AWS for Industries

Genomics Webinar: Improving the diagnosis of infectious diseases with microbial genomic analysis

The discovery of microbial cell-free DNA has propelled the introduction of new technologies that can be leveraged for next-generation diagnostic assays. Previously inaccessible genomic information can now be comprehensively surveyed for microorganisms, all from a single blood draw.

This webinar will outline how infectious disease testing firm Karius analyzes microbial cell-free DNA data through novel computational methods optimized for cloud scalability on AWS.

Sivan Bercovici of Karius will share how his team addresses the challenge of accuracy of genomic reference data, as well as the complexities that arise from the convoluted and highly homologous microbial signal. This capability offers the promise to fill gaps in current diagnostic methods, to empower physicians to more effectively detect and diagnose infectious disease, and to monitor the effectiveness of treatment.

REGISTER FOR WEBINAR

Thursday December 5, 2019

1:00 – 2:00 pm EST

Available for on-demand viewing after live date using same link

Featured Speaker:

Sivan Bercovici is the chief technology officer at Karius, where he leads computational and data efforts aimed at unlocking the clinical value in microbiome data. Throughout his career, Sivan has developed novel machine-learning methods and analytical platforms that address broad challenges in genetics and the study of human disease. Prior to Karius, Sivan was a co-founder and chief technology officer at Lifecode. He obtained his PhD in Computer Science from Technion-Israel Institute of Technology and completed his postdoctoral research at Stanford University’s Artificial Intelligence Laboratory.

 

 

 

 

 

Learn more about AWS for Genomics

 

Kelli Jonakin, Ph.D.

Kelli Jonakin, Ph.D.

Kelli Jonakin is the Principal Marketing Manager for the Life Sciences and Genomics Industry verticals at AWS. She comes with a background in pharmaceutical research, with a special focus on development and commercialization of biologics. Kelli received her Ph.D. in Pharmacology and Systems Biology from the University of Colorado, and received an NIH post-doctoral fellowship grant to study Biochemistry at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.