Containers

Category: AWS Fargate

Infosys reimagines technology skill assessments with Wingspan using AWS Fargate

This post has been co-authored by Arpan Patro, Lead Architect at Infosys and Satheesh Kumar, Solutions Architect at AWS Infosys is a global leader in next-generation digital services and consulting. Infosys has a strong workforce of over 240K employees spread across the globe providing business consulting, information technology, and outsourcing services. Challenge: Infosys serves their clients […]

Read More

Introducing server-side encryption of ephemeral storage using AWS Fargate-managed keys in AWS Fargate platform version 1.4

This post was contributed by Yuling Zhou, Eduardo Lopez Biagi, and Paavan Mistry. Today, we introduced server-side encryption of ephemeral storage in AWS Fargate platform version 1.4. The ephemeral task storage is automatically encrypted with industry-standard AES-256 encryption algorithm using AWS Fargate-managed keys for the updated platform version. This feature requires no additional configuration from […]

Read More

Under the hood: AWS Fargate data plane

Today, we launched a new platform version (1.4) for AWS Fargate, which bundles a number of new features and capabilities for our customers. You can read more about these features in this blog post. One of the changes we are introducing in platform version 1.4 is replacing Docker Engine with Containerd as Fargate’s container execution […]

Read More

AWS Fargate platform versions primer

AWS Fargate is a managed service to run containers. This is an AWS managed service that allows users to launch containers without having to worry about the infrastructure underneath. In another blog post, we explored in detail the new features and the changes we introduced with AWS Fargate platform version 1.4.0. Let’s step back and […]

Read More

AWS Fargate launches platform version 1.4.0

AWS Fargate is a managed service to run containers. Fargate allows customers to use Amazon Elastic Container Service (ECS) and Amazon Elastic Kubernetes Service (EKS) to launch applications without the burden of having to deal with the undifferentiated heavy lifting of maintaining, patching, scaling, securing, life-cycling the infrastructure. While Amazon EC2 abstracts away hypervisors and […]

Read More

Enabling cross-account access to Amazon EKS cluster resources

Amazon Elastic Kubernetes Service (Amazon EKS) is a managed service that makes it easy for you to run Kubernetes on AWS without needing to stand up or maintain your own Kubernetes control plane. The recent launches of managed node groups and Amazon EKS on AWS Fargate removes the need to provision and manage infrastructure for pods. Kubernetes […]

Read More

Using EKS encryption provider support for defense-in-depth

Gyuho Lee, Rashmi Dwaraka, and Michael Hausenblas When we announced that we plan to natively support the AWS Encryption Provider in Amazon EKS, the feedback we got from you was pretty clear: can we have it yesterday? Now we’re launching EKS support for the encryption provider, a vital defense-in-depth security feature. That is, you can […]

Read More

The role of AWS Fargate in the container world

In 2017, we introduced a serverless service to run containers at scale called AWS Fargate. Today, customers are launching tens of millions of containers on it every week. Customers keep telling us that the reason they love Fargate is because it removes a lot of the infrastructure undifferentiated heavy lifting. For example, they no longer […]

Read More

Using ALB Ingress Controller with Amazon EKS on Fargate

In December 2019, we announced the ability to use Amazon Elastic Kubernetes Service to run Kubernetes pods on AWS Fargate. Fargate eliminates the need for you to create or manage EC2 instances for your Kubernetes applications. When your pods start, Fargate automatically allocates compute resources on-demand to run them. Fargate is great for running and […]

Read More

Autoscaling EKS on Fargate with custom metrics

This is a guest post by Stefan Prodan of Weaveworks. Autoscaling is an approach to automatically scale up or down workloads based on the resource usage. In Kubernetes, the Horizontal Pod Autoscaler (HPA) can scale pods based on observed CPU utilization and memory usage. Starting with Kubernetes 1.7, an aggregation layer was introduced that allows third-party […]

Read More