Category: How-to guides


How to Enable Multi-Factor Authentication for AWS Services by Using AWS Microsoft AD and On-Premises Credentials

by Peter Pereira | on | in How-to guides | | Comments

You can now enable multi-factor authentication (MFA) for users of AWS services such as Amazon WorkSpaces and Amazon QuickSight and their on-premises credentials by using your AWS Directory Service for Microsoft Active Directory (Enterprise Edition) directory, also known as AWS Microsoft AD. MFA adds an extra layer of protection to a user name and password (the first “factor”) by requiring users to enter an authentication code (the second factor), which has been provided by your virtual or hardware MFA solution. These factors together provide additional security by preventing access to AWS services, unless users supply a valid MFA code.

To enable MFA for AWS services such as Amazon WorkSpaces and QuickSight, a key requirement is an MFA solution that is a Remote Authentication Dial-In User Service (RADIUS) server or a plugin to a RADIUS server already implemented in your on-premises infrastructure. RADIUS is an industry-standard client/server protocol that provides authentication, authorization, and accounting management to enable users to connect network services. The RADIUS server connects to your on-premises AD to authenticate and authorize users. For the purposes of this blog post, I will use “RADIUS/MFA” to refer to your on-premises RADIUS and MFA authentication solution.

In this blog post, I show how to enable MFA for your Amazon WorkSpaces users in two steps: 1) Configure your RADIUS/MFA server to accept Microsoft AD requests, and 2) configure your Microsoft AD directory to enable MFA. (more…)

How to Create an Organizational Chart with Separate Hierarchies by Using Amazon Cloud Directory

by Srikanth Mandadi | on | in How-to guides | | Comments

Amazon Cloud Directory enables you to create directories for a variety of use cases, such as organizational charts, course catalogs, and device registries. Cloud Directory offers you the flexibility to create directories with hierarchies that span multiple dimensions. For example, you can create an organizational chart that you can navigate through separate hierarchies for reporting structure, location, and cost center.

In this blog post, I show how to use Cloud Directory APIs to create an organizational chart with two separate hierarchies in a single directory. I also show how to navigate the hierarchies and retrieve data. I use the Java SDK for all the sample code in this post, but you can use other language SDKs or the AWS CLI.

Define a schema

The first step in using Cloud Directory is to define a schema, which describes the data that will be stored in the directory that you will create later in this post. In this example, I define the schema by providing a JSON document. The schema has two facets: Employee and Group. I constrain the attributes within these facets by using various rules provided by Cloud Directory. For example, I specify that the Name attribute is of type STRING and must have a minimum length of 3 characters and maximum length of 100 characters. Similarly, I specify that the Status attribute is of type STRING and the value of this attribute must have one of the following three values: ACTIVE, INACTIVE, or TERMINATED. Having Cloud Directory handle these constraints means that I do not need to handle the validation of these constraints in my code, and it also lets multiple applications share the data in my directory without violating these constraints. (more…)

How to Easily Log On to AWS Services by Using Your On-Premises Active Directory

by Ron Cully | on | in Announcements, How-to guides | | Comments

AWS Directory Service for Microsoft Active Directory (Enterprise Edition), also known as Microsoft AD, now enables your users to log on with just their on-premises Active Directory (AD) user name—no domain name is required. This new domainless logon feature makes it easier to set up connections to your on-premises AD for use with applications such as Amazon WorkSpaces and Amazon QuickSight, and it keeps the user logon experience free from network naming. This new interforest trusts capability is now available when using Microsoft AD with Amazon WorkSpaces and Amazon QuickSight Enterprise Edition.

In this blog post, I explain how Microsoft AD domainless logon works with AD interforest trusts, and I show an example of setting up Amazon WorkSpaces to use this capability.

To follow along, you must have already implemented an on-premises AD infrastructure. You will also need to have an AWS account with an Amazon Virtual Private Cloud (Amazon VPC). I start with some basic concepts to explain domainless logon. If you have prior knowledge of AD domain names, NetBIOS names, logon names, and AD trusts, you can skip the following “Concepts” section and move ahead to the “Interforest Trust with Domainless Logon” section. (more…)

New! Attach an AWS IAM Role to an Existing Amazon EC2 Instance by Using the AWS CLI

by Apurv Awasthi | on | in Announcements, How-to guides, Security | | Comments

AWS Identity and Access Management (IAM) roles enable your applications running on Amazon EC2 to use temporary security credentials that AWS creates, distributes, and rotates automatically. Using temporary credentials is an IAM best practice because you do not need to maintain long-term keys on your instance. Using IAM roles for EC2 also eliminates the need to use long-term AWS access keys that you have to manage manually or programmatically. Starting today, you can enable your applications to use temporary security credentials provided by AWS by attaching an IAM role to an existing EC2 instance. You can also replace the IAM role attached to an existing EC2 instance.

In this blog post, I show how you can attach an IAM role to an existing EC2 instance by using the AWS CLI. (more…)

How to Remediate Amazon Inspector Security Findings Automatically

by Eric Fitzgerald | on | in How-to guides, Security | | Comments

The Amazon Inspector security assessment service can evaluate the operating environments and applications you have deployed on AWS for common and emerging security vulnerabilities automatically. As an AWS-built service, Amazon Inspector is designed to exchange data and interact with other core AWS services not only to identify potential security findings, but also to automate addressing those findings.

Previous related blog posts showed how you can deliver Amazon Inspector security findings automatically to third-party ticketing systems and automate the installation of the Amazon Inspector agent on new Amazon EC2 instances. In this post, I show how you can automatically remediate findings generated by Amazon Inspector. To get started, you must first run an assessment and publish any security findings to an Amazon Simple Notification Service (SNS) topic. Then, you create an AWS Lambda function that is triggered by those notifications. Finally, the Lambda function examines the findings, and then implements the appropriate remediation based on the type of issue.

Use case

In this post’s example, I find a common vulnerability and exposure (CVE) for a missing update and use Lambda to call the Amazon EC2 Systems Manager to update the instance. However, this is just one use case and the underlying logic can be used for multiple cases such as software and application patching, kernel version updates, security permissions and roles changes, and configuration changes. (more…)

How to Simplify Security Assessment Setup Using Amazon EC2 Systems Manager and Amazon Inspector

by Eric Fitzgerald | on | in How-to guides, Security | | Comments

In a July 2016 AWS Blog post, I discussed how to integrate Amazon Inspector with third-party ticketing systems by using Amazon Simple Notification Service (SNS) and AWS Lambda.

This AWS Security Blog post continues in the same vein, describing how to use Amazon Inspector to automate various aspects of security management. In this post, I show you how to install the Amazon Inspector agent automatically through the Amazon EC2 Systems Manager when a new Amazon EC2 instance is launched. In a subsequent post, I will show you how to update EC2 instances automatically that run Linux when Amazon Inspector discovers a missing security patch.

An overview of EC2 Systems Manager and EC2 Simple Systems Manager (SSM)

Amazon EC2 Systems Manager is a set of services that makes it easy to manage your Windows or Linux hosts running on EC2 instances. EC2 Systems Manager does this through an agent called EC2 Simple Systems Manager (SSM), which is installed on your instances. With SSM on your EC2 instances, you can save yourself an SSH or RDP session to the instance to perform management tasks.

With EC2 Systems Manager, you can perform various tasks at scale through a simple API, CLI, or EC2 Run Command. The EC2 Run Command can execute a Unix shell script on Linux instances or a Windows PowerShell script on Windows instances. When you use EC2 Systems Manager to run a script on an EC2 instance, the output is piped to a text file in Amazon S3 for you automatically. Therefore, you can examine the output without visiting the system or inventing your own mechanism for capturing console output. (more…)

How to Protect Data at Rest with Amazon EC2 Instance Store Encryption

by Assaf Namer | on | in How-to guides, Security | | Comments

Encrypting data at rest is vital for regulatory compliance to ensure that sensitive data saved on disks is not readable by any user or application without a valid key. Some compliance regulations such as PCI DSS and HIPAA require that data at rest be encrypted throughout the data lifecycle. To this end, AWS provides data-at-rest options and key management to support the encryption process. For example, you can encrypt Amazon EBS volumes and configure Amazon S3 buckets for server-side encryption (SSE) using AES-256 encryption. Additionally, Amazon RDS supports Transparent Data Encryption (TDE).

Instance storage provides temporary block-level storage for Amazon EC2 instances. This storage is located on disks attached physically to a host computer. Instance storage is ideal for temporary storage of information that frequently changes, such as buffers, caches, and scratch data. By default, files stored on these disks are not encrypted.

In this blog post, I show a method for encrypting data on Linux EC2 instance stores by using Linux built-in libraries. This method encrypts files transparently, which protects confidential data. As a result, applications that process the data are unaware of the disk-level encryption.

First, though, I will provide some background information required for this solution. (more…)

How to Detect and Automatically Remediate Unintended Permissions in Amazon S3 Object ACLs with CloudWatch Events

by Mustafa Torun | on | in How-to guides, Security | | Comments

Amazon S3 Access Control Lists (ACLs) enable you to specify permissions that grant access to S3 buckets and objects. When S3 receives a request for an object, it verifies whether the requester has the necessary access permissions in the associated ACL. For example, you could set up an ACL for an object so that only the users in your account can access it, or you could make an object public so that it can be accessed by anyone.

If the number of objects and users in your AWS account is large, ensuring that you have attached correctly configured ACLs to your objects can be a challenge. For example, what if a user were to call the PutObjectAcl API call on an object that is supposed to be private and make it public? Or, what if a user were to call the PutObject with the optional Acl parameter set to public-read, therefore uploading a confidential file as publicly readable? In this blog post, I show a solution that uses Amazon CloudWatch Events to detect PutObject and PutObjectAcl API calls in near real time and helps ensure that the objects remain private by making automatic PutObjectAcl calls, when necessary.

Note that this process is a reactive approach, a complement to the proactive approach in which you would use the AWS Identity and Access Management (IAM) policy conditions to force your users to put objects with private access (see Specifying Conditions in a Policy for more information). The reactive approach I present in this post is for “just in case” situations in which the change on the ACL is accidental and must be fixed. (more…)

The Most Viewed AWS Security Blog Posts in 2016

by Craig Liebendorfer | on | in Announcements, Best Practices, Compliance, Encryption, Federation, How-to guides, Security | | Comments

The following 10 posts were the most viewed AWS Security Blog posts that we published during 2016. You can use this list as a guide to catch up on your blog reading or even read a post again that you found particularly useful.

  1. How to Set Up DNS Resolution Between On-Premises Networks and AWS Using AWS Directory Service and Amazon Route 53
  2. How to Control Access to Your Amazon Elasticsearch Service Domain
  3. How to Restrict Amazon S3 Bucket Access to a Specific IAM Role
  4. Announcing AWS Organizations: Centrally Manage Multiple AWS Accounts
  5. How to Configure Rate-Based Blacklisting with AWS WAF and AWS Lambda
  6. How to Use AWS WAF to Block IP Addresses That Generate Bad Requests
  7. How to Record SSH Sessions Established Through a Bastion Host
  8. How to Manage Secrets for Amazon EC2 Container Service–Based Applications by Using Amazon S3 and Docker
  9. Announcing Industry Best Practices for Securing AWS Resources
  10. How to Set Up DNS Resolution Between On-Premises Networks and AWS Using AWS Directory Service and Microsoft Active Directory

(more…)

How to Monitor AWS Account Configuration Changes and API Calls to Amazon EC2 Security Groups

by Jeff Levine | on | in How-to guides, Security | | Comments

You can use AWS security controls to detect and mitigate risks to your AWS resources. The purpose of each security control is defined by its control objective. For example, the control objective of an Amazon VPC security group is to permit only designated traffic to enter or leave a network interface. Let’s say you have an Internet-facing ecommerce website, and your security administrator has determined that only HTTP (TCP port 80) and HTTPS (TCP 443) traffic should be allowed access to the public subnet. As a result, your administrator configures a security group to meet this control objective.

What if, though, someone were to inadvertently change this security group’s rules and enable FTP or other protocols to access the public subnet from any location on the Internet? That expanded access could weaken the security posture of your assets. Consequently, your administrator might need to monitor the integrity of your company’s security controls so that the controls maintain their desired effectiveness.

In this blog post, I explore two methods for detecting unintended changes to VPC security groups. The two methods address not only control objectives but also control failures. (more…)