AWS Architecture Blog

Accelerate deployments on AWS with effective governance

Amazon Web Services (AWS) users ask how to accelerate their teams’ deployments on AWS while maintaining compliance with security controls. In this blog post, we describe common governance models introduced in mature organizations to manage their teams’ AWS deployments. These models are best used to increase the maturity of your cloud infrastructure deployments.

Governance models for AWS deployments

We distinguish three common models used by mature cloud adopters to manage their infrastructure deployments on AWS. The models differ in what they control: the infrastructure code, deployment toolchain, or provisioned AWS resources. We define the models as follows:

  1. Central pattern library, which offers a repository of curated deployment templates that application teams can re-use with their deployments.
  2. Continuous Integration/Continuous Delivery (CI/CD) as a service, which offers a toolchain standard to be re-used by application teams.
  3. Centrally managed infrastructure, which allows application teams to deploy AWS resources managed by central operations teams.

The decision of how much responsibility you shift to application teams depends on their autonomy, operating model, application type, and rate of change. The three models can be used in tandem to address different use cases and maximize impact. Typically, organizations start by gathering pre-approved deployment templates in a central pattern library.

Model 1: Central pattern library

With this model, cloud platform engineers publish a central pattern library from which teams can reference infrastructure as code templates. Application teams reuse the templates by forking the central repository or by copying the templates into their own repository. Application teams can also manage their own deployment AWS account and pipeline with AWS CodePipeline), as well as the resource-provisioning process, while reusing templates from the central pattern library with a service like AWS CodeCommit. Figure 1 provides an overview of this governance model.

Deployment governance with central pattern library

Figure 1. Deployment governance with central pattern library

The central pattern library represents the least intrusive form of enablement via reusable assets. Application teams appreciate the central pattern library model, as it allows them to maintain autonomy over their deployment process and toolchain. Reusing existing templates speeds up the creation of your teams’ first infrastructure templates and eases policy adherence, such as tagging policies and security controls.

After the reusable templates are in the application team’s repository, incremental updates can be pulled from the central library when the template has been enhanced. This allows teams to pull when they see fit. Changes to the team’s repository will trigger the pipeline to deploy the associated infrastructure code.

With the central pattern library model, application teams need to manage resource configuration and CI/CD toolchain on their own in order to gain the benefits of automated deployments. Model 2 addresses this.

Model 2: CI/CD as a service

In Model 2, application teams launch a governed deployment pipeline from AWS Service Catalog. This includes the infrastructure code needed to run the application and “hello world” source code to show the end-to-end deployment flow.

Cloud platform engineers develop the service catalog portfolio (in this case the CI/CD toolchain). Then, application teams can launch AWS Service Catalog products, which deploy an instance of the pipeline code and populated Git repository (Figure 2).

The pipeline is initiated immediately after the repository is populated, which results in the “hello world” application being deployed to the first environment. The infrastructure code (for example, Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud [Amazon EC2] and AWS Fargate) will be located in the application team’s repository. Incremental updates can be pulled by launching a product update from AWS Service Catalog. This allows application teams to pull when they see fit.

Deployment governance with CI/CD as a service

Figure 2. Deployment governance with CI/CD as a service

This governance model is particularly suitable for mature developer organizations with full-stack responsibility or platform projects, as it provides end-to-end deployment automation to provision resources across multiple teams and AWS accounts. This model also adds security controls over the deployment process.

Since there is little room for teams to adapt the toolchain standard, the model can be perceived as very opinionated. The model expects application teams to manage their own infrastructure. Model 3 addresses this.

Model 3: Centrally managed infrastructure

This model allows application teams to provision resources managed by a central operations team as self-service. Cloud platform engineers publish infrastructure portfolios to AWS Service Catalog with pre-approved configuration by central teams (Figure 3). These portfolios can be shared with all AWS accounts used by application engineers.

Provisioning AWS resources via AWS Service Catalog products ensures resource configuration fulfills central operations requirements. Compared with Model 2, the pre-populated infrastructure templates launch AWS Service Catalog products, as opposed to directly referencing the API of the corresponding AWS service (for example Amazon EC2). This locks down how infrastructure is configured and provisioned.

Deployment governance with centrally managed infrastructure

Figure 3. Deployment governance with centrally managed infrastructure

In our experience, it is essential to manage the variety of AWS Service Catalog products. This avoids proliferation of products with many templates differing slightly. Centrally managed infrastructure propagates an “on-premises” mindset so it should be used only in cases where application teams cannot own the full stack.

Models 2 and 3 can be combined for application engineers to launch both deployment toolchain and resources as AWS Service Catalog products (Figure 4), while also maintaining the opportunity to provision from pre-populated infrastructure templates in the team repository. After the code is in their repository, incremental updates can be pulled by running an update from the provisioned AWS Service Catalog product. This allows the application team to pull an update as needed while avoiding manual deployments of service catalog products.

Using AWS Service Catalog to automate CI/CD and infrastructure resource provisioning

Figure 4. Using AWS Service Catalog to automate CI/CD and infrastructure resource provisioning

Comparing models

The three governance models differ along the following aspects (see Table 1):

  • Governance level: What component is managed centrally by cloud platform engineers?
  • Role of application engineers: What is the responsibility split and operating model?
  • Use case: When is each model applicable?

Table 1. Governance models for managing infrastructure deployments

 

Model 1: Central pattern library Model 2: CI/CD as a service Model 3: Centrally managed infrastructure
Governance level Centrally defined infrastructure templates Centrally defined deployment toolchain Centrally defined provisioning and management of AWS resources
Role of cloud platform engineers Manage pattern library and policy checks Manage deployment toolchain and stage checks Manage resource provisioning (including CI/CD)
Role of application teams Manage deployment toolchain and resource provisioning Manage resource provisioning Manage application integration
Use case Federated governance with application teams maintaining autonomy over application and infrastructure Platform projects or development organizations with strong preference for pre-defined deployment standards including toolchain Applications without development teams (e.g., “commercial-off-the-shelf”) or with separation of duty (e.g., infrastructure operations teams)

Conclusion

In this blog post, we distinguished three common governance models to manage the deployment of AWS resources. The three models can be used in tandem to address different use cases and maximize impact in your organization. The decision of how much responsibility is shifted to application teams depends on your organizational setup and use case.

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Rostislav Markov

Rostislav Markov

Rostislav Markov is principal architect with AWS Professional Services. As technical leader in Strategic Industries, he works with AWS customers and partners on their cloud transformation programs. Outside of work, he enjoys spending time with his family outdoors and exploring New York City culture.

Justin Kuskowski

Justin Kuskowski

Justin Kuskowski is a Principal DevOps Consultant at Amazon Web Services. He works directly with AWS customers to provide guidance and technical assistance around improving their value stream which ultimately reduces product time to market and leads to a better customer experience. Outside of work, Justin enjoys traveling the country to watch his two kids play soccer and spending time with his family and friends wakesurfing on the lakes in Michigan.

Nathan Scott

Nathan Scott

Nathan Scott is a principal architect with AWS Professional Services, where he helps global enterprise customers with strategic initiatives. He has a passion for operational excellence and supported customers in successful cloud adoption, mass migration, transformation, security, infrastructure architecture, and automation.