AWS Database Blog

Category: Amazon RDS

Amazon RDS for SQL Server reduces prices on Enterprise Edition in the Multi-AZ configuration

We’re pleased to announce that Amazon Relational Database Service (RDS) for SQL Server is reducing the price for both the On-Demand and Reserved DB Instances prices on Enterprise Edition Multi-AZ. The On-Demand prices have been reduced by an average by 25% across the latest generation of instance classes, which include the M5, R5, T3, X1, X1e, and Z1d. The Enterprise Edition Multi-AZ On-Demand price reduction is retroactive to July 1, 2020. The impacted Enterprise Edition Multi-AZ Reserved DB Instances purchased after August 1, 2020 will have the updated prices.

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Cross-Region disaster recovery of Amazon RDS for SQL Server

Amazon RDS for SQL Server makes it easy to set up, operate, and scale SQL Server deployments in the Amazon Web Services (AWS) cloud environment. For your enterprise workloads, which depend on Amazon RDS for SQL Server, you need an effective disaster recovery (DR) strategy to help you stay up and running if an unexpected […]

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Best practices for upgrading Amazon RDS for Oracle DB instances from 11.2.0.4 to 19c

Amazon Relational Database Service (Amazon RDS) for Oracle provides newer versions of databases so you can keep your DB instances up-to-date. These versions can include bug fixes, security enhancements, and other improvements. When Amazon RDS for Oracle supports a new version, you can choose how and when to upgrade your DB instances. As you may […]

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Customizing security parameters on Amazon RDS for SQL Server

You can now use database (DB) parameters to configure security protocols and ciphers on Amazon RDS for SQL Server. You can configure various security protocols and ciphers available for your RDS SQL Server instance. You can also choose to enable or disable certain TLS versions or ciphers, such as RC4 stream cipher, based on your […]

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Setting up passwordless login from Amazon EC2 Windows and Linux instances to Amazon RDS Oracle database instances

In today’s world, every organization uses a centralized location to store and manage user credentials. The most commonly used service for this is Microsoft Active Directory (AD). Organizations use LDAP protocol to authenticate users to their peripheral devices, but fewer companies use this centralized credential store to allow users to log in to their databases. […]

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Understanding autovacuum in Amazon RDS for PostgreSQL environments

PostgreSQL has become the preferred open-source relational database for many enterprise developers and startups, and powers leading business and mobile applications. Amazon Web Services (AWS) offers Amazon Relational Database Service (Amazon RDS) and Amazon Aurora as fully managed relational database services. Amazon RDS for PostgreSQL makes it easy to set up, operate, and scale PostgreSQL […]

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Managing inactive Amazon Aurora PostgreSQL users

Data is one of the most precious assets for any organization, and keeping data secure is always the top priority. One common security requirement for databases is to restrict user access—if a database user is compromised, it can cause significant damage to your data. You should follow the least privilege model for database users. This […]

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Managed disaster recovery and managed reader farm with Amazon RDS for Oracle using Oracle Active Data Guard

Many AWS users are taking advantage of the managed database offerings in the Amazon Relational Database Service (Amazon RDS) portfolio to remove much of the undifferentiated heavy lifting from their day-to-day activities. With Amazon RDS for Oracle, users can significantly reduce the administrative overhead of managing and maintaining an Oracle database. Amazon RDS for Oracle […]

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Scheduling and running Amazon RDS jobs with AWS Batch and Amazon CloudWatch rules

Database administrators and developers traditionally schedule scripts to run against databases using the system cron on the host where the database is running. As a managed database service, Amazon Relational Database Service (RDS) does not provide access to the underlying infrastructure, so if you migrate such workloads from on premises, you must move these jobs. […]

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