AWS Database Blog

Introduction to Amazon DynamoDB for Cassandra developers

This blog post introduces Amazon DynamoDB to Cassandra developers and helps you get started with DynamoDB by showing some basic operations in Cassandra, and using AWS CLI to perform the same operations in DynamoDB. Amazon DynamoDB is a fully managed, multiregion, multimaster NoSQL database that provides consistent single-digit millisecond latency at any scale. It offers […]

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Migrating your on-premises SQL Server Windows workloads to Amazon EC2 Linux

For decades, IT administrators could only run their SQL Server workloads on Windows. However, as of SQL Server 2017, SQL Server is now available to run in the Linux operating system. For IT administrators, this represents an opportunity to run SQL Server workloads on their preferred operating system, save on Windows Server licensing costs, and […]

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Amazon Neptune releases Streams, SPARQL federated query for graphs and more

The latest Amazon Neptune release brings together a host of capabilities that enhance developer productivity with graphs. This post summarizes the key features we have rolled out and pointers for more details. Getting started This new engine release will not be automatically applied to your existing cluster. You can choose to upgrade an existing cluster […]

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Learn to build NoSQL database-driven applications using Amazon DynamoDB with new edX course

Modern organizations are constantly looking for ways to get more value from their data, making it increasingly important for teams and individuals to understand how to build database-driven applications in the AWS Cloud. As the data landscape continues to evolve to include more cloud-based databases, an increasing number of developers are choosing non-relational databases that are […]

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Implementing priority queueing with Amazon DynamoDB

Queuing is a commonly used solution for separating computation components in a distributed processing system. It is a form of the asynchronous communication system used in serverless and microservices architectures. Messages wait in a queue for processing, and leave the queue when received by a single consumer. This type of messaging pattern is known as […]

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Your guide to Amazon DynamoDB sessions, workshops, and chalk talks at AWS re:Invent 2019

Last updated: December 3, 2019 AWS re:Invent 2019 is almost here! This post includes a complete list of Amazon DynamoDB sessions, workshops, and chalk talks at AWS re:Invent 2019. Use the information on this page to help schedule your conference week in Las Vegas this year. If you still haven’t registered for re:Invent and need some […]

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Amazon RDS now supports detailed backup storage billing

Recently, AWS announced the general availability of the Amazon RDS detailed backup storage billing feature. This feature applies to PostgreSQL, MySQL, MariaDB, Oracle, and SQL Server database engines. Before the release of this feature, Amazon RDS backup charges were presented as a single-line item per Region on the monthly bill. However, it was hard to […]

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Sending notifications from Amazon Aurora PostgreSQL

Enterprise customers execute many day-to-day batch jobs on Amazon Aurora PostgreSQL databases, and need notification methods such as email or text after completing such jobs to keep track of their activity. Because Aurora PostgreSQL is a managed service, it restricts access to database extensions such as pgsmtp and pgplpythonu for security reasons. This raises the […]

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Choosing the right number of shards for your large-scale Amazon DynamoDB table

As a general design best practice, you can optimize your use of Amazon DynamoDB throughput capacity by designing your application for uniform read and write activity across all logical partition keys in the table and its indexes. In doing so, you can prevent creating hot partitions that could consume a disproportionate amount of your table’s […]

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Caching for performance with Amazon DocumentDB and Amazon ElastiCache

In tech, caching is ubiquitous. CPUs use L1, L2, and L3 caches, and mobile phones cache app data locally. Streaming services cache content on the edge, browsers cache images, and more. The same is true for databases. Imagine if, on a gaming site, every time a leaderboard was displayed, a query had to do a […]

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