Amazon RDS is a managed relational database service that provides you six familiar database engines to choose from, including Amazon AuroraMySQL, MariaDB, Oracle, Microsoft SQL Server, and PostgreSQL. This means that the code, applications, and tools you already use today with your existing databases can be used with Amazon RDS. Amazon RDS handles routine database tasks such as provisioning, patching, backup, recovery, failure detection, and repair.

Amazon RDS makes it easy to use replication to enhance availability and reliability for production workloads. Using the Multi-AZ deployment option, you can run mission-critical workloads with high availability and built-in automated fail-over from your primary database to a synchronously replicated secondary database. Using Read Replicas, Amazon RDS for MySQL, PostgreSQL, and Amazon Aurora also enable you to scale out beyond the capacity of a single database deployment for read-heavy database workloads.

As with all Amazon Web Services, there are no up-front investments required, and you pay only for the resources you use.

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AWS Free Tier includes 750hrs of Micro DB Instance each month for one year, 20GB of Storage, and 20GB for Backups with Amazon Relational Database Service (RDS).

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Some features listed here are particular to certain Amazon RDS database engines. See the detail page for each engine to learn about its specifics.

Amazon Aurora | MySQL | MariaDBOracle | SQL Server | PostgreSQL

You can use the AWS Management Console, the Amazon RDS Command Line Interface, or simple API calls to access the capabilities of a production-ready relational database in minutes.

Amazon RDS database instances are pre-configured with parameters and settings appropriate for the engine and class you have selected. You can launch a database instance and connect your application within minutes. DB Parameter Groups provide granular control and fine-tuning of your database.

Amazon RDS provides Amazon CloudWatch metrics for your database instances at no additional charge. You can use the AWS Management Console to view key operational metrics, including compute/memory/storage capacity utilization, I/O activity, and instance connections.

Amazon RDS will make sure that the relational database software powering your deployment stays up-to-date with the latest patches. You can exert optional control over when and if your database instance is patched. Learn more »

Amazon RDS General Purpose Storage is an SSD-backed storage option delivers a consistent baseline of 3 IOPS per provisioned GB and provides the ability to burst up to 3,000 IOPS. This storage type is suitable for a broad range of database workloads. Learn more »

Amazon RDS Provisioned IOPS Storage is an SSD-backed storage option designed to deliver fast, predictable, and consistent I/O performance. You specify an IOPS rate when creating a database instance, and Amazon RDS provisions that IOPS rate for the lifetime of the database instance. This storage type is optimized for I/O-intensive transactional (OLTP) database workloads. You can provision up to 30,000 IOPS per database instance, although your actual realized IOPS may vary based on your database workload, instance type, and database engine choice. Learn more »

You can scale the compute and memory resources powering your deployment up or down, up to a maximum of 32 vCPUs and 244 GiB of RAM. Compute scaling operations typically complete in a few minutes.

As your storage requirements grow, you can also provision additional storage. The Amazon Aurora engine will automatically grow the size of your database volume as your database storage needs grow, up to a maximum of 64 TB or a maximum you define. The MySQL, Oracle, and PostgreSQL engines allow you to provision additional storage on-the-fly with zero downtime.

The MySQL, Oracle, and PostgreSQL engines also allow you to scale the throughput of your database instance: with General Purpose (SSD) storage, up to a maximum of 3000 IOPS by provisioning more storage; and with Provisioned IOPS (SSD) storage, up to a maximum of 30,000 IOPS by increasing the amount of IOPS provisioned. Learn more »

Turned on by default, the automated backup feature of Amazon RDS enables point-in-time recovery for your database instance. Amazon RDS will backup your database and transaction logs and store both for a user-specified retention period. This allows you to restore your database instance to any second during your retention period, up to the last five minutes. Your automatic backup retention period can be configured to up to thirty-five days.

Database snapshots are user-initiated backups of your instance stored in Amazon S3 that are kept until you explicitly delete them. You can create a new instance from a database snapshots whenever you desire. Although database snapshots serve operationally as full backups, you are billed only for incremental storage use.

Amazon RDS Multi-AZ deployments provide enhanced availability and durability for database instances, making them a natural fit for production database workloads. When you provision a Multi-AZ database instance, Amazon RDS synchronously replicates your data to a standby instance in a different Availability Zone (AZ). Learn more »

Amazon RDS will automatically replace the compute instance powering your deployment in the event of a hardware failure.

Amazon RDS allows you to encrypt your databases using keys you manage through AWS Key Management Service (KMS). On a database instance running with Amazon RDS encryption, data stored at rest in the underlying storage is encrypted, as are its automated backups, read replicas, and snapshots.

Amazon RDS supports Transparent Data Encryption in SQL Server and Oracle. Transparent Data Encryption in Oracle is integrated with AWS CloudHSM, which allows you to securely generate, store, and manage your cryptographic keys in single-tenant Hardware Security Module (HSM) appliances within the AWS cloud.

Amazon RDS supports the use of SSL to secure data in transit.

AWS recommends that you run your database instances in Amazon VPC, which allows you isolate your database in your own virtual network and connect to your on-premises IT infrastructure using industry-standard encrypted IPsec VPNs. You can configure firewall settings and control network access to your database instances.

Amazon RDS is integrated with AWS Identity and Access Management (IAM) and provides you the ability to control the actions that your AWS IAM users and groups can take on specific Amazon RDS resources, from database instances through snapshots, parameter groups, and option groups. You can also tag your Amazon RDS resources and control the actions that your IAM users and groups can take on groups of resources that have the same tag and associated value. For example, you can configure your IAM rules to ensure developers are able to modify "Development" database instances, but only Database Administrators can make changes to "Production" database instances. Learn more »

Amazon RDS for Aurora provides Amazon CloudWatch metrics for your database instances at no additional charge. You can use the AWS Management Console to view over 40 key operational metrics for your database instances, including compute, memory, storage, query throughput, cache hit ratio, and active connections.

Amazon RDS will keep your database up-to-date with the latest patches. You can exert optional control over when and if your instance is patched.

Amazon RDS can notify you via email or SMS text message of database events through Amazon SNS. You can use the AWS Management Console or the Amazon RDS APIs to subscribe to over 40 different database events associated with your  database instances.

There is no up-front commitment with Amazon RDS; you simply pay a monthly charge for each database instance that you launch. And, when you’re finished with a database instance, you can easily delete it. To see more details, visit the Amazon RDS Pricing page.

Amazon RDS currently supports the following database instance classes. See supported instance class tables for the Amazon Aurora, MySQL, Oracle, SQL Server, and PostgreSQL database engines.

Instance Type vCPU Memory (GiB) PIOPS-Optimized
Network Performance
Standard - Latest Generation
db.m4.large 2
db.m4.xlarge 4
Yes Yes
db.m4.2xlarge 8
Yes High
db.m4.4xlarge 16
Yes High
db.m4.10xlarge 40
Yes 10 Gigabit
Standard - Previous Generation
db.m3.medium 1 3.75 - Moderate
db.m3.large 2 7.5 - Moderate
db.m3.xlarge 4 15 Yes Moderate
db.m3.2xlarge 8 30 Yes High
Memory Optimized - Current Generation
db.r3.large 2 15 - Moderate
db.r3.xlarge 4 30.5 Yes Moderate
db.r3.2xlarge 8 61 Yes High
db.r3.4xlarge 16 122 Yes High
db.r3.8xlarge 32 244 -
10 Gigabit
Micro instances        
db.t2.micro 1 1 - Low
db.t2.small 1 2 - Low
db.t2.medium 2 4 - Moderate
db.t2.large 2 8 - Moderate

Looking for T1, M1, M2, or CR1 DB Instances? See the Previous Generation Instances page.