AWS Architecture Blog

Tag: serverless architectures

Building a Serverless FHIR Interface on AWS

This post is courtesy of Mithun Mallick, Senior Solutions Architect (Messaging), and Navneet Srivastava, Senior Solutions Architect. Technology is revolutionizing the healthcare industry but it can be a challenge for healthcare providers to take full advantage because of software systems that don’t easily communicate with each other. A single patient visit involves multiple systems such […]

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Things to Consider When You Build a GraphQL API with AWS AppSync

Co-authored by George Mao When building a serverless API layer in AWS (one that provides a custom grammar for your serverless resources), your choices include Amazon API Gateway (REST) and AWS AppSync (GraphQL). We’ve discussed the differences between REST and GraphQL in our first post of this series and explored REST APIs in our second […]

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Things to Consider When You Build REST APIs with Amazon API Gateway

A few weeks ago, we kicked off this series with a discussion on REST vs GraphQL APIs. This post will dive deeper into the things an API architect or developer should consider when building REST APIs with Amazon API Gateway. Request Rate (a.k.a. “TPS”) Request rate is the first thing you should consider when designing REST APIs. […]

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Ten Things Serverless Architects Should Know

Building on the first three parts of the AWS Lambda scaling and best practices series where you learned how to design serverless apps for massive scale, AWS Lambda’s different invocation models, and best practices for developing with AWS Lambda, we now invite you to take your serverless knowledge to the next level by reviewing the […]

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Serverless Architectures with AWS Lambda: Overview and Best Practices

For some organizations, the idea of “going serverless” can be daunting. But with an understanding of best practices – and the right tools — many serverless applications can be fully functional with only a few lines of code and little else. Examples of fully-serverless-application use cases include: Web or mobile backends – Create fully-serverless, mobile […]

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