AWS Architecture Blog

Category: Networking & Content Delivery

Updates to Serverless Architectural Patterns and Best Practices

As we sail past the halfway point between re:Invent 2018 and re:Invent 2019, I’d like to revisit some of the recent serverless announcements we’ve made. These are all complimentary to the patterns discussed in the re:Invent architecture track’s Serverless Architectural Patterns and Best Practices session. AWS Event Fork Pipelines AWS Event Fork Pipelines was announced […]

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Ministry of Justice Landing Zone

Building an AWS Landing Zone from Scratch in Six Weeks

In an effort to deliver a simpler, smarter, and more unified experience on its website, the UK’s Ministry of Justice and its Lead Technical Architect, James Abley, created a bespoke AWS Landing Zone, a pre-defined template for an AWS account or infrastructure. And they did it in six weeks. Supporting 33 agencies and public bodies, […]

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Migration hub

Optimizing a Lift-and-Shift for Security

This is the third and final blog within a three-part series that examines how to optimize lift-and-shift workloads. A lift-and-shift is a common approach for migrating to AWS, whereby you move a workload from on-prem with little or no modification. This third blog examines how lift-and-shift workloads can benefit from an improved security posture with […]

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Cost effectiveness

Optimizing a Lift-and-Shift for Cost Effectiveness and Ease of Management

Lift-and-shift is the process of migrating a workload from on premise to AWS with little or no modification. A lift-and-shift is a common route for enterprises to move to the cloud, and can be a transitionary state to a more cloud native approach. This is the second blog post in a three-part series which investigates […]

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performance

Optimizing a Lift-and-Shift for Performance

Many organizations begin their cloud journey with a lift-and-shift of applications from on-premise to AWS. This approach involves migrating software deployments with little, or no, modification. A lift-and-shift avoids a potentially expensive application rewrite but can result in a less optimal workload than a cloud native solution. For many organizations, a lift-and-shift is a transitional […]

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Running Multiple HTTP Endpoints as a Highly Available Health Proxy

Route 53 Health Checks provide the ability to verify that endpoints are reachable and that HTTP and HTTPS endpoints successfully respond. However, there are many situations where DNS failover would be useful, but TCP, HTTP, and HTTPS health checks alone can’t sufficiently determine the health of the endpoint. In these cases, it’s possible for an […]

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Doing Constant Work to Avoid Failures

Amazon Route 53’s DNS Failover feature allows fast, automatic rerouting at the DNS layer based on the health of some endpoints. Endpoints are actively monitored from multiple locations and both application or connectivity issues can trigger failover. Trust No One One of the goals in designing the DNS Failover feature was making it resilient to […]

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A Case Study in Global Fault Isolation

In a previous blog post, we talked about using shuffle sharding to get magical fault isolation. Today, we’ll examine a specific use case that Route 53 employs and one of the interesting tradeoffs we decided to make as part of our sharding. Then, we’ll discuss how you can employ some of these concepts in your […]

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Organizing Software Deployments to Match Failure Conditions

Deploying new software into production will always carry some amount of risk, and failed deployments (e.g., software bugs, misconfigurations, etc.) will occasionally occur. As a service owner, the goal is to try and reduce the number of these incidents and to limit customer impact when they do occur. One method to reduce potential impact is […]

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