AWS Machine Learning Blog

Category: Amazon Lex*

Enhance Your Amazon Lex Chatbots with Responses

You can now add responses to your Amazon Lex chatbots directly from the AWS Management Console. Use responses to set up dynamic, engaging interactions with your users. Using responses Responses are the final element of a bot’s intent, and are displayed to users after the fulfillment of the intent is complete.  A response might include […]

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Deploy a Web UI for Your Chatbot 

by Oliver Atoa and Bob Strahan | on | in Amazon Lex* | Permalink | Comments |  Share

You’ve built a very cool chatbot using Amazon Lex. You’ve tested it using the Amazon Lex console. Now you’re ready to deploy it on your website. Although you could build your own bot user interface (UI), that seems like a lot to take on. You’d need to handle support for different devices and browsers, authentication, […]

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Build an Amazon Lex Chatbot with Microsoft Excel

This is a guest post by AWS Community Hero Cyrus Wong. Our institution (IVE) here in Hong Kong has begun experimenting with Amazon Lex in teaching, research, and healthcare. We have many non-technical employees, such as English teachers in IVE and therapists from IVE Childcare, Elderly and Community Services Discipline, who don’t have the technical […]

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How Astro Built Astrobot Voice, a Chatbot for Email

This is a guest post by Roland Schemers, CTO of Astro Technology, Inc. Astro, in their own words, “creates modern email apps for Mac, iOS and Android, powered by artificial intelligence, built for people and teams. With Astrobot Voice, an in-app email voice assistant, you can now read, manage, and reply to emails without leaving Astro’s […]

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Build a Voice Kit with Amazon Lex and a Raspberry Pi

In this post, we show how you can embed Amazon Lex into custom hardware using widely available components. We demonstrate how you can build a simple voice-based AI kit and connect it to Amazon Lex. We’ll use a Raspberry Pi and a few off-the-shelf components totaling less than $60. By the end of this blog […]

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Create a Question and Answer Bot with Amazon Lex and Amazon Alexa

by Bob Strahan and John Calhoun | on | in Amazon Lex* | Permalink | Comments |  Share

Your users have questions and you have answers, but you need a better way for your users to ask their questions and get the right answers. They often call your help desk, or post to your support forum, but over time this adds stress and cost to your organization. Could a chat bot add value […]

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Enhancements to the Amazon Lex Console Let You Test Your Bot for Better Troubleshooting

Building your chatbot in the Amazon Lex console takes just a few steps, and testing your bot is just as easy. We’ve made enhancements to the Test window of the Amazon Lex console which now provides you more details during testing and enables easier bot troubleshooting. Once you’ve built a bot to test, the Test […]

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Export your Amazon Lex bot schema to the Alexa Skills Kit

You can now export your Amazon Lex chatbot schema into the Alexa Skills Kit to simplify the process of creating an Alexa skill. Amazon Lex now provides the ability to export your Amazon Lex chatbot definition as a JSON file that can be added to the Alexa Skills Kit (ASK). Once you add the bot schema file […]

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Use Synonyms and Slot Value Validation in your Amazon Lex Chatbots

You can now provide synonyms for slot values in Amazon Lex. With the synonym functionality, you can specify multiple synonyms for a slot value in your chatbot. The synonyms specified are resolved to the corresponding slot values. For example, if the slot value is “comedy”, with “funny” and “humorous” specified as synonyms, then user input […]

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AWS CloudTrail Integration is Now Available in Amazon Lex

Amazon Lex is now integrated with AWS CloudTrail, a service that enables you to log, continuously monitor, and retain events related to API calls across your AWS infrastructure, to provide a history of API calls for your account. Amazon Lex API calls are captured from the Amazon Lex console or from your API operations using […]

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