted read-along experiences, and integrate speech capabilities into the gaming engines like Amazon Lumberyard to give a voice to the characters.

There are four types of speech marks:

  • Sentence: Specifies a sentence element in the input text
  • Word: Indicates a word element in the input text
  • Viseme: Illustrates the position of the face and mouth corresponding to the sound that is spoken
  • Speech Synthesis Markup Language (SSML): Describes a <mark> element from the SSML input text.

Whispering is a speech effect similar to pitch, tempo, and loudness, in that it provides developers with yet one more expressive voice feature with which they can now modify the Text-to-Speech output. The whispering feature allows developers to have words from their input text spoken in a whispered voice using <amazon:effect name=”whispered”> SSML element.

Let’s take a quick look at both these new features.

 

Using Speech Marks

I’ll jump into an example of using speech marks with Amazon Polly in the AWS Console. I’ll go first to the Amazon Polly console and press the Get started button.

I’m taken to the Text-To-Speech menu option, and I select the SSML tab under the Text-to-Speech section. I will simply add two sentences that I wish to be spoken in the provided text field and then select a Voice.

I’ll verify the sentences are in the form that I wish them to be spoken by clicking the Listen to Speech button. Since I like what I hear, I will proceed with adding the speech marks metadata. In order to use speech marks, I will select the Change file format link.

When the Change file format dialog box comes up, I will select the File Format option, Speech Marks, and under the Speech Mark Types section, I will choose: Word and Sentence, by checking the checkboxes beside each speech mark type. Now I will click the Change button.


This returns me to the Text-To-Speech section of the console, and I can now click the Download Speech Marks button to see the generated speech marks.

The file downloaded has a .marks extension and contains JSON, and contains information about the start and end of each of my sentences and words. The JSON fields are:

  • Time: timestamp in milliseconds from the beginning of the audio stream
  • Type: type of speech mark (sentence, word, viseme, or ssml)
  • Start: offset in bytes from the start of the object in the input text (not including viseme marks)
  • End: offset in bytes of the object’s end in the input text (not including viseme marks)
  • Value – data that varies based on the type of speech mark, i.e. sentence speech mark contains the entire sentence in the text

 

Using Whispering

As I noted previously, using the Whispering feature allows me to have my input text be spoken in a whispered voice using the SSML amazon:effect element with a name attribute value of whispered. I’ll use my example above and insert SSML elements to have some of my text spoken using a using a whispered voice.

I’ll return to the Amazon Polly console and in the text box change my current text to use the new whispered voice feature for the sentence, “My name is Tara”. To accomplish this I will use the following SSML element: <amazon:effect name=”whispered”>. Therefore, the final sentence with SSML marks I entered into the text box looks as follows:

<speak>Hi!<amazon:effect name="whispered">My name is Tara.</amazon:effect>I am excited to talk about Polly's new features.</speak>

When I click the Listen to speech button, I will hear that the sentence, “My name is Tara” is indeed spoken in a whispered voice.

I want to download my speech output, so I will click the Change file format link. When the Change file format dialog box comes up, I will select the MP3 option under File format section then click the Change button.


Now I have the option to download my file by clicking the Download MP3 button.

You can hear my speech output using the new whispered voice by clicking here.

Summary

The Speech Marks and Whispering features are available in Amazon Polly starting today. To learn more about these and other features visit the Amazon Polly developer guide found here: http://docs.aws.amazon.com/polly/latest/dg

For more information about Amazon Polly, visit the Amazon Polly product page or get started by converting your text to speech in the Amazon Polly console.

You should give your text the gift of voice with Amazon Polly today.

Tara

Amazon Rekognition Update – Image Moderation

by Jeff Barr | on | in Amazon Rekognition | | Comments

We launched Amazon Rekognition late last year and I told you about it in my post Amazon Rekognition – Image Detection and Recognition Powered by Deep Learning. As I explained at the time, this service was built by our Computer Vision team over the course of many years and analyzes billions of images daily.

Today we are adding image moderation to Rekognition. If your web site or application allows users to upload profile photos or other imagery, you will love this new Rekognition feature.

Rekognition can now identify images that contain suggestive or explicit content that may not be appropriate for your site. The moderation labels provide detailed sub-categories, allowing you to fine-tune the filters that you use to determine what kinds of images you deem acceptable or objectionable. You can use this feature to improve photo sharing sites, forums, dating apps, content platforms for children, e-commerce platforms and marketplaces, and more.

To access this feature, call the DetectModerationLabels function from your code. The response will include a set of moderation labels drawn from a built-in taxonomy:

"ModerationLabels": [ 
  {
    "Confidence": 83.55088806152344, 
    "Name": "Suggestive",
    "ParentName": ""
   },
   {
    "Confidence": 83.55088806152344, 
    "Name": "Female Swimwear Or Underwear", 
    "ParentName": "Suggestive" 
   }
 ]

You can use the Image Moderation Demo in the AWS Management Console to experiment with this feature:

Image moderation is available now and you can start using it today!

Jeff;