AWS DevOps Blog

Deploying applications at FINRA using AWS CodeDeploy

by Geethalaksmi Ramachandran (FINRA – Director, Application Engineering), Avinash Chukka (FINRA – Senior Application Engineer)

At FINRA, a financial regulatory organization that oversees the broker-dealer industry with market intelligence, we have been utilizing the AWS CodeDeploy services to deploy applications on the cloud as well as on on-premises production servers. This blog post provides insight into our operations and experience with CodeDeploy.

Migration overview

Since 2014, we have gone through a systematic effort to migrate over 100 applications from on-premises resources to the AWS Cloud for everything from case management to data ingestion and processing. The applications comprise multiple components or microservices as individually deployable units or a single monolith application with multiple shared components.

Most of the application components, running on Linux and Windows, were entirely redesigned, containerized, and gradually deployed from on-premises to cloud-based Amazon ECS clusters. Fifteen applications were to be deferred for migration or planned for retirement due to other dependencies. Those deferred applications are currently running on on-premises bare-metal servers hosted across 38 Windows servers and 15 Linux servers per environment with a total of 150 Windows servers and 60 Linux servers across all the environments.

The applications were deployed to the on-premises servers earlier using the XL Deploy tool from XebiaLabs. The tool has now been decommissioned and replaced by CodeDeploy to attain more reliability and consistency in deployments across various applications.

Infrastructure and Workflow overview

FINRA’s AWS Cloud infrastructure consists of Amazon EC2 instances, ECS, Amazon EMR clusters, and many resources from other AWS services. We host web applications in ECS clusters, running approximately 200 clusters on each environment and EC2 instances. The infrastructure uses AWS CloudFormation and AWS Java SDK as Infrastructure-as-Code (IaC).

The CI/CD pipeline comprises of:

  • A source stage (per branch) stored in a BitBucket repository
  • A build stage executed on Jenkins build slaves
  • A deploy stage involving deployment from:
    • AWS CloudFormation and SDK to ECS clusters
    • CodeDeploy to EC2 instances
    • CodeDeploy Service to on-premises servers across various development, quality assurance (QA), staging, and production environments.

Jenkins masters running on EC2 instances within an Auto Scaling group orchestrate the CI/CD pipeline. The master spawns the build slaves as ECS tasks to execute a build job. Once the image is built and containerized in the build stage, the build artifact is stored in Artifactory repos for shared common libraries or staged in S3 to be used in deployments. The Jenkins slave invokes the appropriate deployment service – AWS CloudFormation and SDK or CodeDeploy depending on the target server environment, as detailed in the preceding paragraphs. On completion of the deployment, the automated smoke tests are launched.

The following diagram depicts the CD workflow for the on-premises instances:

The Delivery pipeline deploys across various environments such as development, QA, user acceptance testing (UAT), and production. Approval gates control deployments to UAT and production.

CodeDeploy Operations

Our experience of utilizing CodeDeploy services has been “very smooth” since we moved from the XebiaLabs XL Deploy tool three months ago. The main factors that led FINRA to select CodeDeploy for our organization were:

  • Being able to use the same set of deployment tools between on-premises and cloud-based instances
  • Easy portability and reuse of scripts
  • Shared community knowledge rather than isolated expertise

The default deployment parameters were well-suited for our environments and didn’t require altering values or customization. Depending on the application being deployed, deployments can be carried out on cloud-based instances or on-premises instances. Cloud-based instances use AWS CloudFormation templates to trigger CodeDeploy; on-premises instances use AWS CLI-based scripts to trigger CodeDeploy.

The cloud-based deployments in production follow “blue-green” strategy for some of the applications, in which rollback is a critical requirement for minimal disruption. Other applications in cloud follow the “rolling updates” method, where as the on-premises servers in production are upgraded using “in-place” deployment method. The CodeDeploy agents running on on-premises servers are configured with roles to query for required artifacts stored on specific S3 buckets when deploying the package.

The applications’ deployment mappings to the instances are configured based on EC2 Auto Scaling groups in the cloud and based on tags for on-premises resources. Each component is logically mapped to a CodeDeploy deployment group. However, at one point, the maximum number of tags added to the CodeDeploy on-premises instance was restricted to a maximum tag limit of 10, but the instance needed 13 tags corresponding to 13 deployment groups.

We overcame this limitation by adding a common tenth tag on the on-premises instance and also on the remaining deployment groups (10-13) and stored the mapping of instances to deployment groups externally. The deployment script first looks up the mapping and proceeds with the deployment by validating if it matches the target server name, then runs deployments only on the matching target servers and skips deployments on the unmatched servers, as shown in the following diagram.

CodeDeploy offers the following benefits to FINRA:

  • Deployment configurations written as code: CodeDeploy configuration uses CloudFormation templates as Infrastructure-as-Code, which makes it easier to create and maintain.
  • Version controlled deployment code: AWS CloudFormation templates, deployment configuration, and deployment scripts are maintained in the source code repository and version-controlled.
  • Reusability: Most CodeDeploy resource provisioning code is reusable across all the on-premises instances and on different platforms, such as Linux (RHEL) and Windows.
  • Zero maintenance of deployment tool: As a managed service, CodeDeploy does not require maintenance and upgrade.
  • Secrets Management: CodeDeploy integrates with central secrets management systems, and externalizes environment configurations.

Monitoring

FINRA uses the in-house developed DevOps Dashboard to monitor the build and deploy stages, based upon a Grafana UI extracting CI and CD data from Jenkins.

The cloud instances and on-premises servers are configured with agents to stream the real-time logs to a central Splunk Server, where the logs are analyzed and health-monitored. Optionally, the deployment logs are forwarded to the functional owners via email attachments. These logs become critical for the troubleshooting activity in post-mortems of past events. Due to the restrictions on accessing the base instances across various functional teams, the above mechanism enables us to gain visibility into health of the CI/CD infrastructure.

Looking Forward

We plan to migrate the remaining on-premises applications to the cloud after necessary refactoring and retiring of the application dependencies over the next few years.

Our eventual goal is to move towards serverless technologies to eliminate server infrastructure management.

Conclusion

This post reviewed the Infrastructure at FINRA on both AWS Cloud and on-premises, the CI/CD pipeline, and the CodeDeploy workflow integration, as well as examining insights into CodeDeploy use.

The content and opinions in this blog are those of the third-party author and AWS is not responsible for the content or accuracy of this post.