Containers

Tag: Amazon ECS

ECS auto scaling using custom metrics

Amazon Elastic Container Service (ECS) Auto Scaling using custom metrics

Introduction Amazon ECS eliminates the need to install, operate, and scale your own cluster management infrastructure. Customers are using horizontal scalability to deploy and scale their microservices applications running on Amazon ECS. They use the Application Auto Scaling service to automatically scale based on metrics data. Amazon ECS typically measures service utilization based on average […]

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Diagram-1

Metrics and traces collection from Amazon ECS using AWS Distro for OpenTelemetry with dynamic service discovery

An earlier blog published last year (Part 1 in the series), Metrics collection from Amazon ECS using Amazon Managed Service for Prometheus, demonstrated how to deploy Prometheus server on an Amazon ECS cluster, dynamically discover the services to collect metrics from, and send metrics to Amazon Managed Service for Prometheus for subsequent query and visualization. […]

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Under the hood: Amazon Elastic Container Service and AWS Fargate increase task launch rates

Since 2015, hundreds of thousands of developers have chosen Amazon Elastic Container Service (Amazon ECS) as their orchestration service for cluster management. Developers trust Amazon ECS with the lifecycle of their mission-critical applications, from initial deployment to rolling out new versions of their code and autoscaling in response to changing traffic levels. Alongside these long-lived application tasks, Amazon […]

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Figure 1. Capacity provider strategy controls tasks placement

Optimize cost for container workloads with ECS capacity providers and EC2 Spot Instances

Amazon EC2 Spot Instances use spare Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud  (Amazon EC2) capacity at up to a 90% discount compared to On-Demand prices. Amazon EC2 can interrupt Spot Instances with a two-minute notification when EC2 needs the capacity back. Spot Instances are an ideal option for applications that are stateless, fault-tolerant, scalable, and flexible, such as big data, […]

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Diagram of of the QMaaS data processing pipeline

Athenahealth QMaaS: Optimizing throughput and costs with Amazon ECS & EC2 Spot

Karthik Kalkur, Senior Architect, Athenahealth, Jayaprakash Alawala, Specialist Solution Architect (Containers), AWS, and Sridhar Bharadwaj, Sr EC2 Spot Specialist, AWS This guest blog post is contributed by Karthik Kalkur, a Senior Architect at athenahealth, in partnership with AWS Specialist Solution Architect for Containers, Jayaprakash Alawala, and AWS Sr. EC2 Spot Specialist, Sridhar Bharadwaj. Athenahealth is […]

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Three things to consider when implementing Mutual TLS with AWS App Mesh

Mutual Transport Layer Security (mTLS) is an extension of TLS, where both the client and server leverage X.509 digital certificates to authenticate each other before starting communications. Both parties present certificates to each other and validate the other’s certificate. The key difference from any usual TLS communication is that when using mutual TLS, each client must […]

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Using a CI/CD Pipeline to Inject an Envoy Proxy Sidecar Container into an Amazon ECS Task

AWS App Mesh is a service mesh that provides application-level networking to make it easy for your services to communicate with each other across multiple types of compute infrastructure. App Mesh includes support for Amazon Elastic Container Service (Amazon ECS) and Amazon Elastic Kubernetes Service (Amazon EKS), requiring the open-source Envoy proxy to be run […]

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Getting started with Consul service mesh on Amazon ECS

We recently announced the general availability of Amazon Elastic Container Service (Amazon ECS) service extension for Consul service mesh in AWS Cloud Development Kit (AWS CDK). This is a new integration that makes it easier for customers to use Consul as a service mesh on Amazon ECS. In this blog post, we show you how […]

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Creating custom Amazon Machine Images with the ECS-optimized AMI Build Recipes

Customers running their container workloads on Amazon Elastic Container Service (Amazon ECS) have a choice of AWS Fargate and also using Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2) instances with the Amazon ECS-optimized AMI. One of the requests (issue #176) that our customers submitted, was to allow them to create their own ECS Amazon Machine Image (AMI). Today […]

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Rolling EC2 AMI updates with capacity providers in Amazon ECS

When deploying containers to Amazon Elastic Container Service (Amazon ECS), customers have choices as to what level of management they want or need to have over the cluster compute. First there is AWS Fargate, which is a serverless compute engine that removes the need for customers to provision and manage servers. This approach simplifies the […]

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