AWS Game Tech Blog

Tag: multiplayer games

Building Battle-Tested Network Transport

Authored by Rajiv Puvvada, Senior Software Development Engineer, Amazon Lumberyard. Introduction Online multiplayer isn’t just a feature for many games; it’s core component of gameplay. It has to be performant; it has to be reliable; and it has to be stable. And, perhaps to no-one’s surprise, developing online multiplayer is hard — especially when poor […]

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AWS announces AMD EPYC™ processor-based instance support for Amazon GameLift

Today, we are excited to announce a collaboration with AMD that provides instance support for Amazon GameLift. An AWS managed service, GameLift enables developers to deploy, operate, and scale dedicated servers in the cloud for multiplayer games. Whether it’s creating a 200+ player battle royale game with Large Match Support or automatically adapting server capacity […]

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Game Developers Guide to Getting Started with Amazon DynamoDB

  We all know that a database is an integral part of many games. But, as a game developer, you want to dedicate all your time and expertise to building great games, not engineering databases. I get it, I’d much rather worry about fixing collision volumes, getting my frame rate up or making the perfect […]

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Managed Databases for Awesome Games

Games? Databases? How do they go together? Aren’t databases what insurance companies use to keep their actuarial tables? Are you asking me to become an enterprise developer? Honestly, many of you already have a general idea of what databases are, though you might be wondering where they fit in to your game or game development […]

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Multiplayer of MotoGP19: How Milestone Moved to Amazon GameLift

Multiplayer games face some tough requirements to make believable worlds for players. And the meticulous attention to speed, accuracy, and physics makes real-world racing games one of the most demanding of all. So when players ask for that world to be taken online, how would you deliver the low latency and stability needed for high-powered […]

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How to defend games against DDoS attacks

When launching a new game, it’s critical to ensure your players can access and enjoy it without interruption. That’s why you need to protect your game against Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) attacks. Fortunately, if you’re building your game on AWS, you’re already protected against many common DDoS attacks. This post explores the architecture decisions […]

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Protect Multiplayer Game Servers From DDoS Attacks Using Amazon GameLift

Today’s most successful multiplayer games connect millions of gamers around the world. The spirit of competition and gameplay is amplified when players connect online. With the rise of multiplayer gaming, there has been an increase in the frequency and intensity of cyber-attacks that disconnect players from their favorite games and leave them disappointed. A common […]

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Introducing the Lumberyard Cloud Canvas Resource Manager

One of the ways Lumberyard is deeply integrated with AWS is through Cloud Canvas, a set of tools designed to help your engineers and technical designers—even with little to no backend experience—build online game features. Last month, we released Lumberyard Beta 1.3, which includes a new tool for Cloud Canvas – the Cloud Canvas Resource […]

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Automating Deployments to Amazon GameLift

One of the perks of building a multiplayer game in Lumberyard is using Amazon GameLift to manage the backend. Amazon GameLift is our managed service for deploying, operating, and scaling session-based multiplayer game servers in the cloud. Teams making multiplayer games must have a backend strong enough to handle sudden player population spikes, and GameLift […]

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Using Autoscaling to Control Costs While Delivering Great Player Experiences

Game developers with real-time multiplayer games tell us they want to spend less on infrastructure expenses while still providing great online experiences for their players. The challenge is that player demand can fluctuate each day, hour, or even minute. When server capacity is fixed, developers run the risk of having too much or too little […]

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