AWS Government, Education, & Nonprofits Blog

Tag: Amazon EC2

edtech startups

Hot AWS EdStart Startups: Improving student outcomes through personalized learning

AWS EdStart Members are on a mission to bridge the personalized learning gap between students and educational institutions through artificial intelligence (AI)-powered platforms built on Amazon Web Services (AWS). These organizations are enabling students to follow their own learning pathways across writing, math, and reading, at their own pace, anytime, and anywhere. Learn about these three AWS EdStart Members and how they adapt to student learning and virtually assist self-study.

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Using the AWS Cloud to restore ecosystems around the world

The world’s forests have decreased by nearly half since the onset of human civilization. Deforestation is continuing at a high rate due to agricultural pressure, poor land management, and climate change, which increases drought, disease, and invasive species. But a new generation of technologies is transforming our ability to manage and grow forests. The unprecedented level of data enables ecology-trained artificial intelligence (AI) to inventory the ecosystem and identify problems like plant condition stress, invasive weeds, species decline, and erosion. Learn how Dendra systems is using the cloud to restore ecosystems around the world.

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stethescope

Enabling security, interoperability, and discovery in healthcare with the cloud

How can healthcare organizations use Amazon Web Services (AWS) to better serve patients and meet their mission? Learn how government, education, and nonprofit healthcare organizations are using the AWS Cloud to keep patient information secure, achieve interoperability, and speed time to science.

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pFaces targets heterogenous hardware configurations (HWCs) combining compute nodes (CNs) of CPUs, GPUs and hardware accelerators (HWAs). A web-based interface helps developers design parallel algorithms and run them on targeted HWCs.

TUM researcher finds new approach to safety-critical systems using parallelized algorithms on AWS

Mahmoud Khaled, a PhD student at TUM and a research assistant at LMU, researches how to improve safety-critical systems that require large amounts of compute power. Using AWS, Khaled’s research project, pFaces, accelerates parallelized algorithms and controls computational complexity to speed the time to science. His project findings introduce a new way to design and deploy verified control software for safety-critical systems, such as autonomous vehicles.

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Leveraging the cloud for rapid climate risk assessments

Four Twenty Seven builds tools and services that help bring climate data (sourced from government agencies and academic institutions) to public and private organizations so they can better understand their exposure to climate hazards and manage risk in their communities. Four Twenty Seven’s new on-demand scoring application allows users to enter an asset’s location and receive risk scores for each site in real-time.

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Photo by Erika Gronek, ASU

Students across Arizona participate in a statewide robotics hackathon

In collaboration with Amazon Web Services (AWS) and NVIDIA, Arizona State University (ASU) hosted its first-ever robotics hackathon. At the Arizona Robo Hackathon, 64 undergraduate and graduate students across seven institutions came together to compete in an Arizona statewide competition hosted on AWS. By the end of the hackathon, students successfully applied their knowledge of computer science, engineering, and programming skills in robotics and artificial intelligence (AI) application development.

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A snapshot of the Water Observations from Space (WOfS) continental-wide data product from DE Africa for the Bintang Bolong River in The Gambia. Derived from USGS Landsat data, blue and purple colors indicate persistent observations, while red and orange colors indicate more sporadic observations.

Digital Earth Africa: Enabling insights for better decision-making

As part of the Amazon Sustainability Data Initiative, Amazon Web Services (AWS) is supporting Digital Earth Africa (DE Africa). DE Africa is enabling African nations to track changes across the continent in unprecedented detail by making Earth observation (EO) data more easily accessible. This will provide valuable insights for better decision-making around prevention and planning in areas including flooding, droughts, soil and coastal erosion, agriculture, forest-cover, land use and land cover change, water availability and quality, and changes to human settlements.

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microscope in lab closeup

Structural biologists learning cryo-electron microscopy can access educational resources powered by AWS

Cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) — the technology that won the 2017 Nobel Prize in Chemistry — lets scientists peer into the molecular “machines” at work in our cells in ways that were previously impossible. Using advanced microscopes, cryo-EM captures images of proteins flash-frozen in vitreous ice, revealing their 3D structure in near-native states. Even as access to this technology improves, many researchers are still limited by computing bottlenecks. The cryo-EM field needs to provide more hands-on training in how to process such large datasets. Amazon Web Services (AWS) allows us to provide training, broadening the impact of this important structural biology technology.

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Dr. Nick Engerer, CTO of Solcast, standing next to solar panels

Solcast: Solar irradiance forecasting for the solar powered future

Solcast produces real-time, historical and forecast estimates of the available solar radiation resources around the globe. Altogether, this requires processing imagery from five geostationary weather satellites, which take snapshots of the Earth from space every 5-15 minutes. These images can be as fine as 1 kilometer in spatial resolution and are re-captured and transmitted as frequently as every five minutes – a large volume of data. A single third-generation weather satellite in orbit over the United States such as the GOES-16 generates nearly two terabytes (TB) of data each month.

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Languages

Oxford University Press makes high-quality language data available using AWS

Oxford University Press (OUP) is a department of the University of Oxford and the largest university press in the world. In 2015, OUP launched the Oxford Global Languages (OGL) initiative aiming to build lexical resources for 100 of the world’s languages and make them freely available online. OUP knew that on-premises solutions wouldn’t provide the scalability and flexibility required for developing an MVP and expanding it in case of success. OUP chose Amazon Web Services (AWS) because it matched the requirements around scalability and flexibility, provided managed services for storing and accessing data securely, and offered options for deployment and automation.

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