AWS HPC Blog

Category: Amazon EC2

Coming soon: dedicated HPC instances and hybrid functionality

This year, we’ve launched a lot of new capabilities for HPC customers, making AWS the best place for the length and breadth of their workflows. EFA went mainstream and is now available in sixteen instance families for fast fabric capabilities for scaling MPI and NCCL codes. We’ve written deep-dive studies to explore and explain the optimizations that will drive your workloads faster in the cloud than elsewhere. We released a major new version of AWS ParallelCluster with its own API for controlling the cluster lifecycle. AWS Batch became deeply integrated into AWS Step Functions and now supports fair-share scheduling, with multiple levers to control the experience. Today we’re signaling the arrival of a new HPC-dedicated instance family – the Hpc6a – and an enhanced EnginFrame that will bring the best of the cloud and on-premises together in a single interface.

Read More

EFA is now mainstream, and that’s a Good Thing

We have recently launched three new Amazon EC2 instances types enabled with Elastic Fabric Adapter (EFA), our network interface for Amazon EC2 instances that enables customers to run applications requiring high levels of inter-node communications at scale on AWS. These bring our EFA-enabled count to sixteen different instance families covering a wide range of use cases. EFA is going mainstream and we are just getting started.

Read More
Figure 1: High level architecture of the file system.

Scaling a read-intensive, low-latency file system to 10M+ IOPs

Many shared file systems are used in supporting read-intensive applications, like financial backtesting. These applications typically exploit copies of datasets whose authoritative copy resides somewhere else. For small datasets, in-memory databases and caching techniques can yield impressive results. However, low latency flash-based scalable shared file systems can provide both massive IOPs and bandwidth. They’re also easy to adopt because of their use of a file-level abstraction. In this post, I’ll share how to easily create and scale a shared, distributed POSIX compatible file system that performs at local NVMe speeds for files opened read-only.

Read More
Figure 4: Relative price-to-performance ratio ($USD/ns) while scaling the simulation across single and multi-GPU instances and comparing to CPU (EFA enabled) performance-to-price (baseline CPU perf).

Running GROMACS on GPU instances: multi-node price-performance

This three-part series of posts cover the price performance characteristics of running GROMACS on Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (Amazon EC2) GPU instances. Part 1 covered some background no GROMACS and how it utilizes GPUs for acceleration. Part 2 covered the price performance of GROMACS on a particular GPU instance family running on a single instance. […]

Read More
Figure 4: Performance scaling as a function of CPU core count increase while number of GPU's remain constant.

Running GROMACS on GPU instances: single-node price-performance

This three-part series of posts cover the price performance characteristics of running GROMACS on Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (Amazon EC2) GPU instances. Part 1 covered some background no GROMACS and how it utilizes GPUs for acceleration. This post (Part 2) covers the price performance of GROMACS on a particular GPU instance family running on a […]

Read More
Figure 2: Work distribution across CPU and GPU for a single simulation timestep

Running GROMACS on GPU instances

Comparing the performance of real applications across different Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (Amazon EC2) instance types is the best way we’ve found for finding optimal configurations for HPC applications here at AWS. Previously, we wrote about price-performance optimizations for GROMACS that showed how the GROMACS molecular dynamics simulation runs on single instances, and how it […]

Read More

Cost-optimization on Spot Instances using checkpoint for Ansys LS-DYNA

A major portion of the costs incurred for running Finite Element Analyses (FEA) workloads on AWS comes from the usage of Amazon EC2 instances. Amazon EC2 Spot Instances offer a cost-effective architectural choice, allowing you to take advantage of unused EC2 capacity for up to a 90% discount compared to On-Demand Instance prices. In this post, we describe how you 0can run fault-tolerant FEA workloads on Spot Instances using Ansys LS-DYNA’s checkpointing and auto-restart utility.

Read More

Bare metal performance with the AWS Nitro System

High Performance Computing (HPC) is known as a domain where applications are well-optimized to get the highest performance possible on a platform. Unsurprisingly, a common question when moving a workload to AWS is what performance difference there may be from an existing on-premises “bare metal” platform. This blog will show the performance differential between “bare metal” instances and instances that use the AWS Nitro hypervisor is negligible for the evaluated HPC workloads.

Read More
GROMACS price-performance optimizations header image

GROMACS price-performance optimizations on AWS

Molecular dynamics (MD) is a simulation method for analyzing the movement and tracing trajectories of atoms and molecules where the dynamics of a system evolve over time. MD simulations are used across various domains such as material sciences, biochemistry, biophysics and are typically used in two broad ways to study a system. The importance of […]

Read More

Running finite element analysis using Simcenter Nastran on AWS

This post was written by Dnyanesh Digraskar, Sr. Partner Solutions Architect for HPC at AWS and co-authored by Wei Zhang and Ravi Gupta, Sr Software Engineers for Simcenter Nastran at Siemens. Introduction In this blog, we demonstrate the deployment, performance, and price comparisons of Simcenter Nastran for three finite element analysis (FEA) based use cases […]

Read More