Amazon Game Tech Blog

Category: Amazon GameLift

Multiplayer of MotoGP19: How Milestone Moved to Amazon GameLift

Multiplayer games face some tough requirements to make believable worlds for players. And the meticulous attention to speed, accuracy, and physics makes real-world racing games one of the most demanding of all. So when players ask for that world to be taken online, how would you deliver the low latency and stability needed for high-powered […]

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Amazon GameLift Realtime Servers Now Available

  After being announced in preview at Game Developers Conference (GDC) 2019, Amazon GameLift Realtime Servers is now available to help game developers create and customize affordable game servers. Building a great multiplayer game experience oftentimes has barriers that deter game developers from building a multiplayer game. It can be time consuming and costly, and […]

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Creating Servers for Multiplayer Mobile Games with Just a Few Lines of JavaScript

Multiplayer servers are hard Traditionally, developing a custom game server is a pretty arduous task. Putting a server together requires a lot of knowledge about networking systems, backend development and server operations. This can be tough on smaller teams who may not have the resources required to develop this type of system. And, when you […]

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GameLift Realtime Preview

Announcing Amazon GameLift Realtime Servers, Now in Preview

  Across all game genres and all gaming platforms, player demand for vibrant online experiences is driving the growth of multiplayer games. But creating a multiplayer game can be a daunting challenge for many game developers. Traditional commercial solutions for multiplayer game servers are often optimized for games that are very sensitive to latency with […]

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Get Autoscaling Right the First Time with Amazon GameLift Target Tracking

No one likes paying for things they don’t use – and server capacity is no different. Typical multiplayer games use only 50% of their peak server capacity on average, meaning that half of the time the game servers have no active players. To reduce wasted capacity and costs, Amazon GameLift can automatically turn off game […]

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Moving from P2P to Cloud: How For Honor & Friday the 13th The Game Improved Player Experience

As a game developer, you invest years into building a game and fostering a community of fans that eagerly wait for launch day to arrive. And while backend infrastructure may not be top of mind when trying to provide a great player experience, the choices you make behind the scenes could effect player facing areas […]

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Reduce Cost by up to 90% with Amazon GameLift FleetIQ and Spot Instances

Amazon GameLift is an AWS service for deploying, operating, and scaling dedicated game servers for session-based multiplayer games. Today we released two new additions to the service: FleetIQ and Spot instances. Spot instances offer access to spare AWS computing capacity at savings of up to 90% compared to On-Demand prices. You can achieve these savings […]

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Fast, Fun and Full Games with Backfill Functionality for FlexMatch

Deploy and scale dedicated game servers with Amazon GameLift in minutes. Create a Free Account » Developing, deploying and managing multiplayer games presents many complex challenges when it comes to creating competitive matches for players around the world. Your players expect low latency experiences, fun gameplay, short wait times and few interruptions once the game […]

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The Questions of MatchMaking: Wait Time VS Match Quality

About the author: Bruce Brown currently leads the team responsible for building Amazon GameLift‘s FlexMatch matchmaking service.  He has been in the software industry for 12 years including time spent at Microsoft on the Xbox Live Cloud Compute and Xbox Multiplayer teams, as well as at Riot Games where he worked on the League of […]

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Disc Jam Case Study: Supporting a Mission for Fast-Paced Competitive Gameplay with Amazon Gamelift

About High Horse Entertainment Having gained over 20 years’ experience at both Treyarch and Activision, where they worked on successful titles from the Call of Duty and Guitar Hero franchises, Software Engineers Jay Mattis and Timothy Rapp chose to leave the AAA landscape to co-found an independent game studio that focuses on their shared mission […]

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