AWS Database Blog

Category: Elasticsearch

Get Started with Amazon Elasticsearch Service: Set CloudWatch Alarms on Key Metrics

Welcome to this introductory series on Elasticsearch and Amazon Elasticsearch Service (Amazon ES). In this and future articles, we provide the basic information that you need to get started with Elasticsearch on AWS. While supporting the many thousands of Amazon Elasticsearch Service (Amazon ES) domains for our customers, our team has amassed significant experience with […]

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Viewing Amazon Elasticsearch Service Slow Logs

Today, Amazon Elasticsearch Service (Amazon ES) announced support for publishing slow logs to Amazon CloudWatch Logs. This new feature enables you to publish Elasticsearch slow logs from your indexing and search operations and gain insights into the performance of those operations. You can enable slow logs to identify whether a performance issue on your cluster […]

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Get Started with Amazon Elasticsearch Service: Filter Aggregations in Kibana

Welcome to this introductory series on Elasticsearch and Amazon Elasticsearch Service (Amazon ES). In this and future articles, we provide the basic information that you need to get started with Elasticsearch on AWS. You figured out how cool Elasticsearch is, and now you’re sending your Apache web logs to Amazon Elasticsearch Service. You pop open […]

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Use Amazon S3 to Store a Single Amazon Elasticsearch Service Index

As detailed in our documentation, you can use the Elasticsearch API actions in Amazon Elasticsearch Service to take manual snapshots of your domain. You can easily back up your entire domain this way. However, did you know you can also snapshot and restore a single index, or multiple indexes? This blog post walks you through […]

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Serverless Scaling for Ingesting, Aggregating, and Visualizing Apache Logs with Amazon Kinesis Firehose, AWS Lambda, and Amazon Elasticsearch Service

Pubali Sen and Shankar Ramachandran are solutions architects at Amazon Web Services. In 2016, AWS introduced the EKK stack (Amazon Elasticsearch Service, Amazon Kinesis, and Kibana, an open source plugin from Elastic) as an alternative to ELK (Amazon Elasticsearch Service, the open source tool Logstash, and Kibana) for ingesting and visualizing Apache logs. One of the […]

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Send Apache Web Logs to Amazon Elasticsearch Service with Kinesis Firehose

We have many customers who own and operate Elasticsearch, Logstash, and Kibana (ELK) stacks to load and visualize Apache web logs, among other log types. Amazon Elasticsearch Service provides Elasticsearch and Kibana in the AWS Cloud in a way that’s easy to set up and operate. Amazon Kinesis Firehose provides reliable, serverless delivery of Apache […]

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Secure your Elasticsearch Development Domain using Amazon WorkSpaces

Darin Briskman (@briskmad) is a technical evangelist at Amazon Web Services. So you’re working with Amazon Elasticsearch Service and you’re setting up a non-production domain, using it for a development, sandbox, test, or staging environment. (If you’re new to Elasticsearch, a domain is similar to what’s called a cluster for other computing systems. It’s a […]

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EK Is the New ELK: Simplify Log Analytics by Transforming Data Natively in Amazon Elasticsearch Service

James Huang is an enterprise solutions architect at Amazon Web Services. AWS recently announced support for Elasticsearch 5.1. The announcement mentioned a few important improvements in the open source software and in Amazon Elasticsearch Service (Amazon ES), the managed service.  Elasticsearch 5.1 includes three important changes: a new scripting language called Painless, significant improvements to […]

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Get Started with Amazon Elasticsearch Service: How Many Shards Do I Need?

Welcome to this introductory series on Elasticsearch and Amazon Elasticsearch Service (Amazon ES). In this and future articles, we provide the basic information that you need to get started with Elasticsearch on AWS. How many shards? Elasticsearch can take in large amounts of data, split it into smaller units, called shards, and distribute those shards […]

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Set Access Control for Amazon Elasticsearch Service

Securing your Amazon Elasticsearch Service (Amazon ES) domain helps ensure your data cannot be accessed or altered by unauthorized users. Most customers want the security of IP address- or identity-based access policies, but choose open access out of convenience. Because a domain with open access will accept requests to create, view, modify, and delete data […]

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