Containers

Tag: Amazon EKS

Using Amazon FSx for Windows File Server on EKS Windows Containers

Recently, we published a blog post on using Amazon FSx for Windows File Server as persistent storage for Windows containers on Amazon Elastic Container Service (ECS). Today, we are going to walk through a step-by-step process on how to do the same on Amazon Elastic Kubernetes Service (EKS). We will achieve this using an AWS […]

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Improved Amazon EKS console for cluster creation and management

We recently announced an updated Amazon EKS console experience to create clusters, management, and supporting documentation. In this blog post, we dive into the updates we have made and how they aim to help our customers and cluster administrators when creating clusters using the Amazon EKS console. 1. Multi-step cluster create flow EKS now includes […]

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Multi-tenant design considerations for Amazon EKS clusters

This post was contributed by Roberto Migli, AWS Solutions Architect.  Amazon Elastic Kubernetes Service (Amazon EKS) is used today by thousands of customers to run container applications at scale. One of the common questions that often we hear is: how do we provide a multi-tenant Amazon EKS cluster to our teams? Should I run one cluster, […]

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De-mystifying cluster networking for Amazon EKS worker nodes

Running Kubernetes on AWS requires an understanding of both AWS networking configuration and Kubernetes networking requirements. When you use the default Amazon Elastic Kubernetes Service (Amazon EKS) AWS CloudFormation templates to deploy your Amazon Virtual Private Cloud (Amazon VPC) and Amazon EC2 worker nodes, everything typically just works. But small issues in your configuration can result […]

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Access Logging Made Easy with AWS App Mesh and Fluent Bit

I’ve found that the term microservices can have different meanings and benefits depending on who you talk to. However, the one benefit where I’ve typically found consensus is that microservices allow your teams to have the freedom to choose the best tool for each job. Meaning, microservices architectures shouldn’t follow a “one size fits all” […]

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The role of AWS Fargate in the container world

In 2017, we introduced a serverless service to run containers at scale called AWS Fargate. Today, customers are launching tens of millions of containers on it every week. Customers keep telling us that the reason they love Fargate is because it removes a lot of the infrastructure undifferentiated heavy lifting. For example, they no longer […]

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API Gateway as an Ingress Controller for Amazon EKS

When teams deploy microservices on Amazon EKS, they usually expose a REST API for use in front ends and third-party applications. A best practice is to manage these APIs with an API Gateway. This provides a unique entry point for your APIs and also eliminates the need to implement API-specific code for things like security, […]

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App Mesh Integration with AWS ALB Ingress Controller

AWS App Mesh is a service mesh that provides application-level networking to make it easy for your services to communicate with each other across multiple types of compute infrastructure. App Mesh standardizes how your services communicate, giving you end-to-end visibility and ensuring high-availability for your applications. The AWS ALB Ingress controller is a controller that […]

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Game DevOps made easy with AWS Game-Server CD Pipeline

This is a guest post by Anita Buehrle of Weaveworks. The biggest challenge faced by game publishers is the ability to deliver new features to players as quickly as possible. Not only do new features have to arrive quickly and reliably, but they also need to be delivered in a way that optimizes costs and […]

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Using ALB Ingress Controller with Amazon EKS on Fargate

In December 2019, we announced the ability to use Amazon Elastic Kubernetes Service to run Kubernetes pods on AWS Fargate. Fargate eliminates the need for you to create or manage EC2 instances for your Kubernetes applications. When your pods start, Fargate automatically allocates compute resources on-demand to run them. Fargate is great for running and […]

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