Category: Announcements


Move Over JSON – Policy Summaries Make Understanding IAM Policies Easier

by Joy Chatterjee | on | in Announcements, How-to guides | | Comments

Today, we added policy summaries to the IAM console, making it easier for you to understand the permissions in your AWS Identity and Access Management (IAM) policies. Instead of reading JSON policy documents, you can scan a table that summarizes services, actions, resources, and conditions for each policy. You can find this summary on the policy detail page or the Permissions tab on an individual IAM user’s page.

In this blog post, I introduce policy summaries and review the details of a policy summary. (more…)

In Case You Missed These: AWS Security Blog Posts from January, February, and March

by Craig Liebendorfer | on | in Announcements, Best Practices, Compliance, Encryption, How-to guides, Security | | Comments

Image of lock and key

In case you missed any AWS Security Blog posts published so far in 2017, they are summarized and linked to below. The posts are shown in reverse chronological order (most recent first), and the subject matter ranges from protecting dynamic web applications against DDoS attacks to monitoring AWS account configuration changes and API calls to Amazon EC2 security groups.

March

March 22: How to Help Protect Dynamic Web Applications Against DDoS Attacks by Using Amazon CloudFront and Amazon Route 53
Using a content delivery network (CDN) such as Amazon CloudFront to cache and serve static text and images or downloadable objects such as media files and documents is a common strategy to improve webpage load times, reduce network bandwidth costs, lessen the load on web servers, and mitigate distributed denial of service (DDoS) attacks. AWS WAF is a web application firewall that can be deployed on CloudFront to help protect your application against DDoS attacks by giving you control over which traffic to allow or block by defining security rules. When users access your application, the Domain Name System (DNS) translates human-readable domain names (for example, www.example.com) to machine-readable IP addresses (for example, 192.0.2.44). A DNS service, such as Amazon Route 53, can effectively connect users’ requests to a CloudFront distribution that proxies requests for dynamic content to the infrastructure hosting your application’s endpoints. In this blog post, I show you how to deploy CloudFront with AWS WAF and Route 53 to help protect dynamic web applications (with dynamic content such as a response to user input) against DDoS attacks. The steps shown in this post are key to implementing the overall approach described in AWS Best Practices for DDoS Resiliency and enable the built-in, managed DDoS protection service, AWS Shield.

March 21: New AWS Encryption SDK for Python Simplifies Multiple Master Key Encryption
The AWS Cryptography team is happy to announce a Python implementation of the AWS Encryption SDK. This new SDK helps manage data keys for you, and it simplifies the process of encrypting data under multiple master keys. As a result, this new SDK allows you to focus on the code that drives your business forward. It also provides a framework you can easily extend to ensure that you have a cryptographic library that is configured to match and enforce your standards. The SDK also includes ready-to-use examples. If you are a Java developer, you can refer to this blog post to see specific Java examples for the SDK. In this blog post, I show you how you can use the AWS Encryption SDK to simplify the process of encrypting data and how to protect your encryption keys in ways that help improve application availability by not tying you to a single region or key management solution. (more…)

Join Us for AWS IAM Day on Thursday, March 23, in San Francisco

by Craig Liebendorfer | on | in Announcements | | Comments

AWS IAM Day image

Join us in San Francisco for AWS IAM Day on Thursday, March 23, from 9:30 A.M.–4:15 P.M. At this free technical event, we will introduce you to AWS Identity and Access Management (IAM) concepts using easy-to-follow examples, and tools and strategies you can use for controlling access to your AWS environment. We will also cover how to integrate Active Directory with AWS workloads and how to enable your federated users to authenticate into AWS by using your organization’s identity provider. You can attend one session or stay for the full day.

Learn more and register!

– Craig

How to Access the AWS Management Console Using AWS Microsoft AD and Your On-Premises Credentials

by Vijay Sharma | on | in Announcements, Federation, How-to guides | | Comments

AWS Directory Service for Microsoft Active Directory, also known as AWS Microsoft AD, is a managed Microsoft Active Directory (AD) hosted in the AWS Cloud. Now, AWS Microsoft AD makes it easy for you to give your users permission to manage AWS resources by using on-premises AD administrative tools. With AWS Microsoft AD, you can grant your on-premises users permissions to resources such as the AWS Management Console instead of adding AWS Identity and Access Management (IAM) user accounts or configuring AD Federation Services (AD FS) with Security Assertion Markup Language (SAML).

In this blog post, I show how to use AWS Microsoft AD to enable your on-premises AD users to sign in to the AWS Management Console with their on-premises AD user credentials to access and manage AWS resources through IAM roles. (more…)

Now Generally Available – AWS Organizations: Policy-Based Management for Multiple AWS Accounts

by Caitlyn Shim | on | in Announcements | | Comments

AWS Organizations service image

Over the years, we have found that many of our customers are managing multiple AWS accounts. Instead of dealing with a multitude of per-team, per-division, or per-application accounts, our customers have asked for a way to define access control policies that can be easily applied to all, some, or individual accounts. In many cases, these customers are also interested in additional billing and cost management options, and would like to be able to take advantage of AWS pricing benefits such as volume discounts and Reserved Instances.

Today, AWS Organizations moves from Preview to General Availability. You can use Organizations to centrally manage multiple AWS accounts, with the ability to create a hierarchy of organizational units (OUs). You can assign each account to an OU, define policies, and then apply those policies to an entire hierarchy, specific OUs, or specific accounts. You can invite existing AWS accounts to join your organization and you can also create new accounts. All of these functions are available from the AWS Management Console, the AWS Command Line Interface (CLI), and through the AWS Organizations API.

To read the full AWS Blog post about today’s launch, see AWS Organizations – Policy-Based Management for Multiple AWS Accounts.

– Caitlyn

s2n Is Now Handling 100 Percent of SSL Traffic for Amazon S3

by Stephen Schmidt | on | in Announcements, Encryption, Security | | Comments

s2n logo

In June 2015, we introduced s2n, an open-source implementation of the TLS encryption protocol, making the source code publicly available under the terms of the Apache Software License 2.0 from the s2n GitHub repository. One of the key benefits to s2n is far less code surface, with approximately 6,000 lines of code (compared to OpenSSL’s approximately 500,000 lines). In less than two years, we’ve seen significant enhancements to s2n, with more than 1,000 code commits, plus the addition of fuzz testing and a static analysis tool, tis-interpreter.

Today, we’ve achieved another important milestone for securing customer data: we have replaced OpenSSL with s2n for all internal and external SSL traffic in Amazon Simple Storage Service (Amazon S3) commercial regions. This was implemented with minimal impact to customers, and multiple means of error checking were used to ensure a smooth transition, including client integration tests, catching potential interoperability conflicts, and identifying memory leaks through fuzz testing.

It was only last week that AWS CEO Andy Jassy reiterated something that’s been a continual theme for us here at AWS: “There’s so much security built into cloud computing platforms today, for us, it’s our No. 1 priority—it’s not even close, relative to anything else.” Yes, security remains our top priority, and our commitment to making formal verification of automated reasoning more efficient exemplifies the way we think about our tools and services. Making encryption more developer friendly is critical to what can be a complicated architectural universe. To help make security more robust and precise, we put mechanisms in place to verify every change, including negative test cases that “verify the verifier” by deliberately introducing an error into a test-only build and confirming that the tools reject it.

If you are interested in using or contributing to s2n, the source code, documentation, commits, and enhancements are all publicly available under the terms of the Apache Software License 2.0 from the s2n GitHub repository.

– Steve

Easily Replace or Attach an IAM Role to an Existing EC2 Instance by Using the EC2 Console

by Sankaran Mariappan | on | in Announcements, How-to guides, Security | | Comments

AWS Identity and Access Management (IAM) roles enable your applications running on Amazon EC2 to use temporary security credentials. IAM roles for EC2 make it easier for your applications to make API requests securely from an instance because they do not require you to manage AWS security credentials that the applications use. Recently, we enabled you to use temporary security credentials for your applications by attaching an IAM role to an existing EC2 instance by using the AWS CLI and SDK. To learn more, see New! Attach an AWS IAM Role to an Existing Amazon EC2 Instance by Using the AWS CLI.

Starting today, you can attach an IAM role to an existing EC2 instance from the EC2 console. You can also use the EC2 console to replace an IAM role attached to an existing instance. In this blog post, I will show how to attach an IAM role to an existing EC2 instance from the EC2 console. (more…)

How to Easily Log On to AWS Services by Using Your On-Premises Active Directory

by Ron Cully | on | in Announcements, How-to guides | | Comments

AWS Directory Service for Microsoft Active Directory (Enterprise Edition), also known as Microsoft AD, now enables your users to log on with just their on-premises Active Directory (AD) user name—no domain name is required. This new domainless logon feature makes it easier to set up connections to your on-premises AD for use with applications such as Amazon WorkSpaces and Amazon QuickSight, and it keeps the user logon experience free from network naming. This new interforest trusts capability is now available when using Microsoft AD with Amazon WorkSpaces and Amazon QuickSight Enterprise Edition.

In this blog post, I explain how Microsoft AD domainless logon works with AD interforest trusts, and I show an example of setting up Amazon WorkSpaces to use this capability.

To follow along, you must have already implemented an on-premises AD infrastructure. You will also need to have an AWS account with an Amazon Virtual Private Cloud (Amazon VPC). I start with some basic concepts to explain domainless logon. If you have prior knowledge of AD domain names, NetBIOS names, logon names, and AD trusts, you can skip the following “Concepts” section and move ahead to the “Interforest Trust with Domainless Logon” section. (more…)

New! Attach an AWS IAM Role to an Existing Amazon EC2 Instance by Using the AWS CLI

by Apurv Awasthi | on | in Announcements, How-to guides, Security | | Comments

AWS Identity and Access Management (IAM) roles enable your applications running on Amazon EC2 to use temporary security credentials that AWS creates, distributes, and rotates automatically. Using temporary credentials is an IAM best practice because you do not need to maintain long-term keys on your instance. Using IAM roles for EC2 also eliminates the need to use long-term AWS access keys that you have to manage manually or programmatically. Starting today, you can enable your applications to use temporary security credentials provided by AWS by attaching an IAM role to an existing EC2 instance. You can also replace the IAM role attached to an existing EC2 instance.

In this blog post, I show how you can attach an IAM role to an existing EC2 instance by using the AWS CLI. (more…)

Now Available: Amazon Cloud Directory—A Cloud-Native Directory for Hierarchical Data

by Mahendra Chheda | on | in Announcements | | Comments

Cloud Directory image

 

Today we are launching Amazon Cloud Directory. This service is purpose-built for storing large amounts of strongly typed hierarchical data. With the ability to scale to hundreds of millions of objects while remaining cost-effective, Cloud Directory is a great fit for all sorts of cloud and mobile applications.

Cloud Directory is a building block that already powers other AWS services including Amazon Cognito, AWS Organizations, and Amazon QuickSight Standard Edition. Because it plays such a crucial role within AWS, Cloud Directory was designed with scalability, high availability, and security in mind (data is encrypted at rest and while in transit).

Cloud Directory is a managed service: you don’t need to think about installing or patching software, managing servers, or scaling any storage or compute infrastructure. You simply define the schemas, create a directory, and then populate your directory by making calls to the Cloud Directory API. This API is designed for speed and scale, with efficient, batch-based read and write functions.

To learn more about Cloud Directory, see the full blog post on the AWS Blog.

– Mahendra