AWS Security Blog

Category: AWS CloudHSM

Solution overview: migrate keys

How to migrate symmetric exportable keys from AWS CloudHSM Classic to AWS CloudHSM

In August 2017, we announced the “new” AWS CloudHSM service, which had a lot of improvements over AWS CloudHSM Classic (for clarity in this post I will refer to the services as New CloudHSM and CloudHSM Classic). These advantages in security, scalability, usability, and economy, included FIPS 140-2 Level 3 certification, fully managed high availability […]

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How to deploy CloudHSM to securely share your keys with your SaaS provider

August 6, 2019: We’ve made an update to clarify use cases for VPC peering. If your organization is using software as a service (SaaS), your data is likely stored and protected by the SaaS provider. However, depending on the type of data that your organization stores and the compliance requirements that it must meet, you […]

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How to migrate a digital signing workload to AWS CloudHSM

Note from July 18, 2019: We added information about AWS Certificate Manager (ACM) Private Certificate Authority (CA) to the introduction. Is your on-premises Hardware Security Module (HSM) at end-of-life? Does continued maintenance of your on-premises hardware take a lot of time and cost a lot of money? You should consider migrating your workloads to AWS […]

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How to BYOK (bring your own key) to AWS KMS for less than $15.00 a year using AWS CloudHSM

Note: BYOK is helpful for certain use cases, but I recommend that you familiarize yourself with KMS best practices before you adopt this approach. You can review best practices in the AWS Key Management Services Best Practices (.pdf) whitepaper. May 14, 2019: We’ve updated a sentence to clarify that this solution does not include instructions […]

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How to migrate your EC2 Oracle Transparent Data Encryption (TDE) database encryption wallet to CloudHSM

In this post, I’ll show you how to migrate an encryption wallet for an Oracle database installed on Amazon EC2 from using an outside HSM to using AWS CloudHSM. Transparent Data Encryption (TDE) for Oracle is a common use case for Hardware Security Module (HSM) devices like AWS CloudHSM. Oracle TDE uses what is called […]

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Architecture diagram

How to run AWS CloudHSM workloads on Docker containers

AWS CloudHSM is a cloud-based hardware security module (HSM) that enables you to generate and use your own encryption keys on the AWS Cloud. With CloudHSM, you can manage your own encryption keys using FIPS 140-2 Level 3 validated HSMs. Your HSMs are part of a CloudHSM cluster. CloudHSM automatically manages synchronization, high availability, and […]

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AWS re:Invent Security Recap: Launches, Enhancements, and Takeaways

For more from Steve, follow him on Twitter Customers continue to tell me that our AWS re:Invent conference is a winner. It’s a place where they can learn, meet their peers, and rediscover the art of the possible. Of course, there is always an air of anticipation around what new AWS service releases will be […]

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Are KMS custom key stores right for you?

You can use the AWS Key Management Service (KMS) custom key store feature to gain more control over your KMS keys. The KMS custom key store integrates KMS with AWS CloudHSM to help satisfy compliance obligations that would otherwise require the use of on-premises hardware security modules (HSMs) while providing the AWS service integrations of […]

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How to clone an AWS CloudHSM cluster across regions

You can use AWS CloudHSM to generate, store, import, export, and manage your cryptographic keys. It also permits hash functions to compute message digests and hash-based message authentication codes (HMACs), as well as cryptographically sign data and verify signatures. To help ensure redundancy of data and simplification of the disaster recovery process, you’ll typically clone […]

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Using AWS CloudHSM-backed certificates with Microsoft Internet Information Server

SSL/TLS certificates are used to create encrypted sessions to endpoints such as web servers. If you want to get an SSL certificate, you usually start by creating a private key and a corresponding certificate signing request (CSR). You then send the CSR to a certificate authority (CA) and receive a certificate. When a user seeks […]

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