AWS Database Blog

Tag: AWS DMS

Moving a replication task to a different replication instance in AWS DMS

We’re excited to announce a new feature of AWS Database Migration Service (AWS DMS) that allows you to move a replication task from one replication instance to another. With this feature, you can stop a running migration, move the task to an instance with a newer AWS DMS version or different instance type, and resume […]

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Setting up Amazon CloudWatch alarms for AWS DMS resources using the AWS CLI

For very large migrations, AWS Database Migration Service (AWS DMS) replication can run for hours or days depending on the data being replicated. It’s advisable to monitor the AWS DMS resources for a smooth migration. Monitoring your resources can help you detect anomalies and trigger notifications based on the threshold metrics configured. You can use […]

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Populating your graph in Amazon Neptune from a relational database using AWS Database Migration Service (DMS) – Part 4: Putting it all together

In this four-part series, we cover how to translate a relational data model to a graph data model using a small dataset containing airports and the air routes that connect them. Part one discussed the source data model and the motivation for moving to a graph model. Part two explored mapping our relational data model to a labeled property graph model. Part three covered the Resource Description Framework (RDF) data model. In this final post, we show how to use AWS DMS to copy data from our relational database to Neptune for both graph data models. You may wish to refer to the first three posts to review the source and target data models.

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Populating your graph in Amazon Neptune from a relational database using AWS Database Migration Service (DMS) – Part 3: Designing the RDF Model

In this four-part series, we cover how to translate a relational data model to a graph data model using a small dataset containing airports and the air routes that connect them. Part one discussed the source data model and the motivation for moving to a graph model. Part two covered designing the property graph model. In this post, we explore mapping our relational data model to a Resource Description Framework (RDF) model. You may wish to refer to parts one and two of the series to review the model. In part four, we show how to use AWS DMS to copy data from a relational database to Neptune for both graph data models.

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Populating your graph in Amazon Neptune from a relational database using AWS Database Migration Service (DMS) – Part 2: Designing the property graph model

In this four-part series, we cover how to translate a relational data model to a graph data model using a small dataset containing airports and the air routes that connect them. Part one discussed the source data model and the motivation for moving to a graph model. In this post, we explore mapping our relational data model to a labeled property graph model. You may wish to refer to part one of the series to review the source relational data model. Part three covers the Resource Description Framework (RDF) data model. In part four, we show how to use AWS DMS to copy data from a relational database to Neptune for both graph data models.

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Populating your graph in Amazon Neptune from a relational database using AWS Database Migration Service (DMS) – Part 1: Setting the stage

In this four-part series, we cover how to translate a relational data model to a graph data model using a small dataset containing airports and the air routes that connect them. Part one discusses the source data model and the motivation for moving to a graph model. We discuss this for the labeled property graph in part two and for the Resource Description Framework (RDF) data model in part three. In part four, we show how to use AWS DMS to copy data from a relational database to Neptune for both graph data models.

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Effectively migrating LOB data to Amazon S3 from Amazon RDS for Oracle with AWS DMS

In this post, I walk through an effective way to migrate and continuously replicate tables with LOB columns from Amazon RDS for Oracle to Amazon S3 using AWS Database Migration Service (AWS DMS). This service helps you migrate on-premises databases to AWS quickly and securely. In this post, we explore its heterogeneous replication feature.

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Cross-Region disaster recovery of Amazon RDS for SQL Server

Amazon RDS for SQL Server makes it easy to set up, operate, and scale SQL Server deployments in the Amazon Web Services (AWS) cloud environment. For your enterprise workloads, which depend on Amazon RDS for SQL Server, you need an effective disaster recovery (DR) strategy to help you stay up and running if an unexpected […]

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Achieving minimum downtime for major version upgrades in Amazon Aurora for PostgreSQL using AWS DMS

AWS provides two managed PostgreSQL options: Amazon RDS for PostgreSQL and Amazon Aurora PostgreSQL. When Amazon RDS or Aurora support a new major version of a database engine, for example, PostgreSQL 10 to 11, you can upgrade your DB instances to the new version. Major version upgrades can contain database changes that may not be […]

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Configuring SSL encryption on Oracle and PostgreSQL endpoints in AWS DMS

AWS Database Migration Service (DMS) helps you migrate databases to AWS securely. It supports homogeneous and heterogeneous migrations between different database platforms, such as Oracle to Amazon Aurora. AWS DMS supports continuous data replication while maintaining high availability and has been widely adopted for database migrations because it is easy to configure. For more information, […]

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