AWS Public Sector Blog

Tag: AWS Batch

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Tracking global antimicrobial resistance among pathogens using Nextflow and AWS

The Centre for Genomic Pathogen Surveillance (CGPS) is based at the Wellcome Genome Campus, Cambridge and The Big Data Institute, University of Oxford in the United Kingdom. Much of its work involves collaborating with laboratories around the world to enhance genomic surveillance by using big data, engineering, training, and genomic capacity building. Ultimately, the Centre hopes to enable the linking and real-time interpretation of data globally to track pathogens and antimicrobial resistance at an affordable rate. Typically, spikes in cost for research are a common challenge for laboratories. With the cloud, the team wanted to mitigate their costs, and particularly those of their partners in low and middle-income countries, by exploring the Amazon Web Services (AWS) Cloud’s pay-as-you-go infrastructure.

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Embracing the cloud for climate research

Scientists at NC State University’s North Carolina Institute for Climate Studies (NCICS) work with large datasets and complex computational analysis. Traditionally, they did their work using on-premises computational resources. As different projects were stretching the limits of those systems, NCICS decided to explore cloud computing. As part of the Amazon Sustainability Data Initiative, we invited Jessica Mathews, Jared Rennie, and Tom Maycock to share what they learned from using AWS for climate research. As they considered exploring the cloud to support their work, the idea of leaving the comfort of the local environment was a bit scary. And they had questions: How much will it cost? What does it take to deploy processing to the cloud? Will it be faster? Will the results match what they were getting with their own systems? Here is their story and what they learned.

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Drug Discovery and Biomarkers Development on the Human Gut Microbiome Using AWS Batch and Nextflow

Gut microbiome plays a critical role in building our immune system at birth. It provides a life-long personal and natural protection. To fully explore and characterize the role of the human gut microbiome, Enterome uses different approaches, including the latest genome sequencing technologies, to reconstruct microbial genomes and quantify the abundance of different species and microbial genes in the gut across large cohorts of patients. The current high throughput sequencing technologies produce tens of millions of DNA sequences for each biological sample and the human gut microbiome is estimated to contain hundreds of species and several million unique bacterial genes that can be identified and analyzed. Enterome’s mission is to translate all of this information into actual knowledge, which can be applied to advanced clinical and drug discovery programs.

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