AWS News Blog

New for Amazon Simple Queue Service – FIFO Queues with Exactly-Once Processing & Deduplication

As the very first member of the AWS family of services, Amazon Simple Queue Service (SQS) has certainly withstood the test of time!  Back in 2004, we described it as a “reliable, highly scalable hosted queue for buffering messages between distributed application components.” Over the years, we have added many features including a dead letter queue, 256 KB payloads, SNS integration, long polling, batch operations, a delay queue, timers, CloudWatch metrics, and message attributes.

New FIFO Queues
Today we are making SQS even more powerful and flexible with support for FIFO (first-in, first-out) queues. We are rolling out this new type of queue in two regions now, and plan to make it available in many others in early 2017.

These queues are designed to guarantee that messages are processed exactly once, in the order that they are sent, and without duplicates. We expect that FIFO queues will be of particular value to our financial services and e-commerce customers,  and to those who use messages to update database tables. Many of these customers have systems that depend on receiving messages in the order that they were sent.

FIFO ordering means that, if you send message A, wait for a successful response, and then send message B, message B will be enqueued after message A, and then delivered accordingly. This ordering does not apply if you make multiple SendMessage calls in parallel. It does apply to the individual messages within a call to SendMessageBatch, and across multiple consecutive calls to SendMessageBatch.

Exactly-once processing applies to both single-consumer and multiple-consumer scenarios. If you use FIFO queues in a multiple-consumer environment, you can configure your queue to make messages visible to other consumers only after the current message has been deleted or the visibility timeout expires. In this scenario, at most one consumer will actively process messages; the other consumers will be waiting until the first consumer finishes or fails.

Duplicate messages can sometimes occur when a networking issue outside of SQS prevents the message sender from learning the status of an action and causes the sender to retry the call. FIFO queues use multiple strategies to detect and eliminate duplicate messages. In addition to content-based deduplication, you can include a MessageDeduplicationId when you call SendMessage for a FIFO queue. The ID can be up to 128 characters long, and, if present, takes higher precedence than content-based deduplication.

When you call SendMessage for a FIFO queue, you can now include a MessageGroupId. Messages that belong to the same group (as indicated by the ID) are processed in order, allowing you to create and process multiple, ordered streams within a single queue and to use multiple consumers while keeping data from multiple groups distinct and ordered.

You can create standard queues (the original queue type) or the new FIFO queues using the CreateQueue function, the create-queue command, or the AWS Management Console. The same API functions apply to both types of queues, but you cannot convert one queue type into the other.

Although the same API calls apply to both queue types, the newest AWS SDKs and SQS clients provide some additional functionality. This includes automatic, idempotent retries of failed ReceiveMessage calls.

Individual FIFO queues can handle up to 300 send, receive, or delete requests per second.

Some SQS Resources
Here are some resources to help you to learn more about SQS and the new FIFO queues:

If you’re coming to Las Vegas for AWS re:Invent and would like to hear more about how AWS customer Capital One is making use of SQS and FIFO queues, register and plan to attend ENT-217, Migrating Enterprise Messaging to the Cloud on Wednesday, November 30 at 3:30 PM.

Available Now
FIFO queues are available now in the US East (Ohio) and US West (Oregon) regions and you can start using them today. If you are running in US East (Northern Virginia) and want to give them a try, you can create them in US East (Ohio) and take advantage of the low-cost, low-latency connectivity between the regions.

As part of today’s launch, we are also reducing the price for standard queues by 20%. For the updated pricing, take a look at the SQS Pricing page.

Jeff;